Jump to content

Fruit Machine Emulation


mechamonkey
 Share

Recommended Posts

I used to love fruit machines, but stopped playing completely when they went up to 30p per play.  For whatever reason the fact that you could put a pound in and have 10p left over really pissed me off.

 

I occasionally play them on the pier near my UK house, at 2p or 10p a go.

 

I've been lucky in that I've only ever seen it as entertainment rather that a way to win money.

 

Would love to have emulated versions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Vimster said:

Not that I've been to the pub that much lately but it has been a while since I've heard the pump-rattle of a jackpot payout, you rarely even saw some bored day-drinker stick a pound in. The machine usually just sits there flashing away, part of the usual pub furniture.

Presumably the machines must still make enough money for venues to be worth renting out, but I imagine that sort of gambling doesn’t make anything like the revenues that it used to.

 

(Incidentally, I don’t like all the adverts on regular television and YouTube see you for online gambling – legislation really needs to catch up with that.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

30 years ago my Dad was on the board of a local Working Men's Club.  He showed me the accounts and the fruit machines were the number one profit maker on site by a mile.  It was like, 3 times what they made on beer sales or something.  I can't imagine it now, like has been said earlier the machines are there but you just don't see them being played much.  

 

I like the atmosphere of a casino and enjoy games of cards and roulette - the free drinks helps.  I think your night out can feel like you're getting some return on your investment.  But I stopped slinging change in the pub machines a long time ago.  

 

I do remember one time at Lancaster's The Alex, trying out a refill key and only managing to find the last payout and how much is in the hopper, and the volume controls.  All useless information, but we turned the machine up as loud as it could go then scrammed.  Someone then went over to play and you could hear the machine over the band playing. Didn't have the nerve to turn it back down again.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's a few things that have kept me away from poker and fruit machines.

 

Rev Stu's article was a big one but it was the icing on the cake. Really. But it was proof that the punters were being tricked and it's one of the best things he's ever done.

 

There was the hollowing out of the live music scene in my home city, pubs ditched stages and put in pokies. I once at a pub lunch watched a women with blank eyes feed in at least three 50 dollar notes into the machine. It was clear she'd been there most of the day.

 

It became such a plague that an episode of local drama series Love is a Four Letter Word had the publican drag out a pokie machine out of his bar and smash it with a baseball bat.

 

This song was pretty popular at the time.

 

 

From the notes attached to the video

 

Quote

It's a strange fact that our only commercial hit is essentially a protest song. It was played all around the country in 2000, and one regional network would back announce its title as 'I Wish I' so as not to offend local sponsors. After watching the local live music scene contract in the mid 90s due to poker machines, and then seeing our founding member Andy Lewis succumb to their allure, I penned this story of a musician playing the pokies where a few years before, at the same spot, he was playing his instrument. I had gambling on my mind because Andy, who didn't play in the band anymore, had just made me a bookcase and delivered it to my house by bus. The pokies had managed to make everything hard work for him. After this album was released Andy ended his life after putting a week’s wages in the pokies.

 

But what really put me off playing them was this great piece.

 

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-04-13/grogs---dont-bet-on-joys-of-pokies/56496

 

Quote

When I was working in the Cairns Casino I’d often arrive on the floor to replace a guy who had been in the industry as long as casinos had been in Australia.

He had started back at Wrest Point in a time when people would dress up to go to the casino, and the penalty rates for dealers were so outrageous that some used to work casual for half the year, then take the other half off skiing around Europe. He would often greet me by saying, “Welcome once again, young man to this international playground of the idle rich.” It was a standard joke the two of us had as we then looked around and saw no playground, and certainly no idle rich.

The line was a sort of gallows humour – an attempt to divert us from the grim task we were there to do – namely, take money from people, and make them feel good while doing it. One of the other jokes we had was to refer to the pokies in the casino as “wages” – they took people’s to pay ours.

This joke was unfortunately much nearer the truth.

 

I'm not sure it's the same in the UK but in Oz these machines have destroyed so many lives. Do the UK machines take large notes? When they got rid of restrictions on what the machines would accept it removed one of the big circuit breakers for players who would play these machines until their wages were eaten up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My grandparents ran a greasy spoon that alternated between having an arcade cab and a fruit machine. I always hated the fruity because obviously games were far superior.

