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Yorkshire Puddings - Help


Capwn
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Attempt 4 

 

75g almond milk

50g plain flour

1 egg

 

1tbsp sunflower oil in trays

 

batter left to rest 26 hours

 

I put the oven on at 500 and for the first time there was sizzling but it was so intense that it was flashing in the oven, way too scary so put it back to 425 and left another 10mins. Opened door when it was flashing.

 

Then I filled up holes with batter. Ignore the bottom but from left to right it's 1/4 fill, half filled and full. Left for 20mins.

 

Disaster, not even a dip this time. Think I'm going to just try lard next time. Other than that not really sure what to take from this attempt.

 

image.thumb.png.2b4a0f4a7485424c5cc9334e40709555.png

 

 

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We've honed our yorkshire process to a fine art over the years. Here is its current form, producing absolutely monstrous, delicious puddings. We make 8 with these amounts, using a 12 capacity muffin tin (e.g. the tray pictured above looks ok).

 

Note: exactly the same batter scaled up a bit is also perfect for toad in the hole.

 

Ingredients:

  • 100g plain flour, 20g SR
  • 125ml mixture of half milk (usually full fat) and water
  • 3 large eggs

Procedure:

  • Make the batter several hours before cooking. I typically do it in the morning after breakfast, ready for a mid afternoon roast.
  • Sieve the flour, obviously - we're not bloody animals.
  • Crack the eggs into a separate container then whisk and season.
  • Pour eggs into flour and whisk together until it's lovely and smooth. The secret to lump free batter is whisking it with just the eggs and not the rest of the liquid. You can add a little splash of it if you're finding it hard going though.
  • Slowly pour the liquid in while continuing to whisk
  • Admire your glorious concoction for as long as required then put it in the fridge to rest.
  • When it comes to cooking, get the oven heating up to 240°c, or as hot as your oven will go. (We have gradually turned this up over time and found, as with pizza bases, the hotter the better.)
  • Pour a little oil - my wife reckons vegetable oil is the best choice - and baste it around the sides of each cup you're going to use with a brush. I would guess we use a couple of tablespoons in total for 8? I usually just pour it into a couple then distribute it around from there.
  • Pre-heat in the oven for at least 10 minutes.
  • Take the tray out and quickly - but carefully! - dispense equal quantities of the batter into each cup using a ladle then get it back into the oven ASAP.
  • Cook for around 18 minutes. Do not open the oven door at all before this time is up unless you like to watch your beautiful puddings collapse before your very eyes.

Seriously, the best yorkies I've ever eaten or seen emerge at the end of this.

 

Exhibit A:

IMG_20220116_154148.thumb.jpg.0b433c939dd0eb637279d50f68e2d267.jpg

 

(I may steal the earlier tip about using a checkerboard pattern in the tray though! We always lay them out contiguously but that tweak would give them more room to erupt.)

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Oh, and @Capwn, with regards to the lactose - I'm assuming that's the problem - you may find that it's tolerated in such small amounts, e.g. only 7-8ml of milk per pudding in my recipe there. My wife is basically dairy free too but she's fine with eating one or two of these with a meal.

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Attempt 5

 

Loosely followed tips from @hmm here. I regret using a ladle, don't think that works for me as I panic a bit with how fast you have to do that step so bits splashed around into holes they were not meant to. The batter however I think was the best yet, I think I have that down but it's a mixture of heating/pouring and quantities I struggle with. I THINK that the top 3 on the left with no hole are down to me filling up the hole too high?

 

100g plain flour,

125ml mixture of almond milk 

3 large eggs

 

Batter left for 6 hours. 

Used lard for the first time, placed in oven at 450 for 15mins

Poured and placed back in oven for 20mins.

 

image.png.d77795778f66f0119ba182fa3c67b602.png

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Tried a further tweak with a longer resting time in the fridge - around 24h. This was for the batter's other job: toad in the hole.

 

20220130_172338.thumb.jpg.9423c954af818d75e6e3982510f3f87b.jpg

 

Those are standard 2oz sausages, to give you an idea of scale!

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Not sure what my next plan is, I think I have the batter down. It must be the batter to tray part OR even the amount of lard I put in. Next time will measure lard more carefully and use jug for pouring instead of ladle

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I feel like this is a social experiment and you're seeing how long people stay supporting you through this. Clearly the issue is to do with using non-dairy milk substitutes, as thats the only difference. When I first tried making yorkshires following a usual recipe they turned out great first time, it isn't some great skill, its a simple formula.

 

Can you make some with normal milk and see if they turn out good? 

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You're definitely hampering yourself with the non-dairy restriction but I think you can still get better results even sticking with that. Both the 50/50 milk/water ratio and the SR flour (or, equivalently, adding some baking soda) make a difference so I would give those a try.

 

And I wouldn't especially agree that the simplicity of a process particularly means it's easy to get good results, or at least that there's not still a range of results depending on how well that process is carried out. I mean, cooking a steak is basically the simplest possible culinary task really, yet there's a ridiculously wide spectrum of steak quality found in restaurants.

