Jump to content

The Watchtower - A thread for all comics


biglime
 Share

Recommended Posts

I only ever read the first few issues of Nextwave actually. I'll put it next on the list.

And cheers for the suggestions sexton! Lots of good stuff there. I've read Brubakers Captain America and pretty much ALL of the modern Daredevil (Bendis/Brubaker/Waid) though. Great suggestions though, as they are both amazing books. Hickman's FF run is another one I forgot to list. Excellent stuff and really turned around my opinion of Marvel's first family. Thor: God of Thunder did the same thing for me too- I was never fussed on Thor as a character before that.

I'm curious about Amazing Spider-man, though it was one of those books were I was always unsure about where to start (again) with it. Any particular issue or storyline that would provide a good jumping on point?

New Avengers looks great too, so that's going on the list as well.

Any other recent X-books that people would particularly recommend too?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All New X-Men is the continuing story of the original young X-Men brought to the future. I hope they find a reason to never have to send them back. They're currently lost in the Ultimate Universe. Uncanny Avengers is worth a read too. Also Wolverine & The X-Men. The original run gets a little derailed by events too often but it's a good, solid and fun read.

I read Lazarus volume 1 last night and immediately moved onto the second volume. It's rather good.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Amazing Spider-Man 648 is the start of Big Time & runs until issue 700. You can safely ignore the stuff before that. There's a bit of a crossover when he joins FF at a point, but if you've read that then you'll know what to expect.

Though if you want the best Spider-Man then issues 1-38 by Stan Lee & Steve Ditko can never be topped!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you're looking for some recent-ish X-men comics I'd recommned X-Men Legacy by Simon Spurrier. Only downside has been the interior artwork (the cover work however by Del Mundo is incredible). If you like that, then there's also the new X-Force series he's writing which I've heard good things about but have yet to start on. And his Six-Gun Gorilla mini-series for a bonus unrelated but still totally good thing to read all in one neat little 6 issue trade.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the recommendations folks! I've started on Amazing Spider-Man and am thoroughly enjoying it. Cheers!

Also, a big yes to Lazarus from me too. I picked up the Image humble bundle a few months ago and apart from the amazing titles I'd already checked out (Saga, Manhattan Projects, Fatale) this really blew me away. Though I think I'm going to hold fire and buy a nice big hardcover of it in a year or two!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For those that are enjoying Lazarus, you should really check out other Rucka works.

Stumptown is Ruckas's take on American detective fiction and is influenced by things such as Rockford Files, Raymnond Chandler and Magnum PI!! It is of course, great. Also, Queen and Country. British MI5 spy thriller which is a bit like Spooks but much more betterer. Pretty sure I read that Ellen Page had been tapped to play the lead in the film version that seems to have now disappeared.

His work on Gotham Central with Ed Brubaker are also some of the best Batman stories not to feature Batman. Why oh why oh why oh why it wasn't used as the basis of 'Gotham' instead of cack-handed approach they seem to have taken I'm not sure I'll ever understand.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice, I hadn't read any of them. Is Gotham Central crime orientated or does it feature other super heroes / villains? If it's more about crime and so on then I might check it out.

Image comics are so far ahead of the pack at the moment it's kind of ridiculous- Lazarus, Revival, Saga, Stray Bullets, Walking Dead, Invincible, East of West etc etc...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's basically the Gotham PD having to deal with the B-list villains (Mr Freeze is the first one they come up against, and whilst he seems like a joke when up against Batman, he's absolutely fucking lethal with normal people) and mopping up the messes Batman leaves behind. It's fucking ace.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I get my comics in twice a month bundles posted from a comic shop in London because I'm too bone to pay attention to when comics come out and go to town so apologies if I'm behind.

Ms Mavel continues to be amazing. Totally amazing. Issue 08 even has Marty McFly in the background in a panel. Aces.

Skottie Young's Rocket Racoon is still ace as well, snappily written and stunning to look at.