 

I have an early memory of my grandad being really annoyed one day and pouring out a load of coins from the fruity onto the table. Loads of them were wrapped in silver foil. What was that about? Some way of tricking the coin mechanism?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Honestly @dumpster, I'm finding it hard to agree with most of that post.

 

Firstly:

18 hours ago, dumpster said:

Someone mentioned expert players.  Many fruit machines have cheats or bugs that facilitate a payout. For example, on the OXO machines that randomly hand out 3 nudges the prize is usually 4 nudges away, and players realised there's a cheat.  Do 2 nudges, then wait and don't make that third nudge.  The machine can be noisy but you just have to bear with it.  After about 30 seconds the machine does 2 nudges on its own and you win the prize.  Likewise, if you hold the cancel button on a gamble it slows down and makes it easier.  Expert players know this stuff and you see them "fiddling" the machine and getting the payouts. But none of this is affecting the payout ratio.  If you use one of these cheats, it's simply stopping a win dropping in on a later spin, robbing Peter to pay Paul. But the typical gambler thinks these cheats and tips give them an advantage so they play more.  But no extra money is coming out.

 

I feel you've completely missed the point with this, because of course it's robbing Peter to pay Paul, with the idea being you hope you are Paul. All of the 'tricks' you mention (plus others) are controlled by the programming too, you aren't 'getting one over the machine', it knows when it is offering them and such things are there to promote player engagement (at the expense of casual players, natch.) These various tricks (holds after nudges, holding three times in a row, cancel sometimes slowing down features etc) do give an advantage to people who know about them though - because they are able to take a win before the machine would otherwise look to award it.

 

An example is on old JPM machines: you could tell when the feature board would pay out a jackpot if you knew what you were doing. The clue was when the number reel would start spinning 1s and 12s during normal reel spins (i.e. what happens when you press 'start' - *not* when you were on the feature board). If it started doing this (it never did normally), then if you knew what features were capable of paying out the jackpot you could take that out of the machine long before a regular player would land it. The real trick is knowing when to walk with a profit in such situations.

 

But those are just cheap parlour tricks - the really knowledgeable players will know about machine emptier tactics, which are very much *definitely* making the machine pay when it doesn't want to and manipulating the coding in such a way as to mean a machine will go on a jackpot run when it really doesn't want to.

 

18 hours ago, dumpster said:

Finally, there are people who think they are clever, lurking, watching, swooping in as you leave and stealing your jackpot.  Sometimes they will win of course, but it's not because they timed it right, they are just lucky.  The fact is that the payout is fixed, and it's fixed over a mighty long time. The machine pays out whatever the operator sets it at, over the week, month, or maybe the life of the machine. With emulation you might spend a thousand pounds in one sitting and barely win anything. The machine can go on the take for as long as it wants and you'd never really know in a real-life situation because no-one walks into the arcade with a grand in £1 coins in their pocket.  This was the biggest revelation in emulation - you can play with unlimited money, play for hours solidly and see the overall behaviour of the machine.

 

Certainly back in the day of £6/8 jackpots you could observe people losing and make an educated guess within a few pounds of whether it was likely to pay out. Nowadays of course even the £15 jackpot machines could go on horrible periods with more than £100 taken before a jackpot paid out - that figure goes up a lot as the jackpot increased, but the machine would still offer a lot of low-level wins (say up to £4/5). You'd still lose money if it was in a bad mood and you got greedy on each feature board, but again, most games have various 'blocks' - by which I mean the machine will throw in regular low wins (say £2) and happily let you gamble up to, say, £4 nearly every time - but as soon as you hit that value, you would lose on a gamble no matter what; an 11 would go to a 12, a 2 to a 1. The machine would only let you pass that figure once it had taken enough money, at which point it would let you move to the next block (if it had one) or potentially let you gamble to the jackpot.

