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Watching starsuckers now, and boy does it make for depressing viewing. Of course it's brilliant and informative, but I'm getting a bit sick of stuff like this and Brooker's Newswipe seemingly having no effect on our collective ability to discern fact from fiction - it's like nobody wants to know.

Naturally, I think better of the sorts who visit RLLMUK, but let's be honest; we're in the minority, aren't we? Besides, people scarcely have time to decide what clothes to put on in the morning, much less use multiple sources to arrive at a more balanced and truthful reporting.

:lol:

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Sounding good, got it on my Sky+, just need to find the time to watch it now.

Preacher, you talk about it being like no one wanting to know, I don't think it helps that this sort of stuff and Newswipe are tucked away on the slighly more obscure channels. Lets face it ITV are never going to show something like this on primetime as they are part of the problem.

Its a sad state of affairs.

I only found out about this film at the weekend when I saw and advert for the DVD in Total Film, I then checked out the website. I was thinking of ordering it up after reading the website and then I got the daily email from the TVBite website that noted that it was on last night.

Not exactly the simplist way of finding out about a film.

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I watched the National Geographic's 6-part 'Apocalypse World War II' series mentioned earlier in this thread this week and it's a real eye opener - some amazing (though graphic) footage and simplistic use of maps and graphics makes it incredibly watchable. Definitely worth tracking down.

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I watched the National Geographic's 6-part 'Apocalypse World War II' series mentioned earlier in this thread this week and it's a real eye opener - some amazing (though graphic) footage and simplistic use of maps and graphics makes it incredibly watchable. Definitely worth tracking down.

Yeah I've been watching the series for quite some time now. Constantly repeating it so I get the facts straight. I've seen it at my local media store on Blu-ray for about 30 Euros and I'm thinking about picking it up.

EDIT: Is there any way to watch Starsuckers on 4OD when you're located outside the UK?

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I watched the National Geographic's 6-part 'Apocalypse World War II' series mentioned earlier in this thread this week and it's a real eye opener - some amazing (though graphic) footage and simplistic use of maps and graphics makes it incredibly watchable. Definitely worth tracking down.

Watched the first 2 episodes the other night and it's excellent stuff. The archive footage is spellbinding; I've read no end of books and been to various museums but it really brings home in film how "real" WW2 was. I can't recommend the documentaries enough

I was chatting with my Dad (born in 1939) about it recently. Everything about it defies my comprehension, yet it's so unbelievably recent in human history. Even ignoring the Holocaust, which is rightly beyond any sane human thinking, take the fact that the Poles tried to battle against the Germans on horseback - this is in my father's lifetime. Totally brainscrambling.

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Did anybody watch 'Not quite hollywood' on film 4 last night. 2 Hours about Ozploitation cinema i the 80's, when the government allowed you to write off 150% of your production budget against tax!

Some great anecdotes, awesome footage and just a really entertaining couple of hours.

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I watched it. On the whole it was a decent documentary but there was almost too much to cover in a single documentary. Nice to see mentions for Wake in Fright, The Long Weekend (which I see has recently been remade) and The Man from Hong Kong. I need to track down a copy of Next of Kin too which looked pretty good.

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I watched it. On the whole it was a decent documentary but there was almost too much to cover in a single documentary. Nice to see mentions for Wake in Fright, The Long Weekend (which I see has recently been remade) and The Man from Hong Kong. I need to track down a copy of Next of Kin too which looked pretty good.

Heh, I grabbed Next of Kin straight away after that. And tonight i'm watching Roadgames. Don't bother with The long Weekend remake, its fairly pointless.

I agree there was too much to cover. Would have liked maybe a 4 parter, with an hour on smut, an hour on gore etc. But its not often you watch a 2 hour doc and go 'man I wish that was 4 hours' so in that regard it was a storming success.

Also recommend 'Love the beast' and 'Bra Boys' for more antipodian culture action.

Love the Beast is about Eric Banas fascination with car racing and him trying to compete in the Tasmanian rally in the first car he ever owned.

Bra Boys is about the history of the notorious Meroubra Surf community and its clashes with the law over the years.

I have a fascination with Australian culture as it is this weird hybrid of British, American and completely isolated thinking that makes me nostalgic for a place and way of life I have no part of. Its weird.

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Sounding good, got it on my Sky+, just need to find the time to watch it now.

Preacher, you talk about it being like no one wanting to know, I don't think it helps that this sort of stuff and Newswipe are tucked away on the slighly more obscure channels. Lets face it ITV are never going to show something like this on primetime as they are part of the problem.

Its a sad state of affairs.

I only found out about this film at the weekend when I saw and advert for the DVD in Total Film, I then checked out the website. I was thinking of ordering it up after reading the website and then I got the daily email from the TVBite website that noted that it was on last night.

Not exactly the simplist way of finding out about a film.

You're absolutely right of course, but considering both the shows I mentioned were screened on publicly-funded channels, I dunno...I just expect more of them in terms of getting people watching. Actually, I think Channel 4 handled starsuckers far better than the BBC dealt with Newswipe, and they're only partially funded by taxpayer's money, I think.

Dunno. It's just frustrating, I guess.

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I may have missed it but has anyone mentioned Rory Stewart's excellent doc's on Lawrence of Arabia (now sadly gone from the iPlayer)???

