Jump to content

Umd Pricing Announced..


Major Britten
 Share

Recommended Posts

I was thinking about this the other day. What's going to happen when the PSP dies? Surely by pushing the UMD movie side so hard Sony will be forced into using the UMD as the format for PSP2. Surely they won't just ditch it. It'd be great after buying all those movies to be told they're useless after one generation.

Good point.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Though completely at odds with everything else going HD...

Not really, UMD is already an unlikely success as a format (over 20 mil sales and only 8 million of those are games so far) and all Sony has to do is find a way that you can use umd discs with the ps3, and you could get a machine that will play umd discs and blu-ray discs for less than half the price of a hd dvd player.

It makes perfect sense really because the movie may be displayed on the psp at a low resolution but they are actually stored on the discs at a resolution of 720 pixels by 480 pixels. Plus sooner or later there will be audio only umd discs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not really, UMD is already an unlikely success as a format (over 20 mil sales and only 8 million of those are games so far) and all Sony has to do is find a way that you can use umd discs with the ps3, and you could get a machine that will play umd discs and blu-ray discs for less than half the price of a hd dvd player.

It makes perfect sense really because the movie may be displayed on the psp at a low resolution but they are actually stored on the discs at a resolution of 720 pixels by 480 pixels. Plus sooner or later there will be audio only umd discs.

I imagine they'll want you to use a PSP or similar as a UMD drive for the PS3. And the resolution thing - it's really stored at that resolution? That's certainly unexpected, and could actually make them a more popular format if the right devices are made available.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Surely they're not stored at 720x480. A lot of reviews complain about the poor picture quality and that's on a tiny screen. Playing them on a big screen would be useless.

Having a portable device that just played UMDs would be pointless too because of portable DVD players.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I imagine they'll want you to use a PSP or similar as a UMD drive for the PS3. And the resolution thing - it's really stored at that resolution? That's certainly unexpected, and could actually make them a more popular format if the right devices are made available.

Yeah, its stored on the disc at the same res as a normal dvd.

Here's a link in case anyone thinks I'm making it up

http://www.pspbrew.com/wiki/index.php/UMD_Format

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Surely they're not stored at 720x480. A lot of reviews complain about the poor picture quality and that's on a tiny screen. Playing them on a big screen would be useless.

Having a portable device that just played UMDs would be pointless too because of portable DVD players.

Who has complained about poor picture quality? They're very very good in that respect.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Who has complained about poor picture quality?  They're very very good in that respect.

Well IGN is the only place I know that reviews them so
In difference to the DVD release, the transfer for the UMD is lacking in a few key areas. While the horror movie is intentionally dark in places, the UMD transfer is so dark in places you can't even see what is going on, and everything blends in together. To make matters worse, the colors are extremely washed out and the contrast on the print is turned up so high that the blacks look grey.

The transfer is also very grainy, but I believe that's more of an issue with the style the production crew was going for rather than a transfer problem.

Score: 4 out of 10

The video transfer isn't too impressive. It still looks good, but nothing close to the sharpness and detail in newer releases such as National Treasure and Pirates of the Caribbean. T2 may be over ten years old, but I still think a better transfer is available. I didn't have a proper TV to compare against the DVD, but even on an average TV the T2 Ultimate Edition was clearer with less edge enhancement than its PSP counterpart. The PSP does not offer the sharpness you'd expect from such an effects-heavy release and some of the CGI sequences (such as the T-1000 morphing) reveal transfer flaws. The colors are also on the dull side.

Score: 4 out of 10

The video has been modified somewhat to fit the PSP screen, meaning there is cropping of scenes, although not as drastic as a pan-and-scan or fullscreen version of a DVD movie. There isn't bad compression here, but the colors seem pretty washed-out in the transfer. We've seen much better on the format. In addition, the picture sometimes has problems with blur during the frantic action sequences.

Score: 6 out of 10

Although the bright colors come through clearly on the transfer, this is not the best video we've seen from a UMD. There is some grain and pixellation apparent, especially in outdoor scenes, and when the action really picks up, the motion blur can get annoying.

Score: 7 out of 10

So it's not the quality of the discs, it's the quality of a lot of the transfers that seems to be a problem. These deficiencies will only be amplified on a larger screen.

Althought this review

This movie is in a unique ratio of 1.66, which means you will get some extremely tiny bars on the left and right of the screen...small enough that you probably wouldn't notice them unless you're looking.

Now, I have seen over forty UMD movies. There are many that I can list that have great sound, many that have great extras, but very few that I can say have a perfect video transfer. In fact, it seems companies have the hardest time transferring their movies to UMD when it comes to picture quality, as you can have grayish blacks that makes the film muddy (such as with National Treasure) or poor coloring that doesn't allow the movie to really leap out of the PSP screen (such as with Robots).

But The Nightmare Before Christmas has the most beautiful transfer I have seen so far on UMD. The black levels are solid and deep, which is crucial for a movie that takes place at night half the time. The film is so detailed and sharp that I could pause the screen and just take in all the small touches of the set detail and design. And the colors...oh man, the colors! Just wait until you see Oogie Boogie's neon lair, which has some of the most vivid shades I've ever seen on the PSP.

It was a tragedy that The Nightmare Before Christmas never got an anamorphic transfer on DVD, but this is one of the rare occasions that the UMD surpasses the DVD in terms of picture quality. I am completely floored.

Score: 10 out of 10

Shows that it is just a problem with the transder and not the media. It just requires other studies to become as competent.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would take one of the "reviews" on ign with a grain of salt tbh considering how many people there are ranking 50 Cent: Bulletpoof as the game of the century.

It either blurs during action scenes or it doesn't, video quality is not really opinion based. Unless your one of those people who can't tell the difference between standard and high definition.

magoo.jpg

EDIT - and they gave 50 cent a 6.5, so where's all the love you were talking about.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes but video quality is not really opinion based. It either blurs during action scenes or it doesn't. Unless your one of those people who can't tell the difference between standard and high definition.

Unless any perceived image quality problem is actually down to the screen and not the actual image. If I watch a Blu-Ray movie on a 1940s TV, I'm not going to say Blu-Ray is shit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've the quality though and it's crisp with no blurring.

Eh? You've got the quality? Nice to know.
Unless any perceived image quality problem is actually down to the screen and not the actual image. If I watch a Blu-Ray movie on a 1940s TV, I'm not going to say Blu-Ray is shit.

Indeed but Nightmare proves that it's the transfers that have been poor, not the storage medium or display device. So any UMD displayed on a bigger screen will amplify these problems because it's the actual transfer that is bad. I'd love to see Nightmare on a large screen if it's an improvement over the DVD version.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Eh? You've got the quality? Nice to know.

Indeed but Nightmare proves that it's the transfers that have been poor, not the storage medium or display device. So any UMD displayed on a bigger screen will amplify these problems because it's the actual transfer that is bad. I'd love to see Nightmare on a large screen if it's an improvement over the DVD version.

I've seen it I meant :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was thinking about this the other day. What's going to happen when the PSP dies? Surely by pushing the UMD movie side so hard Sony will be forced into using the UMD as the format for PSP2. Surely they won't just ditch it. It'd be great after buying all those movies to be told they're useless after one generation.

Good point.

Bad point.

As if Sony would make a UMD v.2 (for PSP2/whatever) that wouldn't be backwards compatible :wub:

Anyway: UMD's would only interest me if:

* they're about €15 or less

* included @ a small premium with some special edition DVD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.