Jump to content
IGNORED

Do reviews effect sales?


xx404
 Share

Recommended Posts

BG&E.

Framerate problems.

"Cute" characters.

Released in middle of Xmas Rush on just the one format.

Genre hopping, so not astonishingly easy to pigeonhole for marketing.

---

Incidentally, though I preferred it to the gameplay of The Wind Waker - I wouldn't count it in the top ten games I played last year.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wish this kind of patronising view of the massmarket that is often trotted out here was stopped.

I don't mean it to be patronising; it's merely an observation. Games sell on their theme far more than they do on their quality.

I'm guilty of it too, I'm just pointing that out to the people who couldn't understand why something like BG&E was a relative flop.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How about those flashy Driv3r ads which are on MTV and Dutch musicchannels all the time? They make the game look GOOD. Even if it isn't. I think that'll sell a lot of copies to people too lazy/ignorant to read reviews.

In GAME, the intro sequence they had on repeat made it look prettty cool. I'd have bought it if it wasn't for you lot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You obviously played the PS2 version. Xbox did not suffer from such issues.

I thought the game was great, yet it nearly even slipped passed me it was so low-profile.

Yes - but then if you don't get the PS2 version right... you're really not going to sell *that* many copies of a low profile game.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Games sell on their theme far more than they do on their quality.

Agreed. Thinking back to when I bought games for the ZX Spectrum etc., I don't think I bought magazines at the time as the only major print publications available were those containing page after page of program listing -- or at least I hadn't heard of them. So when I went games shopping, the decision was based on the box cover, the game's theme and a large helping of active imagination. All I went home knowing was that "it was a racing game" or "it was an adventure game" and my imagination did the rest. Similarly, with Driver 3, people may go home with thoughts of car chases and tense gun battles. Their imagination does the work. The marketing just needs to do enough to sow the seeds.

When things started to get a "Crash" or "Zzap" sticker on the cover, that was a sure decider, in addition to the magazine review of course. Provided it wasn't just taped off a mate at school that is :unsure:

These days, I value the opinion of trusted forums like rllmuk higher than any magazine review. The Internet means that quite often, the people who write the reviews are able to give a more rounded, informal, opinon by other means. A decent preview backed up with a detailed review close to release date from something like Edge / GamesTM can always be a decider, however.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

IDGI.

So, the reason why mario games sold well is because they're a brand.

how did they sell years ago, before they became a brand then?

I hate to say it, but only one Sprite's right. You can't compare BG&E to Mario, not only because Mario has the greater brand recognition, but also because it gets a much larger marketing spend. Mario really isn't so far away from GTA as you'd like to think in this sense. You can't hold up Mario as a shining example of a game selling on its quality, because there's a hell of a lot more to it than that..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I hate to say it, but only one Sprite's right. You can't compare BG&E to Mario, not only because Mario has the greater brand recognition, but also because it gets a much larger marketing spend. Mario really isn't so far away from GTA as you'd like to think in this sense.

He's not REALLY right, because that as the point I was making. BG&E didn't have a tenth of the marketing spend of any of the really big hits, and was dead before it hit the water.

That doesn't explain why Prince of Persia sold practically piss all though...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That'll teach me to hit "submit" before I finish typing my post.

Anyway, the 2-million figure is liable to have been slightly inflated, what with all the bundle PS2 packs and the discounting and all that.

At any rate, I wouldn't say that the Prince of Persia franchise name even approaches the level of importance attached to the likes of Mario and Driver. The practice of "reinventing" games like this seems a little... odd to me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He's not REALLY right, because that as the point I was making. BG&E didn't have a tenth of the marketing spend of any of the really big hits, and was dead before it hit the water.

That doesn't explain why Prince of Persia sold practically piss all though...

Well I wasnt really making any one specific point there; but I think generally a game will sell on its (a.) theme and (b.) brand recognition.

