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Japanese Super Famicom


kittygotwet
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Yeah, a UK Megadrive 1 power adaptor will power a Super Famicom just fine.

 

In fact when I first got a Super Famicom I just used a UK SNES power supply and had loads of problems with it. Eventually it just stopped working. I bought another Super Famicom off eBay and it had the exact same issue... until I tried a UK Megadrive power supply. It worked a treat being powered by that. Then I tried it with the "broken" Super Famicom and that worked a treat too. So I now have two working Super Famicoms.

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Indeed. The Super Famicom uses a regular dc power adapter at 9v (don’t remember the polarity off hand but same as a megadrive1. The uk PAL snes for reasons uses a 10V Ac power supply since that is what the UK nes used. 
 

There is a rectifier circuit inside a pal snes to convert from ac to dc so can technically run on a dc supply. The super famicom however as the above says, will not run on an AC supply. 
 

Tl;dr: Nintendo are stupid. 

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No not dangerous but why not just buy a cheap 230-100 volt step down with a Japanese outlet and use the original power supplies that Nintendo or others provide. It’s always worked for me whether it’s a JPN Neo Geo or a Sega Saturn or Super Famicom it will work as intended.

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8 hours ago, thegreathopper said:

No not dangerous but why not just buy a cheap 230-100 volt step down with a Japanese outlet and use the original power supplies that Nintendo or others provide. It’s always worked for me whether it’s a JPN Neo Geo or a Sega Saturn or Super Famicom it will work as intended.


When I got my Super Famicom in 1991 it didn’t have a power supply in the box. Isn’t the story that they assumed everyone had a Famicom power supply already?

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On 17/04/2022 at 13:38, thegreathopper said:

No not dangerous but why not just buy a cheap 230-100 volt step down with a Japanese outlet and use the original power supplies that Nintendo or others provide. It’s always worked for me whether it’s a JPN Neo Geo or a Sega Saturn or Super Famicom it will work as intended.

Console only bought from eBay, no power supply!

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4 hours ago, bplus said:

Because they are a fire risk? Shit!

I think its more that he said they had a tendancey to over voltage. There used to a be a good supplier in france i think called retrogamesupply but since brexit he doesnt ship to the uk anymore.

 

But i bought a psu for my mega cd and mega drive off ebay and one of them started to melt down as well. You takes your chances i suppose. Keep hearing good things about triad power supplies though.

On another note (and i know its not related) when the xbox super capacitor  problem appeared, i checked through all by og xboxs and found a couple where the caps on the psu were starting to bulge. Old consoles need maintenance.

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On 17/04/2022 at 21:58, Rex Grossman said:


When I got my Super Famicom in 1991 it didn’t have a power supply in the box. Isn’t the story that they assumed everyone had a Famicom power supply already?


You could be right, my Super Famicom came from Hong Kong and had a power supply I think… but I also do recall buying a Mega drive power supply to use with a USA SNES….. too many consoles and too many years to remember them all.

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So, I use and recommend this PSU:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07ZCSLR24/ref=cm_sw_r_apan_i_13Y9XERG024DHZ6X4Q64

 

It copes with up to 24w, is voltage incrementally adjustable between 9v and 20v, has a swappable cable so you can switch between centre pos and centre neg, and lots of swappable connector ends to fit any machine you can imagine. 

 

When you're looking for a replacement, you want one that's weighty (decent components) and barely gets warm. That means it's thermally efficient and operating at the right output levels, even under load (load, snarf). 

 

 

On 17/04/2022 at 13:38, thegreathopper said:

No not dangerous but why not just buy a cheap 230-100 volt step down with a Japanese outlet and use the original power supplies that Nintendo or others provide. It’s always worked for me whether it’s a JPN Neo Geo or a Sega Saturn or Super Famicom it will work as intended.

 

True, and it's pretty much fine, but for the AC units (where you plug a figure 8 lead into the back) it's worth looking at swapping a JPN PSU out with a modern DC solution. Cheaper to run, more efficient and you can't accidentally plug in a UK kettle lead and fry it....

 

Here's an example for the PSX: 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Sony-Playstation-1-RePSX-PSU-Power-Supply-12v-Universal-/303742901244?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&_trksid=p2349624.m46890.l49286&mkrid=710-127635-2958-0

 

For old stuff that takes DC voltage (little external power bricks) a newer one is a good investment, although even if it does die it's unlikely to take your console with it, thank Christ. Running your machine with an over-volted PSU is the easiest way to damage it, electrically speaking. 

 

On 17/04/2022 at 18:32, bwi said:

The guy who maintains and repairs my consoles has said for the last 3ish years that old megadrive power supplies should be thrown in the sea lol

 

They are pretty crap. Most revisions were over-volted to 10v as that was the only way it could give the console 9v under load. 

 

As for capacitors, there were tons in the late 80s and early 90s that were duff. Cheap.

 

The Neo Geo's tend to be fine (expensive) with the SNES and MD's being middling-to-poor, and the PCE's being abysmal. Don't think I've ever cracked open a PC Engine or GT and not seen bulging and corroded caps!

 

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I've never owned a US SNES but I think it's only the PAL SNES that does the weird AC thing. So should be cool :)

 

Yep, once you set the voltage that's it until you manually change it. And you have to hold the button a full 5 seconds before it'll change - can't be accidentally knocked into a different output. 

 

 

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