Jump to content
IGNORED

Edge 138


Mr Do 71
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'll do some web searching tomorrrow for the "good" people Poole references (Jesper Juul, Kurt Squire): if anyone has some links let me know.

I like Biffo too. He's so funny and amiable, like your favourite gaming uncle.

Jesper is at ITU Copenhagen here and has a blog here. Kurt Squire can be found at joystick101 and is part of a project that can be found here. If you fancy looking around for all that is odd and wonderful in the field then try ludology.org for its links to blogs and researchers, game research for its reviews, buzzcut for the intersection between games journalism and academia, or grandtextauto for something more highbrow. There again, you could always try my page to see an example of a humanities academic from the UK. I think I only ever said nice things about Trigger Happy in print.

Biffo's lament for the over emphasis on story, oddly enough, is something that the academics have been banging on about for quite a while now as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for that bzzz. Looks like you'd better keep saying nice things about Trigger Happy or he will destroy you!

An American guy waiting for my train this morning *really* liked the cover this month. "Where did you get your magazine from? That looks awesome. We don't get magazines in the States anything like that. Wow, look at the PSP, look at the screen. It makes me sad, they're going to destroy the Nintendo and Sega of my youth. Gameboy doesn't stand a chance." I of course, said nothing. It's not the done thing to talk at stations. Don't these colonials know anything? I pushed him with my furled umbrella in front of the train.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Because The Lord of the Mecha Genre ruled that all games with big stompy (or even not so stompy) robots in, regardless of play mechanics, were part of one big genre, thus making it perfectly legal to compare any given two of them?

:)

They are parts of one big genre, but there are subsets within that. The two main branches of mecha "action" gaming are Armored Core and Virtual On. Almost everything within the action subset copies either the one or the other (eg - Phantom Crash copies Armored Core and Anubis copies Virtual On).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They are parts of one big genre, but there are subsets within that. The two main branches of mecha "action" gaming are Armored Core and Virtual On. Almost everything within the action subset copies either the one or the other (eg - Phantom Crash copies Armored Core and Anubis copies Virtual On).

So it's unfair to compare them even though they're even in the same sub-genre, just not the same sub-sub-genre (mecha->action->something) . Someone should send out some little laminated charts with all the proper categories on it.

But if it were me, I would have subdivided the proper gameplay genres and given each of them a little mecha sub-genre (if absolutely necessary), rather than basing it on whether the main character was made of metal or not. Would have avoided this whole exasperating mess.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just got Edge and was intrigued to see why the excellent Smash Court Tennis only got 6/10.

I'm a big fan of tennis games and have played all the greats from Super Tennis through to Top Spin, via Virtua Tennis. After a bit of practice this game reveals it to be the best of the bunch so far for lots of reasons I won't bore you with.

Anyway, I trangress, the reason for one of my rare posts ;) is that Edge mark the game down for the career mode :

Quote: "Here's an oddity:a tennis game that rewards success by playing less tennis"

and

Quote : "Career mode plays out automatically calling you in at critical moments....it makes an otherwise solid game feel hollow in the middle"

Fair enough, but there is an bloomin option on the tour menu to switch the Mission mode off and revert to normal tournament play !! :(

I'm very surprised and disapointed at Edge for making such a hugh cock up, considering that the whole review is based around that mode. It would be like reviewing GT3's arcade mode without realising that there was another GT mode !

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is undoubtedly true, but it looked to me that Edge was just talking about the system of upgrades and parts, not the general play.

Indeed, but the customisation aspect of Custom Robo takes very much a back seat to the actual gameplay action (something the review should have talked about more). Whereas in Armored Core there is a far greater emphasis on customisation in relation to how you play the game.

Custom Robo is a Virtual On clone due to the way the mecha move within the game, it's very structured. Armored Core's combat is freeform, it's only the customisation that is structured. There is a distinct, but profound, difference between the two modes of games design for these two games.

So it's unfair to compare them even though they're even in the same sub-genre, just not the same sub-sub-genre (mecha->action->something) . Someone should send out some little laminated charts with all the proper categories on it.

From a reviewing point of view, that covers specific parts of how a game plays, making reference to a game that plays differently to another will misinform the reader. So, yes it's unfair to the reader to compare Custom Robo to Armored Core.

I already explained all this ages ago, so we don't need any laminated charts :(

But if it were me, I would have subdivided the proper gameplay genres and given each of them a little mecha sub-genre (if absolutely necessary), rather than basing it on whether the main character was made of metal or not.  Would have avoided this whole exasperating mess.

This is a problem that isn't just relevant to mecha gaming though, but I do agree nonetheless. Genres should be based upon gameplay, rather than aesthetic considerations (all FPS games are in the same genre for example, which is misleading).

However, in the interim, it is important to categorise gaming genres under the same conventions (otherwise they will be overlooked). My adherence to this is purely down to pre-ordained system some journalistic muppet concocted.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Indeed, but the customisation aspect of Custom Robo takes very much a back seat to the actual gameplay action (something the review should have talked about more).

Stop me if I'm mistaken here, but wasn't it just that specific part of the game that was compared to Armored Core and not the game as a whole? What else would they use to compare the upgradey bits of a game if not a game that is about that very thing?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I already explained all this ages ago, so we don't need any laminated charts

We might not need one, but I want one, goddammit! ;)

My adherence to this is purely down to pre-ordained system some journalistic muppet concocted.

Down with muppets! :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ah, fuck, no, not another Edge and mechie nonsense thread. Please. It's been done to death.

Only once or twice, it's not my fault that the middlecore denizens of rllmuk have a shitfit about it.

Stop me if I'm mistaken here, but wasn't it just that specific part of the game that was compared to Armored Core and not the game as a whole? What else would they use to compare the upgradey bits of a game if not a game that is about that very thing?

Indeed, but it would have been beneficial to explain Custom Robo's customisation in the context of itself rather than make a very general allusion to Armored Core. In doing so, it misleads the reader into thinking that the games have more in common than they actually do. The reason for delineating is because Custom Robo is much more akin to Virtual On in terms of gameplay, so a reference to Armored Core merely muddies the analytical water.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Indeed, but it would have been beneficial to explain Custom Robo's customisation in the context of itself rather than make a very general allusion to Armored Core. In doing so, it misleads the reader into thinking that the games have more in common than they actually do. The reason for delineating is because Custom Robo is much more akin to Virtual On in terms of gameplay, so a reference to Armored Core merely muddies the analytical water.

Ah, groovy. I never read it, see.

Also, stop saying middlecore.

Ta.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Middlecore" is surely just a normal gamer isn't it? They know their hobby well but don't get obessive about it. The world would be a better place if people were less fanatical about things, more "middlecore" if you will.

Middlecore:

1. Gamers who play the same obscure games as everyone else.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What's a heavy gamer? What's a hardcore gamer? What's a casual gamer?

Come on, it's basic grammar. You don't know what casual is? Or hardcore? Or heavy use? I see what you're trying to do but there are clear distinctions between someone like Cacophanus and my girlfriend with regards to gaming.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Contradictory, really, seeing that if everyone plays a game, it isn't obscure by definition.

Try again.

(Or was that a joke? :( )

At the risk of contradicting Cacky and Sprites in the same thread (and a scores thread at that) you're wrong. The definition makes sense if we have a small gang on here where we tend to be interested in the same games, even if they are obscure to the world as a whole. Frequency, Ico, Rez. Our cunning plan to get on Kerraig's good side by pretending we like Metal Arms, that sort of thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.