Prince of Persia is not a particularly well-known brand (it's not like it's been milked to Mario proportions for the last twenty years) nor is it a particularly popular theme with most people ("ooh, look at me, I'm a Prince of the ancient middle east"). However, it did sell a fair few, just not that many for these reasons.

With something like Driv3r or GTA3, there was already a brand which was recent in people's minds (GTA1 was an instant hit wasn't it? Or did it have more of a cult following? Either way, the seeds were set) plus it had the popular theme (fast cars, crime and freedom to 'do damage' - attractive themes to virtually anyone, I'd imagine). This is why they did well; they had both right. Well-established fan base plus popular theme.

Of course the amount of media coverage also comes into this, but if you were to equally 'pimp up' two different games (say, Beyond Good and Evil and Driv3r) with the same amount of advertising and commercials and displays in the shops, there's no way they'd sell the same amount. It's just not what people want.

And I'm sorry if this sounds generalising (bearing in mind I'm only going by what happens generally) but it's just what I see happening, as I'm sure it's what we all see happening.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I wasnt really making any one specific point there; but I think generally a game will sell on its (a.) theme and (b.) brand recognition.

yes, but you seem to be inferring that this brand recognition comes out of nowhere.

Tomb Raider, Driver - at one point they were all unknown quantities, but they at least had some marketing muscle behind them to get people interested in them...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

yes, but you seem to be inferring that this brand recognition comes out of nowhere.

Tomb Raider, Driver - at one point they were all unknown quantities, but they at least had some marketing muscle behind them to get people interested in them...

The success' of Pitfall and Chase HQ would suggest the desire to play those themes has always been around.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Magazine reviews help to determine the number of copies shipped into stores, the shelfspace it's given etc etc, which in turn has a significant affect on sales.

No they don't, factors like pre-orders placed by customers and performance of similar titles previously will influence the buyers decision.

Publishers can buy shelf space and pay for the point of sale material so that the game gets great exposure in store.

I see that Game are selling Driver 3 bundled with a DVD (Gone in 60 seconds, I think) This will increace sales as its an added value bundle.

Reviews only let the end user make a purchasing decision as the orders for the stock are placed well in advance of thew magazines street date.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The answer is: probably nowhere near as much as they used to. Pre-internet they were probably the best source of info. about upcoming games so they obviously had a degree of influence on sales. But nowadays, the immediacy of the WWW plus the well honed marketing machines of the big games publishers mean that hype and bombast drive sales more than a 30-40,000 circulation games magazine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The reason Driv3r has done so well is all down to the 'clever' use of that 3 instead 'e' in a nearly looks the same but the other way round and bigger sort of way  . It says that the game will be stunning to me, don't know about you.

I assume that last sentence was laced with sarcasm ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No they don't, factors like pre-orders placed by customers and performance of similar titles previously will influence the buyers decision....

I said "help to determine".

I was thinking small games with a tiny marketing budget (as the majority of releases are).

I guess you're thinking brand name titles with big marketing budgets.

They're clearly a different proposition.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Again, no they don't.

Shelf space is BOUGHT by publishers, as is coverage on the TV screens in the stores.

It all depends how well the publisher promotes the game to the store, and the back catalogue of games they have (track record for success etc).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's because no-one wants to play a green-lipped chick with a stick and a talking pig with rocket boots, when they could be shootin' and drivin' n' shit, innit?

Very true. It was a hard sell. I didn't get interested until I'd played a playable demo, which is about the time the price dropped by about 50%.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You obviously played the PS2 version. Xbox did not suffer from such issues.

I thought the game was great, yet it nearly even slipped passed me it was so low-profile.

The PS2 version I played didn't suffer that much. I think there's a call for another BG&E thread.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The success' of Pitfall and Chase HQ would suggest the desire to play those themes has always been around.

The original success of Pitfall was that you could control something that actually looked like a person.

Later versions have cashed in on the memories of the original. Witness they almost all have the original Pitfall! hidden in the game somewhere.

(Pitfall 2:the Lost Caverns being the exception.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.