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Nibel quits Twitter


Sarlaccfood
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Quite an interesting account, he was legit up there as a main news source with IGN, Eurgamer etc. 

 

Pretty impressive for (what seems to be) a one person operation. But seems like he couldn’t make it work:

 

(I realise this is only interesting to people that care about media etc. so feel free to move on if you’ve never heard of him dad)

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Sooooo he gave his Patreon a whole month before deciding to shut it down. OK. I don't think that reflects very well on him, to be honest - the number of creators who are successful straight out of the gate are tiny. It strikes me that he thought he could be successful without having to do the hard yards... and then couldn't be bothered to do those yards once he realised how much work he had ahead. He already had a 'name' for himself within the industry, though, which is such a large part of the battle, so he's displaying a bit of a rubbish attitude to be honest.

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AFAIK the Patreon didn’t offer much (or anything) extra. If you’re already an established name then you’re relying a lot on the first few days of starting a Patreon to get some momentum.

 

Good on him for realising it wasn’t worth the time. For a lot of people he was convenient but ultimately not essential. A bit like Twitter itself. 

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I knew his name and av. on twitter but never actually realised he was an actual journalist/source any more than someone who posts a lot of threads on a forum is. Pretty hard sell to make a living from just tweeting news that can be got elsewhere, I'd assume.

 

Twitter is a strange microsociety in a lot of ways.

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18 hours ago, Eighthours said:

Sooooo he gave his Patreon a whole month before deciding to shut it down. OK. I don't think that reflects very well on him, to be honest - the number of creators who are successful straight out of the gate are tiny. It strikes me that he thought he could be successful without having to do the hard yards... and then couldn't be bothered to do those yards once he realised how much work he had ahead. He already had a 'name' for himself within the industry, though, which is such a large part of the battle, so he's displaying a bit of a rubbish attitude to be honest.

 

sounds like he's been doing it for years though. The 'hard yards' he did for free for ages with great popularity, decided to do a Patreon to make a living out of it and learned the hard lesson that people are happy to consume for free, not so happy when money is involved.

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8 minutes ago, SozzlyJoe said:

 

sounds like he's been doing it for years though. The 'hard yards' he did for free for ages with great popularity, decided to do a Patreon to make a living out of it and learned the hard lesson that people are happy to consume for free, not so happy when money is involved.

 

Nail on the head there, imo. Once that pandoras box was opened etc etc.

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also it seems the big websites were depending on him for news and profiting off it.

 

It must have been galling for him to discover that the stuff he posted wasn't worth people paying him for but was worthy of being taken by other big websites to feed their content machine.

 

Not surprised he quit!

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4 hours ago, Clipper said:

also it seems the big websites were depending on him for news and profiting off it.

 

It must have been galling for him to discover that the stuff he posted wasn't worth people paying him for but was worthy of being taken by other big websites to feed their content machine.

 

Not surprised he quit!

But isn't that the problem? Those other sites may have used his stuff, but that was part of a lot of other stuff they would have, whereas he just had his stuff. There's no value-add there, other than convenience I guess, but how many people value that over a Google search is seemingly: not many. 

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34 minutes ago, Gabe said:

But isn't that the problem? Those other sites may have used his stuff, but that was part of a lot of other stuff they would have, whereas he just had his stuff. There's no value-add there, other than convenience I guess, but how many people value that over a Google search is seemingly: not many. 


Not really.

The problem is that the people really benefiting from his service weren’t willing to (or aware they should, or able to afford to) pay for it.

 

and he was perhaps confusing his target market who might be willing to pay (news sites) with the general public.

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4 hours ago, Clipper said:

also it seems the big websites were depending on him for news and profiting off it.

 

It must have been galling for him to discover that the stuff he posted wasn't worth people paying him for but was worthy of being taken by other big websites to feed their content machine.

 

Not surprised he quit!

 

Were websites taking his stuff?

 

From what I saw of the account it was more likely to be the other way around where he'd do a bullet point summary of an article and then link to it. 

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11 minutes ago, footle said:


Not really.

The problem is that the people really benefiting from his service weren’t willing to (or aware they should, or able to afford to) pay for it.

 

and he was perhaps confusing his target market who might be willing to pay (news sites) with the general public.

How is that much different from what I said? People weren't en-masse willing to pay for whatever service he provided (for whatever reason), and he didn't have anything else to encourage them to. He basically read the room wrong. 

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8 minutes ago, bear said:

From what I saw of the account it was more likely to be the other way around where he'd do a bullet point summary of an article and then link to it. 

 

I always thought his tweets were kind of like a filter. You could go and find out information from developer websites and publishers' social media accounts and other websites' reports yourself... or you could wait for the same information to be shared by Nibel. Of course, it works both ways so you'd get people sourcing information from his tweets.

 

Not to downplay his work but I feel like his absence would result in a massive inconvenience rather than a mortal blow for social media.

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I didn't read his blog, but I suspect you have to provide a bit more than just news & scoops if you're running a Patreon / Substack / whatever. There are quite a few people who seem to make some kind of living through newsletters, but people read them for the analysis rather than the raw information.

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9 hours ago, Gabe said:

How is that much different from what I said? People weren't en-masse willing to pay for whatever service he provided (for whatever reason), and he didn't have anything else to encourage them to. He basically read the room wrong. 


the question is whether they’d have been willing if they knew he was going to stop, as opposed to just assuming it would continue to be free.

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33 minutes ago, Transient Curse said:

I'm not familiar with his work but it surprises me he couldn't monetise having (just checked) half a million followers who must surely be easily categorised as being interested in a very specific set of products. 

 

A lot of people online confuse farming clout for offering a service. Of course people are gonna follow someone who does all the legwork for them, everyone is lazy as fuck. But the thing is they know it and once it's presented as a kind of service or job then the value plummets cos the reality is you're just letting someone else find the links for you.

 

If they were genuinely expecting their efforts to turn into anything other than farming followers then they're a fucking idiot. They should've just pivoted to streams and video content like every fucker with 5 figure followers up.

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34 minutes ago, SMD said:

A lot of people online confuse farming clout for offering a service

Well, I hadn't, my point was that he had an audience, and if he'd wanted to use that, turning to them and saying "would you like to pay for my tweets?" Isn't the only way to have gone about it.  I'm surprised by some of the things people support on Patreon, etc. But I'm not surprised someone doing (as I understand it) impersonal online news reporting in Twitter that nobody ever pays for failed to turn it into a business. 

 

However, it's a bit of a classic that the account's passing is being mourned by people who apparently did value what he did - but didn't consider paying for it. I wonder if he'd come back if people said they would pay? I wonder if anyone's even suggested it.

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11 minutes ago, Transient Curse said:

Well, I hadn't, my point was that he had an audience, and if he'd wanted to use that, turning to them and saying "would you like to pay for my tweets?" Isn't the only way to have gone about it.  I'm surprised by some of the things people support on Patreon, etc. But I'm not surprised someone doing (as I understand it) impersonal online news reporting in Twitter that nobody ever pays for failed to turn it into a business. 

 

However, it's a bit of a classic that the account's passing is being mourned by people who apparently did value what he did - but didn't consider paying for it. I wonder if he'd come back if people said they would pay? I wonder if anyone's even suggested it.

 

No I mean he had, most of these aggregator accounts make their money from the engagement, not the content itself.

 

Well, "content".

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