I found these fascinating - Stewart clearly wanted to be Lawrence but this doesn't harm his ability to tell a decent story...

I'm sure we've all seen the film (epic as it is) but it's much more interesting to hear the real story (the film is largely fiction strung onto a thin skeleton of truths).

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Wener Herzog is making a 3D documentary of the 30,000-year-old cave artwork at Chauvet in France.

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/filmblog/20...-documentary-3d

:facepalm:

I love that these paintings have survived 30,000 years but they can't let anyone in with "lights which generate heat" nor can anyone touch the walls or floor...

It's like spa water which has filtered through rocks for 100s of years but goes out of date in your fridge after 3 days :)

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Watched the cove last night and thought it was wonderful. Not overly sentimental or manipulative, just straight up story of a bunch of men on a mission. Made a really good point of slowly revealing all angles of the argument by taking in Japans national pride, the quality of dolphin meat and the control of whaling rules around the world and how Japan navigate around it. Great documentary

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Great thread, I fucking love me some documentaries!

Came in here to say The Cove as it's the most recent thing I've seen and a worthy Oscar winner.

I'd also like to recommend anything by Adam Curtis, it's really conscience-raising stuff. The main series are great, but the one-off like '25 Million pounds' and 'The Way of All Flesh' are excellent as well.

Other good stuff I've watched recently are 'The Great Offices of State', about the Home, Foreign and Treasury offices and 'The Love of Money' about the global financial crisis. I also saw a documentary called 'Murder on the Lake' about the mysterious death of conservationist Joan Root in Kenya in 2006.

A classic documentary worth seeing is 'The War Room' about the Democrats campaign to elect Bill Clinton. It's amazing to see the similarity between the Obama campaign and also how little the main issues in America have changed over the past 15 years. This also links with a recent documentary called 'Our Brand Is Crisis' which also has James Carville in it and covers the 2002 elections in Bolivia.

OK, one more! If you can find it (and the subtitles) try to find 'Comandante' where Oliver Stone follows Fidel Castro around for a few days interviewing him - really interesting stuff.

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Just watched this:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00qp...ls_Comedy_Club/

Kim Jong Ils Comedy Club.

Amazing and terrifying peep behind the last iron curtain..North Korea.

Sort of a Dogme Inspired Orwellian expose.

There is a scene at a demonstration in Pyongnang that is just mindblowing.

Simply brilliant.

Please watch before it goes.

Anyone know where I can watch (get) this from, now that I've missed it? Would love to see it!

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  • 3 weeks later...

Any seen/mentioned this? I'm about to grab it from Newzbin -

Tales from The Script

Few modern art forms are as misunderstood as the craft of screenwriting, because the collaborative nature of filmmaking and the dominance of celebrity actors and directors obscures the contributions of screenwriters. So if you’re a writer eager to break into Hollywood or simply a movie buff excited to hear the stories behind your favorite films, this unique nonfiction book/documentary film project will captivate you with insights into the wild and mysterious world of Hollywood screenwriting.

Enjoy inside conversations with the men and women who dreamed up some of the world’s most beloved movie characters. Learn how they surmounted the incredible odds against breaking into Hollywood, and discover the myriad ways in which they transformed their ideas into films that topped the box office, launched the careers of major stars, and earned them Oscars. The stories behind the storytellers are as exciting, surprising, and inspirational as the narratives of their celebrated films.

Revel in the exploits of Shane Black (Lethal Weapon), John Carpenter (Halloween), Frank Darabont (The Shawshank Redemption), Nora Ephron (When Harry Met Sally...), William Goldman (The Princess Bride), David Hayter (Watchmen), Paul Mazursky (An Unmarried Woman), Bruce Joel Rubin (Ghost), Paul Schrader (Taxi Driver), Ron Shelton (Bull Durham), and dozens of other Hollywood writers. For the full list, click here.

In addition to name-brand talents, Tales from the Script features newcomers whose stories prove that talented people can write their way into the top ranks of the movie industry. There’s Justin Zackham, who decided to write one last script before giving up on his flagging movie career; the script became The Bucket List, a sleeper hit starring Morgan Freeman and Jack Nicholson. There’s Ari B. Rubin, a second-generation screenwriter who skipped his law-school entry exam to finish a screenplay that got optioned by Robert Redford. There’s Duncan Tucker, who scraped together money from real-estate ventures, friends, and family to make Transamerica, the bold story about gender issues that netted leading lady Felicity Huffman an Oscar nomination.

Tales from the Script puts readers into the trenches of the Hollywood development process through colorful stories about Harrison Ford, Morgan Freeman, Adam Sandler, Joel Silver, Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, and many more. Entertaining, startling, and uplifting, this collection is a pure pleasure for those who dream of writing the Great American Screenplay—it’s a master class taught by those who made that dream come true.

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Really enjoyed the above documentary. I'm not sure it tells us anything most of us don't already know about screenwriting/writers (you're treated like crap, you might get lucky) but it was a fascinating watch. What I like was that many of the writers were very open and honest about the craft but also about the realisation that it's just words on a page and getting them changed by someone else isn't the end of the world.

The very short Uwe Boll story (by the woman who wrote Bloodrayne) offers a perfect insight into his film making. I think it's worth a watch even if you've not got much of an interest in writing. Like I said, it won't teach you anything new, but is well worth a watch.

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