Got to go through Star Lord 3 (the series is ok, I might ditch it) and The Wicked and The Divine 4 (the series is as ace as you'd expect from Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kurt Busiek wrote some forum posts about the Kirby estate's recent settlement with Marvel. They're a very good summary of the background behind it.

http://community.comicbookresources.com/showthread.php?19301-Marvel-amp-Jack-Kirby-Family-Settle-Long-Running-Legal-Dispute&p=552706&viewfull=1#post552706

Here's some of it:

At that point, what they had was a legal argument: The Kirbys were saying Kirby had sold the rights to his work to Marvel, and could therefore, under the law, revert it. Marvel said Kirby was a work-for-hire employee, and therefore had never owned the rights at all, and thus couldn't revert the rights.


That's the crux of this case. It's not about whether Kirby knew Marvel got all rights -- both work-for-hire and an all-rights-sale would give Marvel all rights anyway. It's about whether Kirby owned the rights and sold them, or whether he was just an employee, and Marvel owned all his ideas before they even came out of the pencil.



This is key: An all-rights sale says I own this thing and I sell all the rights to you. Hey, wanna buy a picture? I own it and have the right to sell it to you. I can sell you all publishing rights, and if you want to make a movie of it, go ahead. That's an all-rights sale.



But a work-for-hire deal says you're hiring me to draw that picture, which means I never own it, and am not actually selling you the rights, because you already own them. I'm just employed to make a drawing for you, but it was always your drawing, never ever my property.



The distinction between those two is crucial: An all-rights sale can be reverted, because there was a rights transfer to revert. A work-for-hire deal can't.



But knowing which is which isn't all that simple. If I write a POWER MAN & IRON FIST script, and show it to Marvel, and they say they want to buy it, then that's not work-for-hire, because I created it before they saw it, and thus they can't possibly have hired me on a WFH basis. This means that POWER MAN/IRON FIST #90 is not a work-for-hire, because that's how that particular issue happened. Marvel and I have signed a contract that pretends otherwise, but legally it's impossible for it to be work-for-hire.



These days, companies are careful (or try to be) about the legalities -- they want contracts signed before work commences, or else it isn't work for hire. The reason none of George Perez's JLA/AVENGERS commissions were in the book collection is that because he did them as commissions for fans and not under a Marvel or DC contract, then they can't be called work for hire and DC didn't want to publish them under non-wfh terms. It's a narrow distinction, but it's a hugely important one.



So don't listen to anyone who tries to tell you that IP contracts are like agreeing to walk someone's dog, or that if you sell a pizza you can't get royalties years later. Copyright isn't dog-walking and it's not pizza. It's governed by a whole different set of laws, so all those analogies are bad ones.



There's a legitimate argument to be made on both sides -- and it's one that's especially hard to get real evidence on because Marvel can't produce any paperwork from those days, there often was none, and most of the people around then are dead. Those few who aren't, like Stan and his brother, are perhaps a bit biased, and Stan's famous for having a terrible memory besides.



Most of this boils down to what counts as work-for-hire employment. Most measures of that, in the past, would have regarded Kirby as an independent contractor, because he worked at home, bought his own supplies, didn't get a salary or vacation pay or health care, and that if he did work that Marvel didn't want to publish, he didn't get paid for it.*



*This last bit is disputed; Stan says Kirby got paid for everything, but has no paperwork to prove it and since Kirby was able to sell stuff he submitted to Marvel to other publishers without Marvel complaining about it, it would seem that both he and Marvel considered it his property, and not a work for hire that he never had rights to at all.



So Marvel's argument is that everybody knew it was work for hire, and because Marvel assigned Kirby work and paid him whether the work was accepted or not, then that makes it work for hire. The Kirby Estate's argument is that no, everybody didn't know it was work for hire, and because Kirby made up stuff on his own and didn't get paid for rejected work, he was an independent contractor making an all-rights sale, which is now revertible under the law.



[The argument that "everybody knew" it was work for hire is a particularly bad one, to my mind, because the term "work for hire" wasn't commonly used back then, and there was no practical difference between an all-rights sale and a work-for-hire deal back then anyway; it wasn't until they changed the law so that one is revertible and the other isn't that they gained a practical distinction. So how would anyone (much less everyone) know, back then, that there was this key distinction that didn't actually make a lick of difference and wouldn't until years later when Congress changed the law?]



