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Wildermyth - party-based procedural storytelling RPG out now to rave reviews!


Doctor Shark
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Wildermyth follows heroes over their whole careers, from their pitchfork days to their powerful primes, and on into old age and memory. It’s a party-based procedural storytelling RPG where tactical combat and story decisions will alter your world and reshape your cast of characters.

 

 

Eurogamer Essential

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Years pass as tales are written in this dazzling game of tactics and narrative, choices and memories.

 

PC Gamer - 90%

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A legend-building RPG that deserves to define the next decade.

 

IGN - 9 and Editor's Choice award

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Indie RPG Wildermyth aims to combine the best of storytelling with the best of procedural generation and succeeds, thanks to great writing, solid tactics, and some very clever design decisions.

 

Guardian 5 stars

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Witty writing, evocative art and engrossing battles combine in a wonderful homage to classic tabletop games

 

Rock, Paper, Shotgun 'Bestest Best' award

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I cannot possibly express to you how brilliant Wildermyth is nor how fully I recommend you play it and get started on your own. It is one of the best games I have ever played and it will bring you more delight than you thought possible.

 

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For anyone like me who bought it last year, it's really become a lot more satisfying and polished; well worth giving another try now that it's out of early access. Very enjoyable taking your characters through campaigns and having them return in other stories as legendary figures, and the semi-procedural storytelling is great throughout.

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I don’t believe so, no. Certainly not mentioned in anything I’ve read about it. If your character reaches zero hit points you can either choose to run away, incurring some kind of permanent penalty or injury, or go down fighting, doing massive damage as they go out in a blaze of heroic glory. 

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I'm pleased this is getting some love now it is in full release. I bought it early last year and was completely obsessed with it, it's so charming and you build such a rapport with your quirky group of characters.

 

As @Wiper has said, it is a far more polished experience now too, I'd highly recommend it to anyone.

 

 

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I bought this a couple of weeks ago and have put 40 hours in to it already. Absolutely great game, and you really feel attached to the characters you take through the stories.

 

The way the game is designed basically guarantees that they'll have some unique or quirky aspect to them that you'll remember for when you can recruit them in other stories. My favourite character so far is one I played in my first game and I have recruited in every game since if I get the chance. In the first story, her head transformed in to a crow. And then she got cursed with a rat's tail for trying to steal a magical artefact. She's had all kinds of mad adventures since then, but I don't want to spoil the game any more than I already have.

 

If you like fantasy even a little bit this is a must buy. If you're a DnD nerd, then this is a why haven't you bought it yet, you absolute moron?

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39 minutes ago, The Grand Pursuivant said:

I bought this a couple of weeks ago and have put 40 hours in to it already. Absolutely great game, and you really feel attached to the characters you take through the stories.

 

The way the game is designed basically guarantees that they'll have some unique or quirky aspect to them that you'll remember for when you can recruit them in other stories. My favourite character so far is one I played in my first game and I have recruited in every game since if I get the chance. In the first story, her head transformed in to a crow. And then she got cursed with a rat's tail for trying to steal a magical artefact. She's had all kinds of mad adventures since then, but I don't want to spoil the game any more than I already have.

 

If you like fantasy even a little bit this is a must buy. If you're a DnD nerd, then this is a why haven't you bought it yet, you absolute moron?

Oh, you bastard, I'm probably going to have to buy this now. I'd put it on my wishlist after reading the OP and the EG review, but I've been trying to clear up a Game pass backlog, and also save cash. This does sound exactly what I want to play right now though. And the next two days are my days off...

 

Edit: It's downloading now... :)

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31 minutes ago, iknowgungfu said:

How long does it take to get into this game? Does it have a long intro per game/run? My gaming time is properly restricted at the moment but this sounds like what I hoped Octopath was going to be. 


I knew I liked this game about 20 minutes in.
 