 

Now as a counter-point to the quote above, I would love to see anybody put a thousand pounds into *any* machine (even £1,000 jackpot casino machines) and win 'barely anything' no matter how bad a mood it is in unless somebody was deliberately trying to lose - and at that point you're presenting such an unrealistic hypothetical it's not really worth considering. You might not get a jackpot if it is a high value machine (i.e. jackpot over £250), but you would be offered decent wins throughout, because that kind of money would definitely skew the percentage and the machine would force wins on you.

 

There is also a known method called, simply, 'forcing', where you look to manipulate the percentage of the machine to the point it has to pay out a jackpot. Again, on old machines (and even up to £15 jackpots) this could be a somewhat viable method that could yield results within £10/20 (the idea being it would then pay out multiple jackpots). Key to this was as above - you had to refuse every win/lose every gamble until the machine would spin in the jackpot or give you an invincible feature board. This is another area where knowledgeable players would be able to get a feel for how receptive a machine might be within £4/5 of spins. You can still do this on some newer machines (not all), but it can cost an awful lot and, depending on the machine, you might just get a jackpot and nothing else.

 

I also want to address this:

19 hours ago, dumpster said:

Someone mentioned expert players.

Firstly, such players do exist and these are would not be considered people who know not what 'holds after nudges' are. You I'm sure know this, but they are people who know the actual tricks which rob Peter *and* Paul and give it all to you, through emptiers.

 

I believe that emptiers were originally code left in by the engineers who made the games so they could then go and clear them out once they were released out in the wild - but that could be the urban myth. Regardless, there are ways to manipulate the machine into doing stuff it really doesn't want to do, to the point that the pound coin tube runs out and you have thereby 'emptied' it of cash. Some of the methods are incredibly obtuse, some more straightforward, but they exist and will work if you know what you are doing (unless they get patched out).

 

I was just a casual player who knows some of the parlour tricks I mentioned above and ultimately walked away from machines when the £25 jackpots took over everything (though practically I lost interest at the £15/30p play stage) - so I've never used an emptier, but the beauty of emulation is that you can perform them in that (as well as see every other trick and also monitor the payout percentage as you play) and, as the emulation uses the actual roms from the real machines, this is exactly what will happen in the wild too. There are also YouTube videos of people performing them on the emulator, so you can replicate it on your own if you wanted - and as I say, some of the methods require a lot of critical thinking and sticking to a plan.

 

You still need a bit of fortune, of course - but as I say, a proper 'expert' player will probably know the cycle of a machine well enough to be able to see quite quickly if the setup is going to work.

 

I didn't intend to make this such a long post, so, yeah. Modern fruit machines are bad news, kids.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I remember an urban legend that if you took 2 old 5ps and wrapped them in foil the machine would think you had a pound coin. But the coin mechs are sophisticated and I doubt that really was a thing.  Having said that, in the late 1980s Shell garages did a promotion that gave you silver coins that worked as 10ps in the arcade. We went down there with a bag full. 

 

Also you could buy tokens from the manufacturers for, I think, £17 for £1000 worth.  I even owned a machine which cost me £25 but came with about £300 in tokens still in the tube.  I spent those in the promenade arcades, settling for cash prizes wherever possible.  That same year each arcade put little metal teeth on the tokens slot and the tokens had grooves in them that matched the slot. Suddenly standard tokens were useless and tokens you won could only be redeemed in the same arcade. But I did contemplate buying a grand in tokens and heading to the arcades, at least until the teeth and grooves came into force.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Gabe great post. Although there's points there that we agree on, we're just coming at it from a different angle.  I've never heard of emptiers, but that sounds like that's criminal behaviour by the software designers, putting in a backdoor so they can empty machines in the wild later.  The manufacturers are not condoning that obviously.  But the cheats, the methods, the logic that they deliberately program in never means extra money is coming out.  

 

For example (try using save states in an emulator to see it for yourself), if the machine wants to pay out (perhaps it's way under and needs to fix things) then it's going to pay. It might offer you 5 numbers on the reels and the chance to hold.  Don't hold them and the same numbers will spin in. Say lower than a 2 and a one spins in.  Reload, go higher instead and a 3 spins in. It needs to pay out.  You call this 'forcing' , and everything you say in your post rings true, but when you emulate you can see how the cycle goes on over such a long time that I don't believe an individual player can give themselves enough of an advantage by knowing where the machine is in the cycle.  Even if you could tell, the machine might change it as soon as you play. 

