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Robocop Remake - February 2014 - PG13 Rating Confirmed at ComicCon


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Keaton's complete about-turn from 'We can milk millions out this fucker' to 'LET'S KILL HIM, LULZ!', was complete bollocks.

They set up villains early and forget them for an hour, while we're being bored to tears by Robocop titting about in China.

Then suddenly, they're like "Fuck, we need something to actually happen."

The End.

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Casino Royale seemed to popularise the phrase. The makers had to be clear that the new Bond wasn't going to have any token nods to happenings in earlier films.

What was Batman Begins described as? It was certainly around those two films that the idea took off. They had to make a clean break after Batman & Robin and Die Another Die sullied their respecting franchises.

I distinctly remember Batman Begins being the first time "reboot" started being thrown about.

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Batman Begins is more of a re-boring than a reboot. Dispense with the outlandish bits from the franchise, then pretend that the leftovers are serious drama for adults because it's got Hans Zimmer over it.

That's not that far from what this film is trying to do, now you put it like that.

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We've had a decade of po-faced comic book/remake films like that, all down to your David S Goyers and your Zack Snyders. They never developed past what they were reading or watching in their teenage years and try to dress up their creative output with a fake maturity. They're the type of people who insist on calling their hardback Green Lantern comic a 'graphic novel' because they have a complex about their hobby. See also 'epic fiction' in place of 'fantasy books'. There's been a bit of a turnaround lately though, and none too soon. DC says they can't give Wonder Woman her own film because the story is 'too complex' so she has to be a second-tier character in the next Superman. Meanwhile Marvel's next big film has a raccoon with a gun and a skinhead girl and Andy from Parks and Rec and looks amazing for it.

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So came back from seeing this with a mate and the conclusion we both came to was that it was......ok. It was nowhere near the fuckin disaster that the Total Recall remake was thankfully and their were elements I liked about it. I liked that they kept the satire and The Novak Element was a fun spin on something like Bill O'Reilly. I liked both Gary Oldmans and Michael Keatons performances as well.

But it was just so.....bland. The action was piss poor, there wasn't much of it and it was like they spent so much time with Murphy and ramming his family down your throat that they then forgot they had to actually have a plot later in the film. The bad guys were non existent and overall pretty terrible.

I think it says a lot to how good the first film was and how good a director Paul Verhoeven is that he made a brilliant satire, a brilliant action film and a brilliant character with Murphy. It also says a lot about Peter Wellers performance that the scene in the house where he's remembering about his past is better than anything they try to do 'emotionally' in the remake. There's so many quotable lines, memorable moments, it's very much to me a perfect film. I can't really remember much about the remake an hour after seeing it.

So definitely not a complete failure but it just feels all 'what's the point ?'

Also, at least it's better than the Total Recall remake.

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I was thinking about villains and have seen many mention how bland they are in this remake.

The original had two exceptional bad guys but something struck me how utterly bad ass Clarence Boddicker truly was - in the bitches leave scene. That comment is totally throwaway (but cold). But think on this - he lets the hookers go, he is about to kill Bob Morton. He knows those hookers could id him - especially when the news would later reveal that Morton is dead in a bizarre explosion and also had bullet wounds to the leg - but he simply DOES NOT GIVE A FUCK.

Hardcore, motherfuckers.

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I distinctly remember Batman Begins being the first time "reboot" started being thrown about.

According to the Wikipedia, it's the third official "reboot" after Texas Chainsaw Massacre and The Punisher. So Batman Begins is probably is the movie that popularised the term. Interestingly all reboots have been sci-fi or horror movies. The geek dollar.

A re-imagining is just a pretentious way of saying remake.

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I was thinking about villains and have seen many mention how bland they are in this remake.

The original had two exceptional bad guys but something struck me how utterly bad ass Clarence Boddicker truly was - in the bitches leave scene. That comment is totally throwaway (but cold). But think on this - he lets the hookers go, he is about to kill Bob Morton. He knows those hookers could id him - especially when the news would later reveal that Morton is dead in a bizarre explosion and also had bullet wounds to the leg - but he simply DOES NOT GIVE A FUCK.

Hardcore, motherfuckers.

Plus they're off their tits on coke. (And the coke's done off their tits)

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I was thinking about villains and have seen many mention how bland they are in this remake.

The original had two exceptional bad guys but something struck me how utterly bad ass Clarence Boddicker truly was - in the bitches leave scene. That comment is totally throwaway (but cold). But think on this - he lets the hookers go, he is about to kill Bob Morton. He knows those hookers could id him - especially when the news would later reveal that Morton is dead in a bizarre explosion and also had bullet wounds to the leg - but he simply DOES NOT GIVE A FUCK.

Hardcore, motherfuckers.

Or it's a hole in the story they didn't think of.

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Or it's a hole in the story they didn't think of.

Yes, for every character trait that's evident from actually watching the film, we should first find out if "they" actually meant to convey that by searching for interviews and other pieces of evidence. Otherwise it's just not there and we're only imagining it.

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I was thinking about villains and have seen many mention how bland they are in this remake.