In terms of intro, you pick your characters, then the story starts for whichever campaign you decide to play. How long it takes you to start depends on your reading speed and how long you want to spend looking at the artwork in the story panels!


It’s also very kind with saving. Can save at pretty much any point in the game.

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1 hour ago, Jamie John said:

What's this comparable with? Banner Saga? Slay the Spire? Divinity OS 2?

 

None of the above, really. In structure it's a little closer to Banner Saga: you have discrete story, tactics and strategy layers, and like Banner Saga decisions in the story can affect the other two elements by gaining/losing/changing available characters (though unlike Banner Saga, having characters get downed in the tactical layer can also lead to them dying/being injured). Also like Banner Saga, large parts of the story come down to character dynamics/relationships, rather than being monofocussed on The Plot.

 

However, it's a lot more lighthearted generally, and said relationships are dynamic, rather than hard-coded into the plot. And indeed, the stories are very different in scale: we're talking multiple, discrete campaigns, each telling their own story, that take maybe six hours to complete (themselves split into several mini-campaigns). Meanwhile, the main 'campaign stories' make up maybe 20% of the actual storytelling; the majority comes through random events, the nature and outcomes of which are influenced not only by your decisions, but by the nature and relationships of your characters, which are themselves a mixture of random chance and player choice.

 

Meanwhile, each time you start a new campaign, despite their stories being distinct, you may end up encountering characters from your previous campaigns. As these have become legendary/mythical characters, they can often end up being subtly (or not so subtly) different from what you remember; changed by the retelling. It's a fun conceit, and well executed.

 

It's very much its own thing, is what I'm saying.

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21 minutes ago, Wiper said:

 

None of the above, really. In structure it's a little closer to Banner Saga: you have discrete story, tactics and strategy layers, and like Banner Saga decisions in the story can affect the other two elements by gaining/losing/changing available characters (though unlike Banner Saga, having characters get downed in the tactical layer can also lead to them dying/being injured). Also like Banner Saga, large parts of the story come down to character dynamics/relationships, rather than being monofocussed on The Plot.

 

However, it's a lot more lighthearted generally, and said relationships are dynamic, rather than hard-coded into the plot. And indeed, the stories are very different in scale: we're talking multiple, discrete campaigns, each telling their own story, that take maybe six hours to complete (themselves split into several mini-campaigns). Meanwhile, the main 'campaign stories' make up maybe 20% of the actual storytelling; the majority comes through random events, the nature and outcomes of which are influenced not only by your decisions, but by the nature and relationships of your characters, which are themselves a mixture of random chance and player choice.

 

Meanwhile, each time you start a new campaign, despite their stories being distinct, you may end up encountering characters from your previous campaigns. As these have become legendary/mythical characters, they can often end up being subtly (or not so subtly) different from what you remember; changed by the retelling. It's a fun conceit, and well executed.

 

It's very much its own thing, is what I'm saying.

Sold!

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1 hour ago, iknowgungfu said:

How long does it take to get into this game? Does it have a long intro per game/run? My gaming time is properly restricted at the moment but this sounds like what I hoped Octopath was going to be. 

I'm one and a half hours in, and whilst I've enjoyed what I've played there's been a lot of text, and a lot of stuff to digest. The text has actually been pretty good (for videogame standards, at least) so I'm not begrudging it that, and clearly I've not got at all the mechanics yet. And I very nearly really like the art style of the comic book scenes (it's good, it just could be slightly better here and there).

 

I think once I'm up to speed I'll love it, but I hate having to learn stuff (I'd rather there was a short tutorial that got it all out of the way, and then let me play the game with all the info, rather than drip-feeding it to me). There's clearly loads you have to learn as you go anyway - what's a good use of your time, what are your priorities, what are resources for, what effect are all my character choices having etc. So for this first game I'm resigned to screwing a lot up (even though I already feel quite attached to my little characters (I've named them The Band Of Muthas)).