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MelizCooks on instagram has the absolute best yorkshire pudding recipe I've ever tried. I thought Delia's was good, but this just blows it out of the water.

 

Try it, not sure how you'll get on with using non-dairy milk, but the ratios seem quite different to those already tested, so might be worth a punt? Also, really easy to halve this recipe if you want to make 6. https://www.aeg.co.uk/local/recipes/christmas/meliz-berg-yorkshire-puddings/

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On 03/02/2022 at 07:31, littlelegs said:

MelizCooks on instagram has the absolute best yorkshire pudding recipe I've ever tried. I thought Delia's was good, but this just blows it out of the water.

 

Try it, not sure how you'll get on with using non-dairy milk, but the ratios seem quite different to those already tested, so might be worth a punt? Also, really easy to halve this recipe if you want to make 6. https://www.aeg.co.uk/local/recipes/christmas/meliz-berg-yorkshire-puddings/

 

This is a really interesting page, will definitely attempt this one.

 

- They actually specify the size of the eggs, not many (if at all?) recipes for yorkshire puddings do this.

- They whisk again AFTER taking the batter out of the fridge, not come across that before. Will try that.

- "the batter should really sizzle as it hits the hot oil", I hear this a lot but I don't think I hear a sizzle, perhaps a very light one at most. This recipe also suggests leaving the tray with oil for 15-20 mins. Not seen another recipe suggest more than 10mins, perhaps I need to be leaving it longer to help with the sizzle.

- Also they suggest 30mins baking or longer, most recipes don't ask for more than 20. So am curious to try 30.

- "As soon as you take the tray out of the oven, take the Yorkshire Puddings straight out of the tray and onto a cooking rack." Never heard of this either, curious how it helps?

 

 I'm probably going to try full-fat next time, just for the experience. When I finally get it right, I can experiment with alternatives.

 

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I make Yorkshire puddings with oat and soy milk, using the serious eats recipe, with no issues.

 

The things that most often go wrong are 

 

- oil not hot enought Or overfilled batter

- not baking for long enough to get them to stay puffed out or opening the door part way through and having them collapse 

 

Both those issues will give you unrisen little dumpling things.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Attempt 6

 

Batter left 4 hrs

100 Full Fat Milk (1st time I've tried this)

50 flour

2 Large Eggs

 

Oven @ 480

Tray with lard left 20mins

Tray with batter left 20mins

 

So these are probably the best overall 'puff up' I've done so far. Little burnt, I can fix that. However, what I find has absolute non logical are the 'holes'. No idea how to ensure it creates a good pocket.

 

edit : looking online, I think it's that I'm too casual when filling the holes. I just generally fill them but apparently it's critical that they only go 2/3rds up. So will be more careful with that next time.

 

edit : is it weird that I've kept these in a bag in the fridge? planning on having a cold pud with an afternoon coffee every day. They seem too good to throw away. 

 

 

image.thumb.png.a762f334fa738eb3d9c84b663647e850.png

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So next time I make them I'm going to freeze them. What's the general process from cooking from frozen? Do you have to leave out to thaw a bit? or just straight into the oven to warm up at a low heat?

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You can bang them straight into a hot oven from frozen for about 4-5 minutes and it'll do the trick. They (should) have light and airy structures so heat up quickly and you want them to stay crisp so you don't really want a low heat.

 

I just bang them straight on the oven shelves after the rest of my roast dinner has come out to serve up.

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Attempt 7

 

Only change here was filling the holes 3/4 instead of 4/4. Best result yet. Next I want to try doing the same BUT with one change, non full fat milk and see what happens. 

 

image.thumb.png.99fe525aa297b252e52cd396c860014a.png

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 16/02/2022 at 14:27, Capwn said:

Attempt 7

 

Only change here was filling the holes 3/4 instead of 4/4. Best result yet. Next I want to try doing the same BUT with one change, non full fat milk and see what happens. 

 

image.thumb.png.99fe525aa297b252e52cd396c860014a.png

 

Woah! Stonkers!

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Yeah, had 2 more from that set out of the freezer at the weekend. Put it straight into an oven, they were still quite hard when they came out but oddly by the time they were plated they had gone soft.

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  • 1 month later...

Attempt 8

 

Same setup as batch 7 BUT replaced full fat milk with almond milk. Taste n texture was similar but I do think non dairy milk makes puds look less like puds, if that makes sense?

 

image.thumb.png.a8bba7d36d604126d069daaceddb5b40.png

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I suspect it’s the lactose, which is a sugar and one of the things that caramelises and turns golden brown when cooking. There’s about 1tsp of sugar (lactose) per 100g milk, so perhaps look at your almond milk bottle and see if it’s got sugar in, if not try a teaspoon. 
 

Alternatively, it might be more complicated and be Maillard reactions which is the interplay of the protein and sugars with heat that leads to delicious browning (usually in meat). Might be tricky to replicate without proper milk.

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