The original had two exceptional bad guys but something struck me how utterly bad ass Clarence Boddicker truly was - in the bitches leave scene. That comment is totally throwaway (but cold). But think on this - he lets the hookers go, he is about to kill Bob Morton. He knows those hookers could id him - especially when the news would later reveal that Morton is dead in a bizarre explosion and also had bullet wounds to the leg - but he simply DOES NOT GIVE A FUCK.

Hardcore, motherfuckers.

I think I may have mentioned this in this long and old thread but I can't be bothered searching. One of my favourite behind the scenes stories is that when filming that scene Verhoeven, due to his flimsy English at that time, didn't really realise the implication of the word bitch and was using it to refer to the actresses while directing, so you had him going "Ya, ya, you go over there now bitch!" while Kurtwood Smith and Miguel Ferrer were laughing like schoolboys in the corner.

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I think it says a lot to how good the first film was and how good a director Paul Verhoeven is that he made a brilliant satire, a brilliant action film and a brilliant character with Murphy. It also says a lot about Peter Wellers performance that the scene in the house where he's remembering about his past is better than anything they try to do 'emotionally' in the remake. There's so many quotable lines, memorable moments, it's very much to me a perfect film. I can't really remember much about the remake an hour after seeing it.

Good chat about Robocop (and the others, with the remake to follow in future) with the Redlettermedia guys:

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Let's see if the hat still fits.

Robocop opened on Wednesday to a lackluster $2.8M (though to be fair, North America is taking a battering from the weather). It took the top spot from the much celebrated Lego Movie but couldn't hold on to it for more than 24 hours (TLM was only $700K behind Robocop on Wednesday). By Thursday, Robocop had slipped down to second place with $2.1M. Making things worse is the addition on Friday of the About Last Night remake, which is expected to slot into second for the weekend as a whole, leaving The Lego Movie at the top, and Robocop in third (unless the two other movies released on Friday break out). Given that the flick cost $100M to produce, and was estimated by Sony to make $35M (now looking closer to $25M) for the long weekend, it has everything to work at.

The best comparison is the 2012 remake of Total Recall, which opened on a Friday to $9M, ending up with around $25M for its first three days. A disappointing figure for sure, made all the worse by the film collapsing a week later and ending its North American run with only $58M. Its performance oversea may have helped but not by nearly enough. Rumours suggested TR2012 cost north of $200M, though Sony only ever admitted to $125M in costs. With a $198M total, even if it did cost $125M, it was still some way short of profitability.

Robocop's PG-13 probably won't do the film any harm in the long run and may mean it can attract some of the lucrative teen market who have little to nothing invested in the original. However, About Last Night, Endless Love and Winter's Tale (all out on February 14th) will impact further into its weekend box office. Next week things won't get any easier with the release of Pompeii and Three Days to Kill, both of which will seek to target much of Robocop's demographic. Further ahead, if the film gets that long, it will face such titles as Non-Stop, Need for Speed and 300: Rise of an Empire. Unless it breaks out, which is unlikely given that start and the lukewarm reviews and word of mouth, the new future of law enforcement will be lucky to see Total Recall's $58M domestic total.

Overseas, things are a little better, with Robocop having so far made around $28M from twenty five or so territories. Like a number of remakes, it falls into a odd placing. The fans of the original won't turn out in their droves - not only because of the bad taste the remake has given them, but also because the original is over 25 years old. Fans of that first film are not the main cinema-going demographic and would have been unlikely to have made that much difference even they had showed up in numbers. Consequently, because of the film's age, the key 14-20 year old group have nothing invested unless they liked what they saw in the trailers.

Like the Total Recall remake, Robocop looks to have made little impact and will likely be forgotten in month's time.

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$7M for Friday in the US. It actually ended up in fourth place behind Endless Love ($7.3M) and About Last Night ($13M). Had they skipped a Wednesday release, it might have had a better debut. Mendelson reckons it'll end up with around $65M in North America but do much better overseas.

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$7M for Friday in the US. It actually ended up in fourth place behind Endless Love ($7.3M) and About Last Night ($13M). Had they skipped a Wednesday release, it might have had a better debut. Mendelson reckons it'll end up with around $65M in North America but do much better overseas.

Stellar word-of-mouth will surely help it. I'd be surprised if it didn't have a strong second week hold.
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I don't really know to be honest. I think it is just the way cinema is going in general. The US market is becoming less and less important in terms of revenue. There could be the social media aspect too, but I'm not sure how big an impact that would have (and if it does work, there's also the negative aspect that a film could be condemned across the internet before it hits the US).

Obviously the idea is get almost all major territories receiving the film on the same day, give or take, and while that is vastly improved, it still doesn't happen for every film (part of that reason is so prints used in country X can be shipped to country Y as opposed to them both having their own prints).

There could also be a scheduling thing as well, where a film is better released at a certain time with say, less competition. Robocop probably felt like decent alternative programming to Endless Love/About Last Night than up against the debut frame of The Lego Movie.

But certainly, places like the UK can often get a film a week or so ahead of the US. Sometimes longer.

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