Jump to content
biglime

The Watchtower - A thread for all comics

Recommended Posts

@womblingfree I highly recommend Jonathan Hickman's Fantastic Four run, which continues in his subsequent Avengers run, and concludes in his Secret Wars series. 'Epic' has been seldom used as appropriately as when describing this three part run.

 

Saladin Ahmed's Black Bolt limited series is seriously excellent

 

Is Punisher Max on Unlimited? If so, everything by Garth Ennis. All the Punisher Max issues he's written, his one-shots, limited series, and the Barracuda spin-off. 

 

While Punisher Max features no superheroes at all, being set in its own universe away from standard Marvel, Ennis has also written bog-standard Marvel Punisher. Not as brilliant as Max, but still good. Start with the Welcome Back Frank limited series and continue with the ongoing series written by Ennis.

 

I also have a soft spot for Chip Zdarsky's Howard the Duck. If you happen to have that acquired taste, check out Zdarsky's Peter Parker: Spectacular Spider-Man run, less focus on funny but the same breezy writing style.

 

Tom King's Vision limited series is a must. Simply brilliant.

 

That's all I can think of right now :D

 

 

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, womblingfree said:

Right, so I've binged and caught up on about thirty years of X-Men. Read all the X-23 stuff, Death of Logan, old Man Logan, Civil War1 & 2, Planet Hulk, WW Hulk, and gotten a handle on the multiverse and Spiderverse stuff.

 

Is there anything else major I need to read before cancelling Marvel Unlimited again? Currently just got All New Wolverine to read which is great.

Hickman's Fantastic Four is amazing and his Avengers run gets a lot of love, but I found it a bit cold and lacking in humour.

 

Waid's Daredevil, Fantastic Four and Black Widow are all great reads as well.  

 

Also, while he gets a lot of shit these days, Bendis's run on the Avengers was great as was his Daredevil and of course his long stint writing the Ultimate Spider-Man is also a must read.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, The Eagle Lord said:

Anyone reading anything interesting these days besides The Immortal Hulk? 

 

My current favourite each month is Warren Ellis' Wildstorm reboot, called The Wild Storm oddly enough. Starting with Angie the Engineer going public with her nanosuit to save a guy falling from a skyscraper, it gradually (re)introduces the various Wildstorm players who are mostly the same albeit with the odd race/genderbent spin here and there. The basics are still the same - Bendix runs Skywatch from space, IO handle things on Earth and various independent players are both targetted by them and trying to set them off against each other, all the while Jenny Sparks starts assembling The Authority in the background to tear down the corrupt power structures, and John Lynch goes about following a trail of former associates that will presumably set the stage for Gen13.

 

It's something of a slow burn at first, the stakes gradually escalating each issue as Skywatch and IO plot against each other with varying degrees of horrific lethality while gradually realising other agents/factors at play too.

 

I knew nothing about the WildCATS and Kherubim/Daemon side of things but read Gen13, Stormwatch (oh that cruel ending) and The Authority back in the day so it's been fun getting a lot of gaps filled and seeing a lot of old favourites given a fresh lick of paint - it's a good example of how to do a reboot well. It's more spycraft and tech based than the superheroics of its previous version, though Jenny, Jack, Angie, Apollo and the Midnighter are essentially unchanged and Shen is no longer a weird bird woman but instead doubles up as the current incarnation of The Doctor.

 

There was also a limited series spin-off based around one of IO's hitmen as he's given missions to kill versions of various DC characters (spoiler - naturally, John Constantine is the only one to survive). It was enjoyable enough but suffered from some horrendous art that spoiled things rather.

 

As for as the main series, my only negatives would be the non-appearance of the Planetary gang (though there are a couple of references that fans will recognise), and the fact it's due to end in a couple of months with #24. Hopefully it's just the end of the first act though and a Vol 2 will ensue.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So my must read list now is the rest of Immortal Hulk and Punisher Max. Neither available on Marvel Unlimited in their entirety (or at all).

 

Looks like I'm waiting for the next appropriate Comixology sale.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Joystick Chevron said:

 

My current favourite each month is Warren Ellis' Wildstorm reboot, called The Wild Storm oddly enough. Starting with Angie the Engineer going public with her nanosuit to save a guy falling from a skyscraper, it gradually (re)introduces the various Wildstorm players who are mostly the same albeit with the odd race/genderbent spin here and there. The basics are still the same - Bendix runs Skywatch from space, IO handle things on Earth and various independent players are both targetted by them and trying to set them off against each other, all the while Jenny Sparks starts assembling The Authority in the background to tear down the corrupt power structures, and John Lynch goes about following a trail of former associates that will presumably set the stage for Gen13.

 

 

 

I need to reread this in one go. I tend to lose track. There's also a spinoff series that I can't remember the name of with one of the characters running around murdering shithead versions of DC heroes which is quite fun.

 

In Young Justice news I love this cover. Also can't wait to find out more about Teen Lantern

 

Wv4uykq.jpg

 

Very nice to have Bart back. And Connor next issue apparently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 06/02/2019 at 18:56, Mr. Gerbik said:

@womblingfree I highly recommend Jonathan Hickman's Fantastic Four run, which continues in his subsequent Avengers run, and concludes in his Secret Wars series. 'Epic' has been seldom used as appropriately as when describing this three part run.

 

On 06/02/2019 at 22:07, Charliemouse said:

Hickman's Fantastic Four is amazing and his Avengers run gets a lot of love, but I found it a bit cold and lacking in humour. 

 

Great recommendations! Finished Vision, amazing. Now started on Fantastic Four.

