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Buying a new TV old games and general thoughts


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I'm thinking of buying a new 4k. Half of me is thinking f##k it and buying a nice oled TV, but that will cost a grand.

 

Couple of things, has anyone here tried an ossc with a 4k ? I'm not even sure if my early model ossc can go up to 4k.

 

Also, input lag. As far as I can tell the best I'll get is about 10ms.

 

My other option is sumsungs much cheaper crystal uhd displays or one of their qleds (not same as oled!) (350 to bout 600 quid ish). Anyone had experience of these?

 

I'd there anything else I should be considering here? I don't feel great about spending so much on a TV but i rarely upgrade hardware round my house like this and I'll use it for ten years or so at least.

I'm also thinking maybe my 2012 32 inch LCD is fine.

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Well firstly, I don't know much about using OSSC and I've never really used OLED/LCD with retro games apart from emulators.

But, what I do know is that with modern TVs you compromise on things like refresh rate and response time, if you go for lower end models in the £300-£600 range. They are usually fine for watching videos on (though you lose the colour definition and picture sharpness you get with £1000+ models like OLEDs or high end LCDs). But not ideal as a main gaming screen. 

 

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^ what tv did you go for?

 

just wanted to say, although i can't disagree if you spend more you can probably get better, i think "lower end models in the £300-£600 range" can be perfectly good for gaming. like you guys say, mainly need to check the input lag, annoying they never have it in the specs.

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If you have some budget it's worth investing in a TV with good built in upscaling - I was all in on OSSC and Mclassic type stuff but then upgraded to a FY2021 Sony Oled - the TV means the mclassic is in the sell pile (and the OSSC got replaced with the Retrotink 5x which is awesome), and I now let the TV do most of the work when it comes to feeding it a signal.  PS3 looks amazing at 720p upscaled by the TV, same with the Wii at 480p (I'd previously been using the Mclassic in that chain - but wasn't particularly happy with it). Older consoles have super crisp pixels and the low latency and lack of any kind of blur is far better than on my previous 2017 sony lcd. So, if you're keeping it for 10 years check out the new 42" oleds perhaps.

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On 06/11/2022 at 15:06, spatular said:

^ what tv did you go for?

 

just wanted to say, although i can't disagree if you spend more you can probably get better, i think "lower end models in the £300-£600 range" can be perfectly good for gaming. like you guys say, mainly need to check the input lag, annoying they never have it in the specs.

Went for a 55inch Samsung quantum dot oled. Totally ridiculous purchase!

Supposedly has very low input lag.

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On 07/11/2022 at 03:49, New York Mikey said:

If you have some budget it's worth investing in a TV with good built in upscaling - I was all in on OSSC and Mclassic type stuff but then upgraded to a FY2021 Sony Oled - the TV means the mclassic is in the sell pile (and the OSSC got replaced with the Retrotink 5x which is awesome), and I now let the TV do most of the work when it comes to feeding it a signal.  PS3 looks amazing at 720p upscaled by the TV, same with the Wii at 480p (I'd previously been using the Mclassic in that chain - but wasn't particularly happy with it). Older consoles have super crisp pixels and the low latency and lack of any kind of blur is far better than on my previous 2017 sony lcd. So, if you're keeping it for 10 years check out the new 42" oleds perhaps.

Oddly it won't display anything with ossc at 5x, have to use 3x so 720p. It looks good, at first I thought it looked terrible due to me setting it to 2x.

 

Not sure how much lag scaling adds. Seems to be fine.

 

Is the retro tink 5x better than an ossc?

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For anyone happy with 32" I'd go for a high-Hz monitor with strobing, since they're a lot cheaper than TVs and potentially have superior input lag and motion at higher framerates. That said, OLED's great tech for strobing (black-frame insertion) because of its response times, likewise DLP projectors in frame-sequential 3D mode, with the caveat they currently need 120fps content. BFI at 60Hz is really flickery, and 60fps at 120Hz returns double images that look as bad or worse than non-strobed motion blur.

 

So for 60fps games with current 1:0 hardware implementations of BFI, the choice between flicker and double images is understandably unpopular. (See Adjustable Motion Blur in the link for a better implementation.)

 

You need a powerful PC to take advantage of it in its best light at 120fps+. BFI60 also increases input lag about twice as much as it needs to on the CX. Equal parts boon and curse for retro games. The CX has better BFI than the C1, though, and I think the C2 might be worse again. I guess because few people used it they removed 60Hz support and prioritised brightness at 120. Anyway, the CX is still the best OLED for motion if you can tolerate 60Hz flicker.

 

Some of us have been crying out for driver-level adjustable BFI for years (flicker's a lot less noticeable at 90Hz and 90fps a more reasonable target), but if you're running RetroArch you might be in luck at some point: https://github.com/libretro/RetroArch/issues/10754

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6 hours ago, Escape said:

For anyone happy with 32" I'd go for a high-Hz monitor with strobing, since they're a lot cheaper than TVs and potentially have superior input lag and motion at higher framerates. That said, OLED's great tech for strobing (black-frame insertion) because of its response times, likewise DLP projectors in frame-sequential 3D mode, with the caveat they currently need 120fps content. BFI at 60Hz is really flickery, and 60fps at 120Hz returns double images that look as bad or worse than non-strobed motion blur.

 

So for 60fps games with current 1:0 hardware implementations of BFI, the choice between flicker and double images is understandably unpopular. (See Adjustable Motion Blur in the link for a better implementation.)

 

You need a powerful PC to take advantage of it in its best light at 120fps+. BFI60 also increases input lag about twice as much as it needs to on the CX. Equal parts boon and curse for retro games. The CX has better BFI than the C1, though, and I think the C2 might be worse again. I guess because few people used it they removed 60Hz support and prioritised brightness at 120. Anyway, the CX is still the best OLED for motion if you can tolerate 60Hz flicker.

 

Some of us have been crying out for driver-level adjustable BFI for years (flicker's a lot less noticeable at 90Hz and 90fps a more reasonable target), but if you're running RetroArch you might be in luck at some point: https://github.com/libretro/RetroArch/issues/10754

Part of the reason I cancelled a lg c2 was input lag issues. That and I'd ordered a 48 inch one which turns out to be way darker than a 55. Seems to be a different build.

 

Is bfi an option in retro arch?

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So my trusty Toshiba LCD stopped working, which was brilliant for retro systems…

 

What small TVs would people recommend to connect SCART based computers or consoles? I’m thinking of the 24 inch or so in size, but looking online it seems that the smallest decent tv you can get now are 32 inch and above. 
 

If a SCART connector in the tv isn’t an option, how do people find connecting a c64 or spectrum to a SCART to hdmi converter and using them with a modern tv, are they any good?

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3 minutes ago, gone fishin said:

So my trusty Toshiba LCD stopped working, which was brilliant for retro systems…

 

What small TVs would people recommend to connect SCART based computers or consoles? I’m thinking of the 24 inch or so in size, but looking online it seems that the smallest decent tv you can get now are 32 inch and above. 
 

If a SCART connector in the tv isn’t an option, how do people find connecting a c64 or spectrum to a SCART to hdmi converter and using them with a modern tv, are they any good?


There are still some cheap 24” TVs available that have a scart socket. We got one for our motorhome (one of the generic supermarket brands I’m sorry I can’t remember which one). The only consoles I’ve used with it are the NES and SNES minis which are obviously HDMI, but I’d expect an RGB Scart signal to be reasonable. 
 

Stay away from cheap Scart to HDMI converters, they add lag and look like arse. Spend a bit more and get an OSSC or something similar.

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