Jump to content

300: Rise of an Empire - Due March 2014: Was 300 Thread


Links
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • 2 weeks later...

Just seen the trailer for this played in the cinema, before apocolipta. Its the same as the first trailer, except for a rather vicious shot of the kid punching another kid lying on the floor in the face instead of him just standing up. Imagine the face-punching shot from the Matrix Revolutions, but with kids. There were a few other brief shots that were inserted, but I cant remember what they were. I do remember that it looked even more awesome on the big screen though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Braveheart's also a piece of rabble-rousing rubbish, but it has slightly more basis in fact than this: the Scots were fighting for a more free society. Ish.

Please don't say that. The only true bit about Braveheart was that William Wallace was Scottish. I will go and see 300 but I'm going to try and few it as a fantasy film otherwise all the liberties they take with the true story will just irritate me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please don't say that. The only true bit about Braveheart was that William Wallace was Scottish. I will go and see 300 but I'm going to try and few it as a fantasy film otherwise all the liberties they take with the true story will just irritate me.

Hey, it is slightly more based in fact. I didn't say it was accurate (hell, it manages to make Gladiator look like a documentary at points), but it's not quite as far removed as 300.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey, it is slightly more based in fact. I didn't say it was accurate (hell, it manages to make Gladiator look like a documentary at points), but it's not quite as far removed as 300.

I've got a M.Phil Degree in History and I've learned to chill out. You should toso, 300 is going to be a shouty, amazing violent mess.

And the saving of their "collective asses" does also include the preservation Greece no?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sadly, I'm not a fan of "shouty, amazing violent mess[es]".

Not sure what the second sentence is meant to say, though. If you're trying to suggest that the Spartans were fighting to protect the Greek city states from invasion by the Persians, then yes, naturally. It was rather in their best interests to keep the Persians as far away as possible.

Assuming the accuracy of the history of the war (questionable, for obvious reasons), then the battle of Thermopylae held off the Persian forces for long enough to let the city states build up their forces enough to defend themselves effectively. The various Greek states hardly represented a more 'free' society than the Persian empire. More varied, perhaps, and certainly more piratical, but that's about it.

But that's not what bothers me, I can actually cope with films not being historically accurate (I mostly enjoyed Gladiator, for example), even if their presentist alterations offend me slightly. Frank Miller just offends me by being a base, chauvinist prick. Which carries over into his comics, and therefore films of comics.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jesus Christ Wiper, it's a comic book movie. Not only that, it's a comic book movie based on what is essentially a myth.

I'm not going to start bashing Clash of the Titans's representation of Greece, or Troys', because they're all myths. Your opinions of Frank Miller aside, historical accuracy doesn't come into it. It's irrelevant.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sadly, I'm not a fan of "shouty, amazing violent mess[es]".

Not sure what the second sentence is meant to say, though. If you're trying to suggest that the Spartans were fighting to protect the Greek city states from invasion by the Persians, then yes, naturally. It was rather in their best interests to keep the Persians as far away as possible.

Assuming the accuracy of the history of the war (questionable, for obvious reasons), then the battle of Thermopylae held off the Persian forces for long enough to let the city states build up their forces enough to defend themselves effectively. The various Greek states hardly represented a more 'free' society than the Persian empire. More varied, perhaps, and certainly more piratical, but that's about it.

But that's not what bothers me, I can actually cope with films not being historically accurate (I mostly enjoyed Gladiator, for example), even if their presentist alterations offend me slightly. Frank Miller just offends me by being a base, chauvinist prick. Which carries over into his comics, and therefore films of comics.

i thought Sparta was a really harsh place historically. But had free women as homosexuality was ecouraged hence women had more freedom.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i thought Sparta was a really harsh place historically. But had free women as homosexuality was ecouraged hence women had more freedom.

As I now appreciate, this isn't really relevant in this thread, but as you've asked:

Homosexuality wasn't encouraged per se, just not frowned upon. Pederasty was more common than straight forward homosexuality, though. It certainly had no bearing on how women were treated - whether a man had or still did enjoy the pleasures that other men could provide hardly meant he was likely to treat his female partner with any more respect. Sparta's women were more empowered than their other Greek counterparts - by Spartan law they inherited land (if they had a brother, the woman would get 1/3, the man 2/3), but generally they were still very constrained, particularly once married. Other than that though, their nature as a slave-reliant culture (not just with using captured slaves like other Greek states, but with an entire slave race upon which their society relied for virtually all non-fighting tasks) made them about as far-removed from a 'free' culture as possible.

Also, the habit of their (pleasantly unusual) dual-kingship-based government keeping all its decisions hidden from the Spartan public as far as humanly possible was interesting, to say the least.

But yes, pretty much every European and African society at the time was about as far removed from being 'free' as you could imagine. Even Athens (whose freedoms due to democracy are strongly over-represented).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

This movie is pure eye candy and as such certainly not for everyone. You could say the same about Sin City though, and that was one acclaimed movie. Still, it's one of the movies I can't wait to see. Big, operatic violence full of beautiful shots. Yes, please.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Like someone said in the messageboard below the article, how can one room of people be right when there have been so many dazzling reviews elsewhere?

I'm still onboard for this :wub:

I thought the only reviews before the Berlin Festival were from Aintitcool which doesn't mean much when Harry loves everything (especially when he knows the people involved in the production of the film).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm sure (I'll admit not 100%) that I've read reviews that weren't from the AICN screening. I admit that some were posted on the site but weren't from the screening. Haven't the guys at CHUD also seen it?

What worries me in this situation (I'll rephrase that - annoys me - because let's face it, a bag of bad reviews isn't going to put people off the movie) is that this is the story that'll get picked up and repeated around the globe, like when The Fountain was booed a while back as well. (Venice Film fest?) Some people, and sure it's their loss, might pass on the movie based on stories like this.

:wub:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is from the premiere, not the press screening that resulted in the booing and walkouts -

"300," one of the highlights of the Berlin Film Festival, had its world premiere last night and received a standing ovation in the sold out Berlinale Palast.. The film, inspired by the work of graphic novelist Frank Miller, was attended by director Zack Snyder and cast members Gerard Butler (King Leonidas) and Rodrigo Santoro (Xerxes). The screening was interrupted again and again by spontaneous applause and cheers from the 1700 strong audience. Said Zack Snyder: “It was awesome to be at the Berlin Film Festival World Premiere and experience the amazing reaction.”

Is it really a case of playing to the right audience?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.