 

Quick question, do you mean Hickman’s run on the Fantastic Four from issue 570, and then the later FF? Started with FF but there was so much going on I needed some serious back story, so have gone back to his stint from 570 onwards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, womblingfree said:

 

 

Great recommendations! Finished Vision, amazing. Now started on Fantastic Four.

 

Quick question, do you mean Hickman’s run on the Fantastic Four from issue 570, and then the later FF? Started with FF but there was so much going on I needed some serious back story, so have gone back to his stint from 570 onwards.

 You are best reading both at the same time, I would also recommend reading Secret Warriors by Hickman as well as with all his stuff, they are tie in with one another and some of the plt lines don't get resolved until his Avengers run and Secret Wars.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@womblingfree it has been a long time, but looking it up you definitely need to start at Fantastic Four 570. That's what I did. The book got renamed to FF at some point, but the overarching storylines simply continue on from before. After reading all of Hickman's Fantastic Four stuff, I moved on to his Avengers stuff. There are websites recommending a bazillion additional comics to fill in every single little detail, but imo those are not remotely necessary - it all stands perfectly on its own iirc.

 

And glad you enjoyed Vision, lovely little series that is. As charming as it is disturbing.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Something else I've been enjoying recently is a Dark Horse adaptation of William Gibson's unused Alien 3 script, part 4/5 of which is out this week. Everyone knows about the old 'wooden planet of monks' that eventually became the slapheads on a prison colony film Fincher directed but before all that, Gibson turned in a treatment which went in a somewhat different direction.

 

Essentially, the story was split between two locations - one space station owned by Weyland-Yutani, and another belonging to a Soviet style alliance of communists engaged in a cold war with them. The space communists pick up the Sulaco in their territory, get a rough idea of what happened and deliver the Sulaco to W-Y. However, they keep Bishop's remains, which they pump for info and retrieve cell samples still on it from the Alien queen, before patching him up and later sending him back too. They then begin running their own experiments on the Alien cells, with completely predictable results.

 

Meanwhile, Hicks and Newt are revived but there's an issue with Ripley's cryotube so she's effectively out of action for the entire story (hmmm, can't imagine why it was rejected...). Obnoxious W-Y reps on the station co-op the station's scientists to experimenting on Alien cell samples too...

 

..also with completely predictable results. Ultimately it's up to Hicks and the rapidly dwindling station staff trying to contain the problem and escape the station before it's too late.

 

The way the Alien cells are used in the screenplay may have influenced Prometheus and, especially, Covenant, and result in a particularly hideous reveal at one point as a character receives a gruesome comeuppance. There's also a nice scene with Bishop proving yet again how much he owns after the W-Y reps put him in charge of the experiments on the Alien cell cultures.

 

I expect the issues will be collected in a few months, I'd certainly recommend it to any Alien fans. It's an interesting curio of what might have been.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's the forums opinion on Deadly Class then? I think Wes Craig's art elevates it so much. 

 

Some of his panels and double page spreads are up there with peak Miller/Janson 

 

Rick Remenders writing is as solid as always and overall its one of Images better titles.  

 

 I know as a huge fan of the original Watchmen and Alan Moores funny books in general, that my purchasing of Before Watchmen Omnibus must be at odds but have I justed wasted money? I can't have with writers like Cooke and Azarello. Can I? 

 

Haven't restarted reading it but my Sixth Gun hardcover arrived last month and I don't know its ever been discussed in this thread but again it's a cracking reading and who doesn't love pulpy horror western tales?

 

Opinions sought. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Loved Deadly Class. Best comic I read last year. Got the whole lot for peanuts in a Humble Bundle, felt kind of guilty but I didn't realise it was going to be so good.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, cassidy said:

 I know as a huge fan of the original Watchmen and Alan Moores funny books in general, that my purchasing of Before Watchmen Omnibus must be at odds but have I justed wasted money? I can't have with writers like Cooke and Azarello. Can I? 

 

 

The Azarello / Rorschach story has its moments, but it feels like he didn't quite get the character. IIRC, there's a bit where Kovacs makes a pass at a woman that just feels utterly wrong given that he's a repressed homosexual who loathes women. Some beautiful art too, but it doesn't quite feel gritty enough for mid-seventies NY. The Darwyn Cooke stories are great though, and probably the only ones that really feel like they add something to the original series. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, cassidy said:

What's the forums opinion on Deadly Class then? I think Wes Craig's art elevates it so much. 

 

Some of his panels and double page spreads are up there with peak Miller/Janson 

 

Rick Remenders writing is as solid as always and overall its one of Images better titles.  

 

 I know as a huge fan of the original Watchmen and Alan Moores funny books in general, that my purchasing of Before Watchmen Omnibus must be at odds but have I justed wasted money? I can't have with writers like Cooke and Azarello. Can I? 

 

Haven't restarted reading it but my Sixth Gun hardcover arrived last month and I don't know its ever been discussed in this thread but again it's a cracking reading and who doesn't love pulpy horror western tales?

 

Opinions sought. 

I am not a huge fan of Deadly Class, Remender has written far better comics.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really like in Deadly Class how he explores teenage alternative sub-cultures through music, clothing, film and gaming. Especially how the message is that ultimately it's a load of old shite that doesn't make you better or happy :D

 

Also, although it's a silly premise for a comic, it really resonated with me the whole 'feeling alone and detached, and trying to fit in' thing of being a teenager.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 21/02/2019 at 20:01, K said:

 

The Darwyn Cooke stories are great though, and probably the only ones that really feel like they add something to the original series. 

So far I'm really rather impressed with it. Minutemen is the highlight as you say but that Ozymandias aint too bad either. Omnibus reading order means I ain't got to Rorschach yet. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.