Jump to content
IGNORED

Do reviews effect sales?


xx404
 Share

Recommended Posts

1UP has a news article mentioning that Driv3r has sold 2.5 million copies already. I know there were allegations of reviewers being bribed but if you look at a site such as Metacritic you see that not all reviews were favourable.

For as long as I can remember, the charts have been dominated by crap games so is it even worth bribing reviewers? There are also examples of games that got excellent reviews (e.g. Beyond Good & Evil) but didn't sell nearly as well as they should have. The public seem to want to buy crap regardless of what the reviews say.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think reviews do play quite a part in sales. I used to make all my purchases on the basis of mag reviews but now I judge forums reactions to games and choose what to buy on that basis. Having said that Im quite tempted to pick up Driv3r just to see what all the fuss is about ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Driver 3, thus is shall be known, had the hype to go along with it and fans of Driver 1 and 2 who couldn't wait to buy the next installment which is probably what helped push sales.

What scares me is that there is about 50% of those who have bought the game will be very disappointed - so expect to see the game in second-hand bins very soon.

But no matter what Atari will make a nice bundle of cash out of this just like they did with Enter the Matrix and will keep doing it while people continue to buy the shit they produce.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think reviews do play a part, but of all the gamers out there how many actually buy mags or scan the web? There are a lot of punters who don't know anything about a game they buy - just go along with the 'buzz'.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Or they see the demo in the shop...

Or they get word from their friends...

Or they read the magazine in the shops...

Sure there is a selection of people who will base their gaming purchases on reviews in magazines. To be honest in the old days I did too, but we have progressed onwards now and this forum and the internet gives me a much more balanced view of games then any one magazine - apart from Edge who I find I may not always agree with but they do put forward reasonable arguements for why they have scored a game as such.

Unlike other magazines. Don't get me started on KOTOR in certain mags...it was messy the last time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To me it doesn't matter anymore if the reviews are read by a wide audience or not.

Reviewers need to be accountable to their readership first.

It's the reviewers they trust. (Especially younger readers.)

And, it's the reviewers they are paying to get decent editorial coverage.

If in reality it has to work the current way then why not just do away with reviewers and replace them with marketing people to create magazine style catalogs?

After all, IT OBVIOUSLY WORKED OUT WELL IN THE EARLY 80's!!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The reason Driv3r has done so well is all down to the 'clever' use of that 3 instead 'e' in a nearly looks the same but the other way round and bigger sort of way ;) . It says that the game will be stunning to me, don't know about you.

Tis Driver 3. I will not bow to this evil world of text and elite speak that many gamers and the younger generation fall into.

Down with this horrible form of writing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Plenty of written detail about a game is straight from a PR dept anyway, regardless of what certain magazines say.

I think the ability to download gameplay movies has changed my options for deciding to buy a new game or not and cover mounted demo discs have encouraged me to buy quite a few games I originally had no interest in over the last year or so.

Reviews should help you sort out desirable purchases, not directly form your opinion. For me I treat them like a gentle word in my ear to either confirm an entertaining game, or highlight features that I wont enjoy or critical flaws that will certainly frustrate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You've got to wonder, though, about just how many of those sales have come from people who already have an excellent and well-rounded idea of how bad the game is, but just want to experience it for themselves, and go out of their way to get a copy a soon as possible; those gamers who play just to get an opinion on a game that's more 'event' than video game.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You've got to wonder, though, about just how many of those sales have come from people who already have an excellent and well-rounded idea of how bad the game is, but just want to experience it for themselves, and go out of their way to get a copy a soon as possible; those gamers who play just to get an opinion on a game that's more 'event' than video game.

I'm probably guilty of that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Coverage (including previews and especially covers) in the single format mags can influence sales. The '9/10' stickers serve more to confirm 'yes, this is the game you've been hearing about' as opposed to 'this is a higher quality game than others'.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On the other hand, we all fell for a game (movie/book/CD) at least once after a great review, ending up disappointed with the end result. So I don't think a '9/10' sticker on the box will push people over.

Yes - but we're idiots.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Games like BG&E got lots of previews in the singleformat rags/mags and very good scores. Still didn't sell. I think that in the case of Driv3r, the sky-high marketing budget, ads and presentation helped a lot. All stores have huge Driv3r signs and displays. It's running on demopods. The TV ads look superb. The screenshots on the box look superb. It just oozes sky-high production values all the way. Until you start playing, that is.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's because no-one wants to play a green-lipped chick with a stick and a talking pig with rocket boots, when they could be shootin' and drivin' n' shit, innit?

Well, it won't be to everybody's liking, I'm sure. On the other hand, don't the people who go to see box-office record-breaking movies like Finding Nemo or Monsters Inc. own consoles? Talking fish seem to be quite popular these days.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's no way it's worse than The Getaway. More bugs, yes, but at least it's interesting. ;)

Oh, and that sold well 'cos it's cars and guns, innit? And Laaahhhndan. And fahhhkin' swearing.

Honestly, you could make the shittest game ever about... bank robberies... and it'd sell like a futhermucker!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Magazines don't really influence sales across the board, but for the massively hyped games, both the game and magazine can benefit from a well timed campaign.

In the case of Driv3r, Atari have a big franchise to sell so they start up the hype machine via previews, TV spots, etc. until it becomes a very desirable title. Then fo course we come to release and all the punter wants to know is "Is Driv3r actually any good?"

It now that the magazines benefit from their bought review as their cover story screams out that there's the definitive verdict on this white hot game inside.

So the punter buys the magazine, bolstering sales of the rag and the score and prose within paints Driv3r as a must-have title and thusly the punter knows the game is a safe investment and the game is set for the top of the charts.

It's a vicious circle, but one that serves both the game and magazine publishers very well indeed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's because no-one wants to play a green-lipped chick with a stick and a talking pig with rocket boots, when they could be shootin' and drivin' n' shit, innit?

I wish this kind of patronising view of the massmarket that is often trotted out here was stopped. I think it's woefully misguided and not really looking deeper at some of the issues that cause rubbish games to sell.

I mean, I know it makes you feel smug and above the filthy proles and all that, but you're not so far removed. I mean you yourself have purchased every version of Driver and no doubt thoroughly enjoyed a ton of 'mass market' GTA style games.

Water the flowers in your own backgarden.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wish this kind of patronising view of the massmarket that is often trotted out here was stopped. I think it's woefully misguided and not really looking deeper at some of the issues that cause rubbish games to sell.

I mean, I know it makes you feel smug and above the filthy proles and all that, but you're not so far removed. I mean you yourself have purchased every version of Driver and no doubt thoroughly enjoyed a ton of 'mass market' GTA style games.

Water the flowers in your own backgarden.

hear hear.

Plus, if BG&E had gotten even HALF the amount of marketing spend that driv3r is getting, it probably would hav done a damn sight better.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think game sales are affected much by people reading mag reviews as their readership figures are so small compared to the number of console/pc owners out there.

However, putting "9/10 OXM" on a games cover has a more significant effect. People just looking for a "good" game to play will think its good just because a printed magazine tells them it is. Of course, this applies for all media.

Quite why Atari allegedly paid to have guaranteed 9/10s is beyond me - surely the hype,advertising and game name were enough to guarantee big sales for Driver 3.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.