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Lost - The Full Series Thread


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Interesting...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philadelphia_Experiment

The Philadelphia Experiment allegedly was a secret experiment conducted by the U.S. Navy at the Philadelphia Naval Yards at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on or before October 28, 1943, which went horribly awry.

The experiment was allegedly conducted by one Dr. Franklin Reno (or Rinehart) as a military application of Albert Einstein's unified field theory, or "generalized theory of gravitation". The theory, briefly, postulates the interrelatedness of the forces that comprise electromagnetic radiation and gravity. Through a special application of the theory, it was thought to be possible, with specialized equipment and enough energy, to bend light around an object, rendering it essentially invisible. The Navy considered this application to be of obvious value in wartime (as the United States was engaged in World War II at the time) and approved and sponsored the experiment. A Navy destroyer escort, USS Eldridge (DE-173), was fitted with the required generator equipment at the Naval Yards in Philadelphia.

Testing began in the summer of 1943, and was initially successful to a limited degree. One test, on July 22, 1943, resulted in Eldridge being rendered almost completely invisible, with some eyewitnesses reporting a "greenish fog" — however, crew members complained of serious nausea afterwards. At that point, the experiment was altered by the request of the Navy, with the new goal being invisible to radar only.

Equipment was not recalibrated, and the experiment was performed again on October 28. This time, Eldridge not only actually became almost entirely invisible to the naked eye, but actually vanished from the area entirely in a flash of blue light. Concurrent with this phenomenon, the U.S. Naval base at Norfolk, Virginia, just over 600 km (375 miles) away, reported sighting Eldridge offshore for several minutes, whereupon Eldridge vanished again and reappeared in Philadelphia, at the site it had originally occupied — a supposed case of accidental teleportation.

The physiological effects on the crew were profound. Almost all of the crew were violently ill. Some suffered from mental illness because of the experience — behavior conforming to schizophrenia is described in some accounts. Still other members were missing — supposedly "vanished" — and allegedly five of the crew were actually fused to the metal bulkhead or deck of the ship. Horrified, Navy officials immediately cancelled the experiment. All of the surviving crew involved were discharged; in some accounts, brainwashing was used to make some crew members forget about the details of their experience.

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That's been name checked for a good while now, Soong, as a potential theory/idea. I remember reading some big thread on The Fuselage last year during season downtime that went into it in some detail.

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Interesting...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philadelphia_Experiment

The Philadelphia Experiment allegedly was a secret experiment conducted by the U.S. Navy at the Philadelphia Naval Yards at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on or before October 28, 1943, which went horribly awry.

The experiment was allegedly conducted by one Dr. Franklin Reno (or Rinehart) as a military application of Albert Einstein's unified field theory, or "generalized theory of gravitation". The theory, briefly, postulates the interrelatedness of the forces that comprise electromagnetic radiation and gravity. Through a special application of the theory, it was thought to be possible, with specialized equipment and enough energy, to bend light around an object, rendering it essentially invisible. The Navy considered this application to be of obvious value in wartime (as the United States was engaged in World War II at the time) and approved and sponsored the experiment. A Navy destroyer escort, USS Eldridge (DE-173), was fitted with the required generator equipment at the Naval Yards in Philadelphia.

Testing began in the summer of 1943, and was initially successful to a limited degree. One test, on July 22, 1943, resulted in Eldridge being rendered almost completely invisible, with some eyewitnesses reporting a "greenish fog" — however, crew members complained of serious nausea afterwards. At that point, the experiment was altered by the request of the Navy, with the new goal being invisible to radar only.

Equipment was not recalibrated, and the experiment was performed again on October 28. This time, Eldridge not only actually became almost entirely invisible to the naked eye, but actually vanished from the area entirely in a flash of blue light. Concurrent with this phenomenon, the U.S. Naval base at Norfolk, Virginia, just over 600 km (375 miles) away, reported sighting Eldridge offshore for several minutes, whereupon Eldridge vanished again and reappeared in Philadelphia, at the site it had originally occupied — a supposed case of accidental teleportation.

The physiological effects on the crew were profound. Almost all of the crew were violently ill. Some suffered from mental illness because of the experience — behavior conforming to schizophrenia is described in some accounts. Still other members were missing — supposedly "vanished" — and allegedly five of the crew were actually fused to the metal bulkhead or deck of the ship. Horrified, Navy officials immediately cancelled the experiment. All of the surviving crew involved were discharged; in some accounts, brainwashing was used to make some crew members forget about the details of their experience.

This is a fake. Yes?

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You've never heard of the Philidelphia experiment RXander? It's pretty damn famous as one of the proper classic conspiracy theories.