 

We are talking about machines here that literally ask "heads or tails", wait for your response and then switch in a double headed coin to ensure you lose.  An expert player can use some "secret" feature that the manufacturers put out there, they win a jackpot, make that link (skill lead to prize) and think they got one over on the arcade.  In fact, had they not used that cheat the prize may have dropped in on the next spin anyway - there was no way to possibly know, then emulation with save states came along and proved the games cheat.  That machine, no matter who plays it and how, is going to pay out the amount it's set to, not a penny more or less.  In a short term single player session you may win, you may lose, but ultimately your skill isn't going to get extra money out.

 

Cheers for an interesting post, I'd never heard of emptiers before. I'm sure as soon as the manufacturers learn of them they get removed - that's genuine cheating.

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All these machines, at least now are audited externally to avoid special button presses or even bugs in the code that just dump out jackpots.

 

Sometimes though bugs do creep through, there’s a famous story about a guy who’d go around Vegas and found out how to win the huge jackpot (something like $50k) on a multi machine slot. The way it worked is you’d play till you won the jackpot on one of the games, but because the money in your bank is carried between games and you can swap out anytime, the bug meant he was able to to go into other games where instantly the jackpot was awarded. He got caught eventually because whilst he went to multiple venues he too quickly went back to existing places he’d won at and it was odd for the machines to even pay out the jackpot let alone multiple times in a year, to the same guy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah and I'd imagine this is the best protection any machine has, that any dodge would be spotted because idiots get greedy. If you ever figure out something like that you need to tour the casinos in one day then get the fuck out of town and head for somewhere else.

 

On 17/09/2021 at 17:21, Gabe said:

Quiz machines are interesting in how they can control the payouts, as @dumpsteraptly demonstrated. My friend used to play the Crystal Maze quiz game and it would stiff you not only by having too many silvers (no matter how long you had on the clock), but it would also allow fewer puzzles in each zone along the way.

 

It was plainly obvious even at the time, but he quite liked the puzzles so at least he was having some fun for his 50p. 

 

 

Yeah, before I ever knew about these things this was the giveaway to me too, there was one in my local bowling alley and it was plainly obvious that after someone did well the next few massively increased the number of silvers in the end game.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, dumpster said:

@Gabe great post. Although there's points there that we agree on, we're just coming at it from a different angle.  I've never heard of emptiers, but that sounds like that's criminal behaviour by the software designers, putting in a backdoor so they can empty machines in the wild later.  The manufacturers are not condoning that obviously.  But the cheats, the methods, the logic that they deliberately program in never means extra money is coming out.

Like I say, it might be an urban myth, but however they have crept into the code, the methods are there all the same.

 

8 hours ago, dumpster said:

For example (try using save states in an emulator to see it for yourself), if the machine wants to pay out (perhaps it's way under and needs to fix things) then it's going to pay. It might offer you 5 numbers on the reels and the chance to hold.  Don't hold them and the same numbers will spin in. Say lower than a 2 and a one spins in.  Reload, go higher instead and a 3 spins in. It needs to pay out.  You call this 'forcing' , and everything you say in your post rings true, but when you emulate you can see how the cycle goes on over such a long time that I don't believe an individual player can give themselves enough of an advantage by knowing where the machine is in the cycle.  Even if you could tell, the machine might change it as soon as you play. 

This is talking about the 'block' I mentioned in my previous post, though it's worth noting that even when the machine wants to pay out, it'll kill you if you go lower on a 2/higher on an 11 no matter how happy it is and just find another way to offer the win. If the number gambles worked on those numbers it would ruin the illusion of the machine offering a 'fair' risk. Even when the machine really wants to pay out, it won't reward deliberate stupidity such as that (unless you have an invincible board feature, in which case every gamble will be in your favour - but this is a different proposition and it will make it clear to you that you can't lose.)

