Jump to content

Stephen King


Silent Runner
 Share

Recommended Posts

Finished Under the Dome last night, I liked it. It gripped me nicely (as King's best stuff always does) and I banged through it in just over a week.

Characters were very familiar to any King fan but that's not to be knocked, the ending fizzled a bit but was nice regardless.

Funny thing is I'd thought of the same (basic) story about fifteen years ago. Musing about alien kids picking up humans like we might catch crabs in a rock pool and then being told to throw them back and the aftermath of the unlucky victim's lives. I've even written a 1st chapter to it somewhere.... :) So I was quite pleased that the man himself had thought of the rough idea back in '76 but had only just gotten around to writing it properly. Great minds think alike eh....? :eyebrows::lol:

I thought that Rennie became pretty crazed pretty quickly, but then I guess he must have been teetering on the edge for quite some time. Also bit of a coincidence that these alien "kids" just happened to pick a place that was supplying meth all round the country. Although if they truly were looking at the characters as if they were ants then maybe they could easily see the supply of the illicit goods and understand what it might mean cutting them off, much like we might with ants and sugar or deliberately placing poison.

But I liked Barbie (how does he think up his names? Who would have thought to call the tough hero Barbie? And yet it works so well!) and Julia was a cool character and Twitch too. I'd liked to have seen a bit more of the kid's adventures but at 850 odd pages I guess it was already getting pretty long!

The part when Rennie died was fabulous, the man's mind turning on him at the end, classic King. The twitching corpse and the ghosts! :)

A nice concept executed very well, although (as already said) it did feel a little flat come the end

Well worth a read for any King fan.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Bump! You do know that Cycle of the Werewolf has already been made into a film, don't you? Or do you mean for a better version to be made.

(Another big bump) Heh heh, the latter.

Corey Haim and Gary Busey - what's not to like?

Not much, actually. Other than the budget and the crap effects and awful acting, it's excellent! It's a guilty pleasure, though. I love how the Silver Bullet becomes a souped-up, rocket-powered wheelchair...

There are great bits in it: the part in the forest when the kid faces off against the moster across a wooden bridge is classic King. And the final battle in the house (though shoddily acted, directed, shot, set-dressed...) is stuffed full of tension and good ideas. Shame there have only been 1.5 decently frightening werewolf movies ever made (American Werewolf and bits of The Howling)*

* I actually liked The Wolfman - both original and remake, although I'm on my own with the latter - and Ginger Snaps. I also have a soft spot for The Beast Must Die!**. But none of those are in the least bit scary. EDIT: and Wolfen, The Company of Wolves and Dog Soldiers.

** I love the 'werewolf break' in that film:

Tom Newcliffe, a rich businessman and expert hunter summons six guests to his huge country estate which he has rigged up with video cameras and a high-tech security system. He tells them and his surprised wife that they are all to stay over a weekend and that all of them will be kept on the estate during that weekend. For each guest, dead bodies have followed in their wake and the way that the dead have been murdered means that one of the guest is a werewolf and Tom has summoned his guests here to discover who it is and to hunt it down... The film has a clip at the beginning asking people in the audience to try to identify the werewolf and near the end there is a 30-second "Werewolf Break" for the audience to think over the evidence...

...and the fact the 'werewolf' is an Alsatian...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

From Yahoo:

Stephen King has officially begun writing a follow-up novel to 'The Shining', which he confirmed by reading an excerpt to fans at a George Mason University event.

The story - called 'Dr. Sleep' - will focus on Danny Torrance, the young boy from the original. Now all grown-up, it sees Danny working in a hospice where he “uses his powers to help ill patients to pass away without pain. Unfortunately, he runs afoul of a gang of wandering psychic vampires who feed on people's energy.”

Here's the link.

:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Ooooh a King thread! I should have ventured in here sooner as Im a bit of a fan (The Dark Tower Particularly).

I just saw on FB that the tv / film version of the Dark Tower is still alive. Which fills me with dread. I can't see them doing it justice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I told you he'd be writing the Midworld novel too!

http://www.stephenking.com/promo/wind_through_the_keyhole/announcement/

StephenKing.com is proud to announce The Dark Tower: The Wind Through the Keyhole.

The next installment of the epic series is set for release in 2012.

Dear Constant Readers,

At some point, while worrying over the copyedited manuscript of the next book (11/22/63, out November 8th), I started thinking—and dreaming—about Mid-World again. The major story of Roland and his ka-tet was told, but I realized there was at least one hole in the narrative progression: what happened to Roland, Jake, Eddie, Susannah, and Oy between the time they leave the Emerald City (the end of Wizard and Glass) and the time we pick them up again, on the outskirts of Calla Bryn Sturgis (the beginning of Wolves of the Calla)?