 

I'm not one for stories in games generally, but this definitely feels different, and I'm really intrigued to see how it varies from game to game. I've already made one decision I wasn't comfortable with, and suspect it won't be my last. I'm starting to get to grips with the core combat, and I really like it. It's a genre I like anyway, but there's some fresh stuff in there. I reckon I'll be playing this for a good long while - tbh. I just hope it hurries up a tad once it's finally taught me everything.

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2 hours ago, MarkN said:

I'm one and a half hours in, and whilst I've enjoyed what I've played there's been a lot of text, and a lot of stuff to digest. The text has actually been pretty good (for videogame standards, at least) so I'm not begrudging it that, and clearly I've not got at all the mechanics yet. And I very nearly really like the art style of the comic book scenes (it's good, it just could be slightly better here and there).

 

I think once I'm up to speed I'll love it, but I hate having to learn stuff (I'd rather there was a short tutorial that got it all out of the way, and then let me play the game with all the info, rather than drip-feeding it to me). There's clearly loads you have to learn as you go anyway - what's a good use of your time, what are your priorities, what are resources for, what effect are all my character choices having etc. So for this first game I'm resigned to screwing a lot up (even though I already feel quite attached to my little characters (I've named them The Band Of Muthas)).

 

I'm not one for stories in games generally, but this definitely feels different, and I'm really intrigued to see how it varies from game to game. I've already made one decision I wasn't comfortable with, and suspect it won't be my last. I'm starting to get to grips with the core combat, and I really like it. It's a genre I like anyway, but there's some fresh stuff in there. I reckon I'll be playing this for a good long while - tbh. I just hope it hurries up a tad once it's finally taught me everything.


Honestly, it’s a game that rewards mistakes. In my last campaign, during the final bottle, I screwed up massively and managed to get one of my hunters in trouble. He was standing next to his mystic father, who was basically essential to my whole battle plan. The game offered me the choice of letting the hunter die, or having his father die in his place. I think you know what I chose.

 

I won the battle in the end. But it took way longer than it should have. Even though I had no intention of doing so before the fight, I upgraded the father and the sons legendary status at the end of the campaign.


A worthy sacrifice requires honour.

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37 minutes ago, The Grand Pursuivant said:


Honestly, it’s a game that rewards mistakes. In my last campaign, during the final bottle, I screwed up massively and managed to get one of my hunters in trouble. He was standing next to his mystic father, who was basically essential to my whole battle plan. The game offered me the choice of letting the hunter die, or having his father die in his place. I think you know what I chose.

 

I won the battle in the end. But it took way longer than it should have. Even though I had no intention of doing so before the fight, I upgraded the father and the sons legendary status at the end of the campaign.


A worthy sacrifice requires honour.

I've not got back to it yet, but yes - I sacrificed someone I could have saved. And then felt awful. And then the game let me build a grave for them, so obviously that's a no-brainer, but as the time spent building it passes more calamities kick in, and make my life harder. It's really very good. Will take a long time to learn, but I'm happy to be in for the long haul.

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45 minutes ago, The Grand Pursuivant said:


Honestly, it’s a game that rewards mistakes. In my last campaign, during the final bottle, I screwed up massively and managed to get one of my hunters in trouble. He was standing next to his mystic father, who was basically essential to my whole battle plan. The game offered me the choice of letting the hunter die, or having his father die in his place. I think you know what I chose.

 

I won the battle in the end. But it took way longer than it should have. Even though I had no intention of doing so before the fight, I upgraded the father and the sons legendary status at the end of the campaign.


A worthy sacrifice requires honour.


No, what did you choose? 
 

I think I would have the father make the noble sacrifice. He’s lived his life, he’s proud of his son and will watch over him, always, but it’s time for him to live his own life. 
 

😭

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On the flip side, a bereaved father, haunted by his failure to save his son, striving to make the world a better place for everyone else's children is a pretty strong story too... 

 

Damn I need to buy this.

 

(I would have saved the son FWIW).

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