 

Also, the tricks I mentioned aren't 'forcing'; forcing is a process over a reasonable number of spins (say ~100) where you deliberately refuse any win offer, so you would do the 'lower on a 2' to lose, if you were offered a win on nudges you'd choose a non-winning combination etc. You have to do this a number of times to put the machine in the mood to then pay out, ultimately you hope, a bigger prize. Using those tricks in isolation won't do anything to the overall cycle.

 

You'd also be surprised how effectively forcing can work for not a great expenditure - obviously behind the scenes the machine needs to be flirting around the long-term percentage. But you'd be more surprised at how easily a keen observer can tell if the machine is in a bad patch of the cycle or not - sometimes it will be a case of what symbols are dropping on the reels (i.e. if the machine is regularly putting the jackpot symbols in view, for some machines it means it is getting happier; if a machine doesn't even give a single nudge in £4/5, or doesn't offer any second-holds on the reels then it can be in a mean mood). Sometimes it isn't about when you think a machine might pay out, it's about knowing when it definitely isn't.

 

8 hours ago, dumpster said:

We are talking about machines here that literally ask "heads or tails", wait for your response and then switch in a double headed coin to ensure you lose.  An expert player can use some "secret" feature that the manufacturers put out there, they win a jackpot, make that link (skill lead to prize) and think they got one over on the arcade.  In fact, had they not used that cheat the prize may have dropped in on the next spin anyway - there was no way to possibly know, then emulation with save states came along and proved the games cheat.  That machine, no matter who plays it and how, is going to pay out the amount it's set to, not a penny more or less.  In a short term single player session you may win, you may lose, but ultimately your skill isn't going to get extra money out.

Again, yes, the machines definitely cheat and will make you lose when it doesn't want to pay out (the 'block' I've mentioned a few times). But there is an element of skill that can be employed to work in your favour. You say players may make the link between 'secrets' and skill but actually they are wrong, but I disagree. As mentioned in my previous post, the whole point is you are hoping to use your knowledge to ensure the machine will pay out wins sooner than would otherwise be the case. Now I agree that the machine will eventually pay something out anyway (it might not be as much, it might be spread over 5/10 spins instead of a single credit), but your aim is to do it as quickly as possible to make the biggest profit.

 

I don't disagree that you aren't 'getting one over the arcade' (I said as much in my post) - you are just extracting the most value in the most efficient way. Consider a machine needs to pay out £30 to hit it's percentage (and the percentage calculations are updated with every single spin, you can see this via emulation). For arguments' sake we'll say the player with some knowledge and tricks gets a hold after nudging two jackpot symbols onto the reels. A novice would probably hold the reels again, and would not get the win - the knowledgeable player would let them spin and thus get the jackpot - job done, percentage met.

 

Now the machine might then offer the novice player some low-level wins that amount to £15 over the course of the next £3/4 of credits - but then that's it. The machine will have added to the long-term percentage but will perhaps instead be saving the wins it didn't pay out for a bigger streak down the line - but that could be another £50 away from happening. For the knowledgeable player they have taken the £30 for an outlay of only a few pounds, and walked away knowing the machine was done for a bit. In both cases the machine might be at the same percentage 200 spins down the line, but the canny player made a profit, the less-experienced walked away chewing a loss (and somebody else benefitted through luck.)

 

It doesn't always work like that of course - the actual programming on fruit machines is incredibly complex - but with the beauty of emulation and save states you can test this out: Get to a point where the machine is hovering around percentage (not massively above or below), and at the point you are offered a big win (say, one of the top-3 cash prizes) create a save state. In one scenario, take the win and see how the machine reacts over the next 100 spins; in the other, ignore or deliberately lose the win and, again, see how it changes the gameplay over the following 100 spins - but play them normally (you could start 'forcing' it from here over those spins and at some point it will go into a very happy mode but that wouldn't be the purpose of this little experiment). It won't follow the same path.

 

The above would work best on all machines, though the bigger jackpots (>£15) will, naturally, go through longer phases.

.

.

.