There was a storm, I decided. One of sudden and vicious intensity. The kind to which billy-bumblers like Oy are particularly susceptible. Little by little, a story began to take shape. I saw a line of riders, one of them Roland’s old mate, Jamie DeCurry, emerging from clouds of alkali dust thrown by a high wind. I saw a severed head on a fencepost. I saw a swamp full of dangers and terrors. I saw just enough to want to see the rest. Long story short, I went back to visit an-tet with my friends for awhile. The result is a novel called The Wind Through the Keyhole. It’s finished, and I expect it will be published next year.

It won’t tell you much that’s new about Roland and his friends, but there’s a lot none of us knew about Mid-World, both past and present. The novel is shorter than DT 2-7, but quite a bit longer than the first volume—call this one DT-4.5. It’s not going to change anybody’s life, but God, I had fun.

-- Steve King

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's probably his masterpiece, despite its many and massive flaws. Forget Dark Tower - IT is Stephen King for better and worse.

I am upto Wolves Of The Calla I'm thinking about giving up as its pretty boring.

I thought Wizard And Glass was pretty good.

My Dad reckons after WAG the series goes down hill.

He said it appeared the King didn't know how to end the storey by the last book.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Wolves of the Calla is easily my favourite book in the series so far. Just finished Song of Susannah and am having a break before finishing the last one.

Loved the atmosphere and the weirdness of some of the elements of the story, particularly the 'rooint'.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From what I remember of the seventh book it wasn't that great, something about a corporation to fight evil. I don't really remember so it couldn't have been that exciting. But it was totally worth it for the Dandelo section and of course...

EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

EEEEEEEEEEE

EEEEEEEEEEEEEE!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I finished King's new one, 11/22/63.

It's alright but it's far too long. It starts really well but around the halfway point it becomes as slow as treacle and I was actively struggling to finish it.

There's loads to like; King comes up with a pretty unique twist on the time travel story, casually discarding some of the more familar "rules" that we all think should apply and coming up with his own.

Plot spoilers:

The biggest is that each trip down the "rabbit hole" to 1958 is always to the same moment, meaning that if you go, come back and go again, your previous trip has been erased - each time is a reboot. That's cool in a Groundhog Day kind of way if you want to rob a 1958 bank and get away with the money but not if you fall in love with someone or want your changes to the past to stick.

There's some nice references to other books and characters - including cameos from IT - and unlike a lot of his Dark Tower connections they don't feel forced in - though the obsession with 19 continues.

I also loved the way he made The Past itself a force to be battled against. Sure, it was a little Final Destination-y but it was a great idea that The Past would actively work against you should you try and change it too much. The "echoes" that kept coming through time too were nicely done as well - especially with the bookies.

I flat out hated the reveal of the "Yellow Card Man/Men"; he could have left the rabbit hole unexplained and let Jake's understanding of it be ours, instead he shoehorned in some clumsy, pseudo-sci-fi explanation that frankly doesn't even tie up with the rest of the book.

Ultimately though it's - ending spoiler within

the failure to show the Oswald attempt again that dissapointed me the most. After all, we got to see the Dunning attempt twice. With The Past working so hard to stop that change I was expecting the Oswald attempt to have to be done 3 or 4 times at least, not once with a postscript detailing that he'd try at least once again. After spending all that time with Sadie it would have been more tragic to me if we saw Jake working into his sixties or seventies trying to stop Oswald and save her.

Overall I liked it but it's length works against it and I feel he missed some opportunities.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

I finished King's new one, 11/22/63.

It's alright but it's far too long. It starts really well but around the halfway point it becomes as slow as treacle and I was actively struggling to finish it.

There's loads to like; King comes up with a pretty unique twist on the time travel story, casually discarding some of the more familar "rules" that we all think should apply and coming up with his own.

Plot spoilers:

The biggest is that each trip down the "rabbit hole" to 1958 is always to the same moment, meaning that if you go, come back and go again, your previous trip has been erased - each time is a reboot. That's cool in a Groundhog Day kind of way if you want to rob a 1958 bank and get away with the money but not if you fall in love with someone or want your changes to the past to stick.

There's some nice references to other books and characters - including cameos from IT - and unlike a lot of his Dark Tower connections they don't feel forced in - though the obsession with 19 continues.

I also loved the way he made The Past itself a force to be battled against. Sure, it was a little Final Destination-y but it was a great idea that The Past would actively work against you should you try and change it too much. The "echoes" that kept coming through time too were nicely done as well - especially with the bookies.

I flat out hated the reveal of the "Yellow Card Man/Men"; he could have left the rabbit hole unexplained and let Jake's understanding of it be ours, instead he shoehorned in some clumsy, pseudo-sci-fi explanation that frankly doesn't even tie up with the rest of the book.

