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Games that take too long to start


dumpster
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2 hours ago, Benny said:

 

You might have hated it but it's a shame to spoil that very specific moment for anyone in a thread not directly related to the game in question. It's not that old.


I changed it but let’s be honest, I can’t imagine more than 3 people globally had the patience to get that far

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One of the best intros was Bioshock, you're watching a cutscene and the plane crashes you're in the water still thinking its a cutscene and nothing is happening you push the stick and are like oh shit the game has started. I thought that was absolutely incredible the first time I played it. 

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On 03/06/2021 at 08:48, dumpster said:

There are 2 categories here.  First you have those games that give you an unskipable logo for the dev, the publisher, the engine, the game logo etc. You mash start for longer than it took to load Jetpac on a Spectrum. You agree to terms and conditions. You're invited to log in to some services or other. So frustrating. Every time.

 

Forza Horizon 4 (not on Series X).

 

On 03/06/2021 at 08:48, dumpster said:

But for me, it's the games that take too long to get to the game proper.

 

Also Forza Horizon 4.

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I really struggle with starting new games on the whole. Without exaggerating I'd say the first hour of 80% of the stuff I play is tiresome - which is a bit damming when I purposefully avoid stuff with slow openings.

 

I'm perfectly prepared to put my hands up and say I'm a rather impatient man but I find it really baffling that people are defending games not kicking in until after three hours or more. Sure, I can understand that the quality of the overall experience outweighs the initial cost, but to say the long boring bit is good as well, actually...? Yeah, I don't get that. Sounds like Stockholm Syndrome. 

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On the topic of JRPGs, I’ve caught up with a few older ones in recent years (Chrono Trigger this year, FFVI last year,  Persona 1 and 2 a while back) and even they have a bunch of exposition to begin with, but because it’s all done with sprites and no voice acting (well, a few voiced lines in Persona) there’s something very “economical” about it. It doesn’t need to trim the fat because it can’t add that much fat to begin with.

 

I’ll be curious to see what Neo TWEWY is like - the first game had quite a bit of exposition and it needed to have a slow pace in order to explain the battle system, but it had minimal cutscenes and voice acting. But now the new game is coming to more powerful home consoles…

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I may be the outlier here, but I really love slow long atmospheric introductions to games. They are often my favourite parts. And for me the action always hits harder when it's delayed.

I also don't at all agree with the idea that it needs to be consistent with gameplay to come later in the game. A wonderful example for me in Yakuza 3. Yak 3 as an overall game I enjoyed, it was Yakuza and anyone who likes Yakuza knows what to expect from that. But not the intro, the intro was not typical Yakuza at all, in fact it was almost the opposite of it, you spend hours playing with and running after children at an orphanage in Okinawa. It was incredibly sweet and peaceful and picturesque. Certainly some people would find it boring, but for me it was the best Yakuza has ever been and my emotional investment in that orphanage carried me through the rest of the game. Yak 4 had none of this and I didn't even make past its opening chapter I got so bored.

 

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On 03/06/2021 at 22:18, the_debaser said:

Interactive movies like Last of Us and Uncharted should also stop it with the pseudo cut scenes where you have to hold forward or press the odd button to make the game move along. I actually think these are more unforgivable than a standard cut scene as you’re forced not only to endure it, but to also interact when you simply don’t want to. It’s real shitty game design

 

I'm with you on unskippable cutscenes, but this bit is more "things I don't like shouldn't exist".

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I mean, they are literal unskippable cutscenes, albeit ones you can't even walk out on and leave to their own devices. So, you're against them, but also not against them?

 

(they are a blight on gaming, as far as I'm concerned. Yet another crime against humanity that Half-Life inflicted on us)

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Lot of great examples of games that pee you off with forced cut scenes. Farcry series is a big annoyance to me. Once I've played a part and died I shouldn't need to see the cut again.

 

Wonder if there are any devs on here who can tell us why its so prevalent? I always thought it was arrogant to firce people to watch the cut scene you laboured over and spunked money on celeb voices. Sort of like wannabe Spielbergs.

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1 hour ago, Wiper said:

I mean, they are literal unskippable cutscenes, albeit ones you can't even walk out on and leave to their own devices.

 

They're mildly participatory rather than a passive video. I take your point but I reject it - done well they're as valid a form of gameplay as pressing buttons to make the bad man fall over. 

 

A standard video cutscene is usually found between the gameplay, rather than forming part of it. Except for those FMV games from the mid nineties, I suppose.

 

You could call for the option to skip the playable quiet bits but I'd advocate just playing something you like instead. 

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The sinking feeling that sets in the first time a new game pulls that forced-walking crap on you... :facepalm:

 

In the likes of The Walking Dead they were tastefully-applied interaction, in other games they're 100% the new way to do unskippable cutscenes without technically being unskippable cutscenes, and should at the very least have an auto-play option if you're going to be forced to endure them.

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Thought of another one: Max Payne 3!

 

Speedrunners now use fan-made mods for the Steam version that let you skip the cutscenes, but that didn't help me when I was playing it on the Xbox 360 in 2013. :hmm:

 

It's bad enough that they put unskippable mid-level cutscenes in a game that's intended to be highly replayable for score/time attacking. (e.g. the one in Chapter 2, that lasts from 3:20 to 4:45 in a level run that's only 9 minutes long.)

