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Coming up, last time, after the break... wtf?


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I rarely watch broadcast live tv these days but I do like the motorbike show which I watch on the catchup ITVHub and my wife watches Grand Designs etc.

 

Why does live tv still do a summary of what we saw 5 mins ago? At beginning of the show they show clips of what's to come in programme (fair enough), then before ad break they say coming up after the break, then after the ad break they summarise what we have seen upto now and then say coming up in this part AGAIN.. etc It is a 1hr programme inc adverts meaning 45 mins and then maybe only 35 mins of that is actual content with 10 mins of repeats.

 

So in the age of Netflix and Prime and DIsney+ etc where we watch an hr of tv content easily without constant reminders and we watch the next episode and get no reminders why does live broadcast tv continue to insist that the viewers are dim and incapable of remembering what just happened? It seems like a strange anachronism to me, are there just production companies still working to an outdated formula?

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9 minutes ago, Uncle Mike said:

It's not that viewers are dim and incapable of remembering, it's that they can't assume you're not channel hopping. So "coming up" is to try and stop you tuning away, and "before the break" is in case you've just joined. It's not complicated.

not watching much live tv I hadn't considered channel hopping. BAck in the mists of time (15 yrs ago maybe) when I watched more live tv there wasn't much point in channel hopping as lots of channels tended to have ads at same time so you are just hopping between ads. Also this hideous way of editing programmes only applies to this sort of "factual" content, they don't do it with comedy or drama or soaps. The factual stuff really doesn't need it either. Telling me after the break what happened before the break is stupid as if I channel hopped all you are telling me is what I've missed and can't watch!

 

It is also a shame because it really damages the watchability of the programme as the constant nagging clips break the flow making it a chore to watch at times. I think the catchup services (like ITVHub) need to rethink how they package the programmes. I am assuming that when they come to sell the programme (on Prime or whatever) that they repackage it without all the guff? maybe not.

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When I was last in the US for any length of time, they had a particularly annoying broadcast trend.

 

One show would finish, and they'd go straight into the next without ads to try and get you hooked in. Then you'd get an ad break one or two minutes in.

 

There's probably psychological data to prove that it worked on scheduled TV, but thank god we don't live in those dark time anymore.

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12 minutes ago, schmojo said:

When I was last in the US for any length of time, they had a particularly annoying broadcast trend.

 

One show would finish, and they'd go straight into the next without ads to try and get you hooked in. Then you'd get an ad break one or two minutes in.

 

There's probably psychological data to prove that it worked on scheduled TV, but thank god we don't live in those dark time anymore.


That’s part of the vernacular of US TV writing: the “teaser”, a couple of minutes long, to attract the viewer, is tacked on to the previous show then you go to commercial and the episode proper starts with the opening credits. We all take that narrative structure for granted even though the episode isn’t broadcast that way here.

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My parents watch some of those road cops and airport border control shows. They seem to have about 3 or 4 stories on the go in each episode, changing between them just as something is about to happen or be revealed. The manipulation is just so barefaced. Then when they return to each storyline, there may be a mini recap of what happened so far.

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I won't be drawn on why I like it so much, but I watch a lot of Masterchef Australia and that is an absolute swine for repeating what you just saw and previewing what's coming up next. In reality you are watching Tease > Tease > Incident > Review. I've noticed this is no way reduces the amount of times someone in your living room will ask what's going on or what they missed though.

 

I do often wonder when on gameshows they do the old 'we'll tell you the answer after the break' gimmick and the contestant looks looks crestfallen whether they actually keep them hanging for a few minutes. Presumably on these pre-records they're trying to rattle through as many episodes as they can in a day and don't actually stop?

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8 hours ago, Art Vandelay said:

I won't be drawn on why I like it so much, but I watch a lot of Masterchef Australia and that is an absolute swine for repeating what you just saw and previewing what's coming up next. In reality you are watching Tease > Tease > Incident > Review. I've noticed this is no way reduces the amount of times someone in your living room will ask what's going on or what they missed though.

There's nothing at all wrong with Masterchef Australia - it's the best of all the Masterchef editions worldwide (by some distance!) But it is awful for repeating content throughout each episode, yeah.

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