Ultimately though it's - ending spoiler within

the failure to show the Oswald attempt again that dissapointed me the most. After all, we got to see the Dunning attempt twice. With The Past working so hard to stop that change I was expecting the Oswald attempt to have to be done 3 or 4 times at least, not once with a postscript detailing that he'd try at least once again. After spending all that time with Sadie it would have been more tragic to me if we saw Jake working into his sixties or seventies trying to stop Oswald and save her.

Overall I liked it but it's length works against it and I feel he missed some opportunities.

I finished it last night and agree that it did drag around the halfway point. But I felt that it picked up again at around the 75% mark (Oh Kindle, what have you done to me). So much so that I was up until 1:45 a.m reading the last 20% in one sitting.

With regards to the ending

I'm a bit confused by your synopsis of the ending. Jake never tried again, he went back to the past and wrote his account of the event, which he then buried in a lock box. After he'd done this then went back through the rabbit hole without changing anything.

I enjoyed it though. But then it is King, so it's almost impossible not to.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's a terrible, terrible shame King doesn't have an editor who'll stand up to him and hack the novels into reasonable shape and size.

I made the same point about Under the Tome (as my wife wittily put it) in that it's about 700 pages too long.

It would be so good if someone took the time and effort to do fan edits - very possible with digital versions. Just for balance, i'm a lifelong fan and thought The Stand (extended edition) was too short, if anything.

Oh, and I loved Dark Tower 7. Dandelo, the three riddling Kings, Father Callahan (amazing way to cross-populate stories), the vampires and low men, the turtle statue and even the Ka-Tet corporation - all great stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There were some part of the end of the Dark Tower series that really really jarred for me especially at the end where a few characters seemed like they were disposed off just because they had to be, characters that deserved far better treatment.

As 11/22/63 i really enjoyed it. kings books are technically too long but i always find myself so invested in his characters I really don't care, I enjoy the stuff that 'should' have been chopped out and relish the extra time I get to spend in whatever story he is spinning.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Having been a recent fan of Under the Dome and 11.22.63, which of the earlier horror novels would Rllmuk recommend? I would rather avoid the ones I am familiar with from the films, particularly Misery and The Shining.

You absolutely must read these, man:

IT

Salem's Lot

The Stand

For short stories, I'd start with:

Night Shift

Skeleton Crew

...and get the novellas:

Four Past Midnight

Different Seasons

Happy (spooky, terrified) reading. Especially when you read Salem's (and the short story Jerusalem's) Lot. Don't move onto The Dark Tower series until you've read a lot of King - it deconstructs his universe and is for long-time readers :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have you read It?

11.22.63 crosses over with it sort of.

The stuff in Derry.

No I haven't read it and yes, I got a little jolt when I picked IT up in WHS earlier today and noticed that :)

You absolutely must read these, man:

IT

Salem's Lot

The Stand

For short stories, I'd start with:

Night Shift

Skeleton Crew

...and get the novellas:

Four Past Midnight

Different Seasons

Happy (spooky, terrified) reading. Especially when you read Salem's (and the short story Jerusalem's) Lot. Don't move onto The Dark Tower series until you've read a lot of King - it deconstructs his universe and is for long-time readers :)

Cheers for that - it might also explain why I didn't particularly get on with The Dark Tower series some time ago.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Having been a recent fan of Under the Dome and 11.22.63, which of the earlier horror novels would Rllmuk recommend? I would rather avoid the ones I am familiar with from the films, particularly Misery and The Shining.

I have read The Shining, Salem's Lot and both are incredible.

But I could go on - I loved Cell a great deal too (not everyone's cup of tea).

A really unusual read that I felt was like a piece of art was "From a Buick 8". Awesome book.

ALSO I reckon the Richard Bachman penned novel BLAZE is pure class. Oozes film noir/old america. Would make a great film done properly. Not overly long and probably cheap.

In the middle of Lisey's story right now that is very enjoyable thus far.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Much overlooked but one of my favourites is Desperation, especially if you read it just after or before The Regulators (Bachman).

My favourite King books of all time are Pet Sematary, IT and The Shining but I also like most of his 'weaker' books apart from Bag of Bones, Dreamcatcher, Insomnia and Rose Madder maybe. I think I've read everything he wrote apart from some of the most recent 2-3 books, I usually lag behind a little. The Dark Tower isn't really my cup of tea, I loved the first 3 books and then it just became a slow spinning tale that ran completely out of steam near the end when the author decided to crawl as far up his own ass as he could to put an ending to it. I wouldn't have bothered with it if I knew in advance how it would pan out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.