Comrade:

I kinda had the same idea as your theory, but a bit different. What if the giant electromagnet was making a big field around the island, which messed about with navigation equipment. Now that Soong has mentioned the Philidelphia experiment, another piece has kinda fallen in - what if this field had rendered the island invisible to the outside world. Now that the magnet has gone proper wrong, perhaps the field has been broken and the island is visible. Perhaps the reason Henry wasn't too unhappy with this is because Walt has provided them with whatever they were looking for

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So, I thought it was pretty good. I would have preferred a bit more in the way of revelations, not all of it, but a bit more. I mean, we still don't really know what happens when the button isn't pressed. The light and everything was quite impressive, but what did it mean? We still don't totally know why the plane crashed - that Des failed to press the button is only an unproved theory (an even then, an incomplete one), and works against the idea that it all happened on purpose.

Anyway, apart from that, I enjoyed it. My theory: the island is encased in a giant dome, Truman Show-stylee, plonked in the arctic (or antarctic, whichever one the caravan at the end is in). This is why Des couldn't find anything when he sailed away - he was being secretly led in a circle around the island. The plane crash was all staged as well. The dome is hidden in someway, underground probably, and the caravan blokes are trying to look for it.

Right, it's gone 8 so I'mma post without spoiler tags...

No, we do know what happens when the button isn't pressed - it's all in relation to massive amounts of naturally occuring electromagnetic activity that, because of an incident, is under the control of the bunker's system. Pressing the button releases built up energy... somehow. It's all a bit vague, but that's the general idea.

As for the plane crashing - I'm sure Desmond caused it. The show isn't so much about events being determined by man, but by fate. If you believe in fate that is.

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Right, it's gone 8 so I'mma post without spoiler tags...

No, we do know what happens when the button isn't pressed - it's all in relation to massive amounts of naturally occuring electromagnetic activity that, because of an incident, is under the control of the bunker's system. Pressing the button releases built up energy... somehow. It's all a bit vague, but that's the general idea.

Not that vague. You've probably done it hundreds of times, albeit without entering a long code number.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Degauss

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Locke can't have died. He's brilliant.

And what of the numbers? The same numbers that Hurley used to win the lottery and which were being entered into the computer. Locke seemed to only damage the computer enough for it not to be used to enter the numbers on that particular occassion. Which is a bit of luck.....

I think the only reason that Charlie didn't go back for them was so that we could be left wondering what had happened to them.

Great finale. It's a very slow show but superb when we finally find stuff out.

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No, we do know what happens when the button isn't pressed - it's all in relation to massive amounts of naturally occuring electromagnetic activity that, because of an incident, is under the control of the bunker's system. Pressing the button releases built up energy... somehow. It's all a bit vague, but that's the general idea.

Do you think there's a difference between the magnet power building up, and someone turning the key in that hole?

Because Desmond got back late to the computer, and the magnet was causing all the damage, but he still put the number in eventually, shutting it down. By then the damage was already done of course. So we never saw what would happen if it kept going. Is the release of pressure, using the key, not the same as the magnet going off/exploding? It's still a bit vague :lol:

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So, I thought it was pretty good. I would have preferred a bit more in the way of revelations, not all of it, but a bit more. I mean, we still don't really know what happens when the button isn't pressed. The light and everything was quite impressive, but what did it mean? We still don't totally know why the plane crashed - that Des failed to press the button is only an unproved theory (an even then, an incomplete one), and works against the idea that it all happened on purpose.

Anyway, apart from that, I enjoyed it. My theory: the island is encased in a giant dome, Truman Show-stylee, plonked in the arctic (or antarctic, whichever one the caravan at the end is in). This is why Des couldn't find anything when he sailed away - he was being secretly led in a circle around the island. The plane crash was all staged as well. The dome is hidden in someway, underground probably, and the caravan blokes are trying to look for it.

How could the plain crash be staged if Lost shows the plain beign ripped apart and bits landing on the island/ocean?

In my earlier post - I wasn't obviously expecting the finale to explain everything - I was just stating how there's still so many loose ends, and I would have preferred some things to be tied up and explained, leading us to more questions. Rather than just offloading even more questions on to us and leaving everythign else to be a tangled mess.

And from Hurley's comic book that Walt was reading:

107406822_5e33eb76f0.jpg

Fits the snowglobe quote and the arctic conditions from the end of ep 24!

On another note, if the plane really was brought down by accident then how do the Others know so much about the 'Lostaways', and why were they so hostile towards them from the beginning?

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Do you think there's a difference between the magnet power building up, and someone turning the key in that hole?

Because Desmond got back late to the computer, and the magnet was causing all the damage, but he still put the number in eventually, shutting it down. By then the damage was already done of course. So we never saw what would happen if it kept going. Is the release of pressure, using the key, not the same as the magnet going off/exploding? It's still a bit vague :lol:

Yea actually - in retrospect, how can it be a naturally occuring energy buildup if there's a 'failsafe' that purges it completely? Why would you want to keep pressing the button if you could stop it all together? Unless the failsafe destroys something which Dharma wanted to keep as part of their experiment...