I'm really enjoying this discussion though. Playing fruit machines used to the focus of a night out for my friends and I back in the mid/late 90s, either pubs, Southend or, sometimes, service stations. We used to win more often than not and that was just using some of the basic stuff mentioned in my posts - we certainly didn't know any of the advanced stuff. Whilst we knew the machines cheated long before the Fair Play campaign, the cycles they went through were generally short enough that even when it didn't want to pay out, you would get frequent feature boards and they were actually fun to play. As said previously, when things got to the £15 jackpots the gameplay suffered massively and they were much less of a way to while away a few hours with friends and we stopped playing them (though we would get some big wins - I think our biggest was about £70 on a JPM Snakes and Ladders from a £15 jackpot machine).

 

I have got back into the emulation of them recently though, and with no risk of losing real money they can be fun to play in the background and mess around with (i.e. force them way, way under percentage to see them go crazy, or play £20 in a machine/series of machines and see how much you can 'win' playing normally etc). Everything is available from old £2.40 jackpots right up to £400 club machines - but the heyday was back in the late 90s, with JPM in particular knocking out some great, playable stuff up to £8 jackpots. I think I've posted before that I converted my shed many, many years ago and used to have 4 actual machines (plus a Wrestlefest arcade cab) - my friend and I used to have a blast playing them. Good days.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to work for one of the Uks largest fruit machine operators. I wasn't front line or hands on with them but generally as has been said they operate on a payout %. I think it was 84% but could be altered. 

 

Whilst I was there we were making more of the fruities 'smart' in that we could see the remote telemetry of what had been played, payouts, fault find etc. It was interesting hearing some of the stats. One machine used to get 15 minute play at about 7am when the pub was clearly closed. Turns out it was the cleaner.

 

On the multi game machines with a selection for the user, if we saw one not getting much play we could remotely replace it with another game.

 

Dedicated machines, especially Deal or No Deal always did well. We had so many of those I prayed there was never an Operation Yewtree moment for Noel. 

 

In short, its a mugs game but for a lot of pubs the profit share is enough to let them just about break even and continue trading. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Back when I was a kid, jackpots in the local club were £75, with it being 5p a spin. I used to hunt for pound coins down the back of the benches, then go into the empty function room to play the machine there.

 

By the time I was an adult it was all 25p a go, with £15 jackpots. Sod that!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Done a bit more fiddling today.
I got hold of a cheapo old Intel NUC (it's absolutely tiny but suprisingly great for emulation) and got the MFME emulator all working on it then added them to the touch-play front end (free).
So I just need to get hold of a touch screen monitor now (to use in vertical mode) and I'll have the mame cab, pinball and new bonus fruity selection all on the go :)
WIP crappy screenshot of me faffing about on a normal widescreen monitor.
6sYA9vQ.png

Even crappier shakeycam video of WIP

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 16/09/2021 at 11:12, mechamonkey said:

Apologies if this triggers some peoples habits in advance.
I'm very middle aged now and yet I've successfully manged to avoid ever playing any fruit machines.
Along with mountains of accumulated gaming stuff over the years I also have an arcade cab and virtual pinball so I thought, you know what would fit in well with those, some sort of fruity, thus began my rabbit hole journey.
So in the last few days I've joined various emulation forums etc and finally got my head round it.
I've got MFME up and running perfectly and even set up "Arcade Simulator" to have a wander round my own private collection of gamblers.
Next step is to buy some sort of touchscreen and mini pc to set up with a touch-play front end for MFME.

The main thing I have learned is I was very very right not to pump any money into these ever, and never will.

Anyway here's a quick video I did for a friend showing him what I'd been up to (Arcade Simulator) thought some of you might get a kick out of it  (apologies if embedding doesnt work, I set it to 18+ because of gambling)
 

 

Is that a general frontend you can download, or is this something you built? It looks great for the immersion, I'd love to have a mini arcade to walk around!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 19/09/2021 at 13:03, Ketchup said:

All these machines, at least now are audited externally to avoid special button presses or even bugs in the code that just dump out jackpots.

 

Sometimes though bugs do creep through, there’s a famous story about a guy who’d go around Vegas and found out how to win the huge jackpot (something like $50k) on a multi machine slot. The way it worked is you’d play till you won the jackpot on one of the games, but because the money in your bank is carried between games and you can swap out anytime, the bug meant he was able to to go into other games where instantly the jackpot was awarded. He got caught eventually because whilst he went to multiple venues he too quickly went back to existing places he’d won at and it was odd for the machines to even pay out the jackpot let alone multiple times in a year, to the same guy.

