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Best issue of a game/computer magazine ever?


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6 hours ago, Protocol Penguin said:

Heh, I remember when I read the early retro gaming websites, and a particularly great British fanzine, many 8-bit microcomputer classics were still less than a decade old, and 16-bit systems were definitely off-limit as “retro”. People who deny retro has a sliding timescale are weird.

 

edit: by early retro gaming, I mean 1995.


I don’t think people deny it has a sliding scale though. It’s that people say things made after a certain point don’t feel retro to them. I think many people (myself included) feel like what they personally think of as retro corresponds to a time in their life. I tend to think anything that came out after I graduated from university doesn’t feel retro to me. I think if it came out when I was an adult with a career it’s not that old. It is of course old but I don’t associate it with ‘the past’.

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12 hours ago, Rex Grossman said:


I don’t think people deny it has a sliding scale though. It’s that people say things made after a certain point don’t feel retro to them. I think many people (myself included) feel like what they personally think of as retro corresponds to a time in their life. I tend to think anything that came out after I graduated from university doesn’t feel retro to me. I think if it came out when I was an adult with a career it’s not that old. It is of course old but I don’t associate it with ‘the past’.

Nah, they definitely do exist, even if nowhere near the majority. Usually anything before the PlayStation 1 generation is their cut-off point, but sometimes even earlier machines. (Same people, if British micro fans, also tend to have a kneejerk dislike  of the NES – “no one owned one”.) So you’re agreeing with me, it’s all subjective. :) Just think it’s worth taking into account that when retro gaming emerged in 1995, it was barely three years since retailers like WH Smith stocked the last 8-bit micro games, and the last C64 and Amstrad magazines had just closed. (Admittedly much of the very early retro scene, particularly the American side, was more focused on the Atari VCS, Colecovision and so on to start with, but that quickly changed.)

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I remember a lot of people having a NES, even thought I've definitely heard people say no one had one before. I think it picked up a lot more quickly in the US. But by the time I started secondary school (89) they definitely weren't exotic at all.

I remember the first time I saw one and it looked incredibly futuristic though. Was in Hamleys and I wanted it massively but there was no way I was getting one. Then we went to America a short while after, and I remember they were absolutely everywhere. All the American kids had one and didn't have a clue what I was on about when I started talking to them about my Spectrum. 

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