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I don't get this whole button thing. If it was really that important, why have some ridiculouly elaborate system of computers and inputting numbers. When all it needed was an auto reset system in place to save a catastrophy.

The experiment of seeing whether people would push the button didn't need to be tied to something that really could fuck up for real. hmmm

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A brilliant ending how can people say its a shit ending, if anything the ending shows that they found the island. My god the ending was fucking amazing. It gave a lot of answers but it did give a lot of questions.

Also I don't think Eko and Locke are dead I think it was an explosion making all metalic things pushed outwards, that's why the hatch door landed. The fucking foot with four toes was amazing and will be a major factor in the coming seasons.

We didn't see the black smoke monster which the promo suggested we would see but doesn't matter. Hopefully we'll see the story of the others next season.

We found out why the plane crashed so thats a big answer revealed, so how people can say nothing was answered I don't know and it really annoys me when people say that, I cannot wait for season 3 I'm sure the show will change a lot.

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Holy shit Bill, the full stop is your friend - USE YOUR FRIEND.

As regards the foot... I'm not even going to speculate.

However lest we forget there's still the black smoke monster, the animals (including at least one shark), Walt's crazy powers and the numbers to explain... which still don't seem to have much bearing on Dharma/Hanso as yet.

And that's not including other smaller unexplained things... like the bodies at the caves or the island's mysterious healing properties.

Gah! fucking Lost.

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When the statue's foot appeared, I assumed it was a red herring, and just a nod to Planet of the Apes, but the opposite (that showed the top of a statue, this showed the bottom).

By why only four toes?

Found this picture of Caesar from Planet of the Apes, which shows four toes at the front (there's a toe on the side of each foot too, but you can't see it due to the plaque).

2801.jpg

Straw clutching. I know.

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I didn't quite get this bit (number 352 in a series of infinity):

When Locke and Deso meet on the beach they share the snowman joke, and we see later that Kelvin tells it to Deso when he arrives in the hatch. Is there some obvious meaning behind this? Has it been used in previous eps?

I haven't gone back and checked this but if I'm remembering correctly, it's a pretty big thing.

I think that the answer to the question is with Walt. It was a joke on the card that Michael sent him for his birthday but he only got to read it on the island....I think...because all the letters Michael had sent to him over the years had been kept in that box by his Mom.

Of course, this means Michael knows the answer too but it could be that Walt and his 'powers' are still somehow crucial to the overall plot.

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I haven't gone back and checked this but if I'm remembering correctly, it's a pretty big thing.

I think that the answer to the question is with Walt. It was a joke on the card that Michael sent him for his birthday but he only got to read it on the island....I think...because all the letters Michael had sent to him over the years had been kept in that box by his Mom.

Of course, this means Michael knows the answer too but it could be that Walt and his 'powers' are still somehow crucial to the overall plot.

The other replies satisfied my puzzlement, you've just gone and confused me some more :D

I think it's time to go through both series from the start again, with wikipedia close at hand so I can check things out for myself. See if it helps.

It probably won't. :(

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When the statue's foot appeared, I assumed it was a red herring, and just a nod to Planet of the Apes, but the opposite (that showed the top of a statue, this showed the bottom).

By why only four toes?

Found this picture of Caesar from Planet of the Apes, which shows four toes at the front (there's a toe on the side of each foot too, but you can't see it due to the plaque).

Straw clutching. I know.

I think my theory I posted a few pages back is more plausable:

From Headlong Hall by Thomas Love Peacock

Book Description

"The place is quite a wilderness," said Squire Headlong: "for, during the latter part of my father's life, while I was finishing my education, he troubled himself about nothing but the cellar, and suffered everything else to go to rack and ruin. A mere wilderness, as you see, even now in December; but in summer a complete nursery of briers, a forest of thistles, a plantation of nettles, without any livestock but goats, that have eaten up all the bark of the trees. Here you see is the pedestal of a statue, with only half a leg and four toes remaining: there were many here once.

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Just listened to the latest official Lost podcast

The executive producer [Damon Lindel & Carlton Cuse] stated:

season three wil start in September - run for 6 episodes,

then have 12 weeks break, then come back in February, with 17 straight episodes.

also in the back stories we will find out:

How Lock got in the wheelchair

How Jack got his tattoes

All about Kates marriage

They also reckon that we saw the "monster" this season but would not of realised it, all will be explained next season.

Plus it wasn't Matthew Fox in the end scene speaking portuguese

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I wasn't too keen to see we're getting more character development and less mythology next season.

That splitting the season up is a pretty ballsy move!

It'll prolly mean two big cliff hanger endings though. Treat it as two smaller series, it might feel better looking at it like that.

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