[And even Marvel clearly didn't "know" everything was work for hire, because some of their early surviving back-of-check contracts specifically say that the artist is assigning all rights to Marvel, which makes it a sale, not a work for hire. So how could "everyone know" the terms when even Marvel's contracts had them wrong?]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So I want to read Superior Spider-man.

Should I start at amazing #698 or back at #648 as suggested back a page or so?

Or can I jump right in?

I'm thinking about opening a comixology account and buying through them.

I would sign up to a marvel unlimited account but there doesn't seem to be an offline windows solution (for my win8.1 tablet).

How well does the app do on a phone for when I'm without signal when I'm out and about (tube journeys etc)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jump straight in with #1. Only go back if you want to fill in some of the details for yourself. There are some good issues in that stretch but nothing essential for Superior Spider-man. #698-700 are scene-setting for Superior as well but again the only thing you need to know is there's been a body swap.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jumped back into comics after a bit of a break. Started with Civil War and The Initiative story arcs.

Iron Man is a dick

Namor/Black Pantcher/Cap are all great

and I really really liked the Punisher issues. 'i'm going to shoot him in the face'

and jeez they really did drag that one out. Still not sure what the purpose of the Moon Knight comic inclusion was.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So I finished off the Death of Wolverine series last night and it's hard to know how I feel about it.

On one hand, I can applaud it's small scale but on the other, you're left with a real "THAT'S IT?" moment at the end. The big villian reveal is something we've seen a million times before in Wolvie's past and done better too.

Having said, that I did like they way they chose to kill him off.

Who knew that being covered head to toe in molten adamantium could look so beautiful?

Now it's just a waiting game for his burned out healing factor to kick back in, resuscitate him inside his cocoon and for someone to bust him out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The new Sabrina comic is pretty good- Roberto Aguirre-Sacsa is pulling the same trick he did with Afterlife with Archie, only this time it seems to be going for more of a sixties horror movie vibe to it, partially due to the great artwork by Robert Hack. Odd to think that two of the best horror comics out have sprung from the Archie universe.

SAB-1-4-80da1.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So I finished off the Death of Wolverine series last night and it's hard to know how I feel about it.

On one hand, I can applaud it's small scale but on the other, you're left with a real "THAT'S IT?" moment at the end. The big villian reveal is something we've seen a million times before in Wolvie's past and done better too.

Having said, that I did like they way they chose to kill him off.

Who knew that being covered head to toe in molten adamantium could look so beautiful?

Now it's just a waiting game for his burned out healing factor to kick back in, resuscitate him inside his cocoon and for someone to bust him out.

Is it in DOW4 or Logan's Legacy where you find out a little bit more about what you've spoilered?

Leave it with me and i will have a butchers at lunch for the page.

But i feel almost the same way about the ending of DOW.

Also no-one look at the cover to the weekly "Wolverines 1" if you haven't read DOW4 as theres the fucking end spoiler right there on the cover.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, Sabrina's off to a promising start, really digging how it's still basically Sabrina from what I remember from the show - the fussy aunts, the sardonic cat, casting some ludicrous spell to make some guy fancy her - but with a delightfully sinister edge to it.

Did anyone check out Deadpool & Hawkeye? I couldn't stop laughing when I saw Kate's outfit. Amazing facial expressions in it as well.

Ennis' space horror series Caliban finished last week, I'd recommend checking it out. Basically riffing on Alien mainly, with nods to The Thing and bodysnatcher tales. It's solid with some good creepy moments.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is it in DOW4 or Logan's Legacy where you find out a little bit more about what you've spoilered?

If you mean the image it's DOW4, last page. If you mean the healing factor thing, it's explained in whatever run's being going for the last year.

I didn't follow it, I just jumped in with DOW1 and wiki'd the backstory.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bathroom's going to be pretty hard to beat. :(

sound1.jpg

Ennis' space horror series Caliban finished last week, I'd recommend checking it out. Basically riffing on Alien mainly, with nods to The Thing and bodysnatcher tales. It's solid with some good creepy moments.

Didn't realise the last issue was out, was thinking the other day that it'd been a while since I'd read a new issue. Could have done with the characters being a bit more memorable and holding back a bit longer on the scares, but I enjoyed Ennis' version of sci-fi... is it a good ending..?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.