There was a brilliant story about  2 guys that worked out how to calculate the random number seed used in Casino Keno games.  Keno is played over and over again all day every day on screens around the casino and these guys stayed in the hotel room with a laptop, typing in the results until their program worked out the seed and predicted the next game.  They won the jackpot. They claimed the jackpot.  Immediately security turned up and examined their room and they were found to have been cheating.  So, what raised the suspicion of the casino?

 

Someone won at Keno.  That's all they needed.  It was virtually proof of some bad behaviour somewhere because no-one ever wins. That's why I never play those games.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So I downloaded Arcade Simulator (instead of working) and had a quick play around with it and it is really, really good and immersive. I imagine you could use the idea to do arcade games if that was your interest, but there's something quite beautiful about all the attract sequences (and I know that companies spend a chunk of money on the psychology around enticing people towards them).

 

Just being able to move around in a 3D space to go and play a machine makes it so much better than just using the emulator - was this what the old Xbox Games Room did? If so, I can definitely see the appeal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 22/09/2021 at 16:47, Gabe said:

So I downloaded Arcade Simulator (instead of working) and had a quick play around with it and it is really, really good and immersive. I imagine you could use the idea to do arcade games if that was your interest, but there's something quite beautiful about all the attract sequences (and I know that companies spend a chunk of money on the psychology around enticing people towards them).

 

Just being able to move around in a 3D space to go and play a machine makes it so much better than just using the emulator - was this what the old Xbox Games Room did? If so, I can definitely see the appeal.

which download was this? the coin ops one?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, Parappa said:

which download was this? the coin ops one?

It's the Arcade Simulator over at Desert Island Fruits (you need to donate to be able to download anything), it's fruit machine only right now, I don't know whether it will branch out into coin-ops too (or is there already something similar out there for them?)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Just a quick reply, got this all working a treat on my mini pc and new touch screen, also got pub quiz touch screen stuff going too.

Gratuous but rubbish pic I just took for a friend which shows my desk area with a load of stuff on the go, touch screen (in portrait mode for fruities in the middle), very happy :)

kOfMe4k_d.webp?maxwidth=640&shape=thumb&

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, mechamonkey said:

Just a quick reply, got this all working a treat on my mini pc and new touch screen, also got pub quiz touch screen stuff going too.

Gratuous but rubbish pic I just took for a friend which shows my desk area with a load of stuff on the go, touch screen (in portrait mode for fruities in the middle), very happy :)

kOfMe4k_d.webp?maxwidth=640&shape=thumb&

Which virtual pinball machine is that? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Parappa said:

Which virtual pinball machine is that? 

One I made with the crappiest pc imaginable, it's pretty compact, half size, works totally fine but struggled a bit on FX3 so I stick to FX2 mostly. Again uses the touch play frontend which I use on the fruit machines.
Apologies for my crap pics.
X0fWHgF.png

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 22/09/2021 at 16:47, Gabe said:

Just being able to move around in a 3D space to go and play a machine makes it so much better than just using the emulator - was this what the old Xbox Games Room did? If so, I can definitely see the appeal.

 

It wasn't, it was my biggest problem with it as a concept.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, mechamonkey said:

One I made with the crappiest pc imaginable, it's pretty compact, half size, works totally fine but struggled a bit on FX3 so I stick to FX2 mostly. Again uses the touch play frontend which I use on the fruit machines.
Apologies for my crap pics.
X0fWHgF.png

 

That's great. Don't suppose you can point me in the direction of plans etc for it? Or did you just create yourself. I really want to get one made and half size will probably be perfect for the room it's going to have to fit in! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 16/09/2021 at 18:04, dumpster said:

If you like the sound of this, give it a go.  It's completely fascinating to see how the machine squirms and does everything it can to make sure you cannot win, but as it doesn't understand youre using cheat codes it goes completely crazy.  

 

This is much more likely how Skynet would actually be born. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.