 

And IIRC. if you start a new game on a higher difficulty, most (possibly all?) of the the opening 9:15 cutscene is unskippable:

 

 

 

Dear Rockstar: if the player is choosing to play on a harder difficulty, it's a safe bet that they've already seen the intro once and would like to skip it!

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1 hour ago, Fry Crayola said:

 

They're mildly participatory rather than a passive video. I take your point but I reject it - done well they're as valid a form of gameplay as pressing buttons to make the bad man fall over. 

 

A standard video cutscene is usually found between the gameplay, rather than forming part of it. Except for those FMV games from the mid nineties, I suppose.

 

You could call for the option to skip the playable quiet bits but I'd advocate just playing something you like instead. 

 

Re: your latter point, I generally do; it's just a bit aggravating when they dot a game I otherwise like (or, per the topic, drag out its opening - see e.g. The Phantom Pain).

 

I don't actually mind them as a concept as long as they're a) both engagingly written and part of a game which is primarily narrative-driven, or at least b) skippable, but the latter is basically non-existant as far as I can see. Why the fact that the player being able to make button presses must negate the option to skip said sequences I do not know.

 

I mean, I love walking sims, and a lot of them/many parts of them could be described as interactive cutscenes. But, well, that's the point of the said games. By contrast, I don't think any Gears of War has been elevated by its interminable, unskippable walk-and-talk-in-a-macho-fashion segments.

 

Games with significant branching dialogue sections could be seen in a similar light — lengthy not-quite-cutscenes in what are frequently action-packed games — and they perhaps show a more player-friendly approach: despite demanding significantly more engagement from the player they typically allow you to skip through the dialogue, and in rare cases (e.g. Mass Effect 3) even allow you to automate the decision-making to allow the player to just watch the dialogue play out. Given decision-making is rather more impactful on the game than "press forward to talk/run away/do 'platforming'", it seems crazy to me that we've had non-interactive options appear in that game mechanic before its addition to the interactive cutscene.

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Yeah, I'm seeing where you're coming from now. A distinction could be made between examples where the experience is an important part of what the game is trying to convey (walking simulators, horror games, etc.) and those where it's just replacing what used to be a static cutscene where two characters spout expository dialogue at each other.

 

I don't think I can logically form an argument against skipping the latter and also hold the opinion that you should be able to skip a pre-rendered scene.

 

Nor can I see any downside to providing more user-friendly options to skip sequences, gameplay or not. I'd be at risk of becoming that "no, you're not having the right sort of fun!" guy.

 

Again.

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To add to that, an example of my potential hypocrisy while also perhaps fitting the thread theme.

 

I've long thought it would be excellent for the career modes of sports games to have options for the game to skip over part or all of matches that, to be frank, you're going to win. I'd envisage it simulating the game against weaker opposition and then dropping you in if it's not going to plan, so you could rescue the situation and have a more interesting experience to boot.

 

Effectively a "skip this gameplay, there aren't any stakes yet" approach.

 

You could condense a 50-game season down to a smaller number of defining games and periods, and in turn avoid the grind fatigue that I find turns me off after a couple of seasons.

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On 03/06/2021 at 10:43, Stopharage said:

Red Dead Redemption. Plus every bloody mission involves meet some NPC. Get on horseback and witter away about stuff. Get to a place and shoot some stuff. Back on horse. Witter away. Shoot some more stuff. Complete mission. Get on horse. Witter away. Someones the gallup button works. Sometimes it doesn’t. 


Yup, I never got out of the snowy bit at the start before sacking it off. Too much bollocks, not enough gameplay.

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Forzas - both flavours - are a little guilty of this. Horizon especially. Motorsport will always start you off with a race that achieves essentially nothing, Horizon will have the pointless story before you actually get to start the game proper. 

 

You could also say the PS1 & PS2 Gran Turismo games. "want to do that racing thing you bought the game for? Here's a bunch of hoops to jump through for an hour or so first" 

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Days Gone: I can skip the cutscenes, but hell this opening is a tedious failure to hide the tutorial.

follow the motorbike in front, wander down this tightly defined path, don’t forget to loot cars with alarms going off, don’t forget to loot police cars, etc.

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On 03/06/2021 at 08:48, dumpster said:

So, what games do you avoid playing because they take too long to get started?


Super Bomberman R Online. 20 minutes to start the game after the game has actually done all the loading.

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I've been thinking for a while now that, in the options for every game, as well as options to invert y and disable vibration, there should be a "cut the crap" option. First game to do this should get a Nobull Prize.

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I don't mind a long intro on a first run, but there are some games that lend themselves to multiple runs where this can get really tedious. Skyrim was one of those, forcing you through several minutes where you can't interact at all, before leading you through a story event that probably has no bearing whatsoever on your new character's trip to the thieves guild or whatever. The alternate start DLC was a godsend, and should probably just be a built in option in future games in the series.

 

No Man's Sky isn't so bad, and the intro is kind of handy as a way to introduce some of the changes that were probably made, but it would be nice to just have a "start with a fully functional ship" option that skips the basics.

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13 minutes ago, Made of Ghosts said:

Can we agree that the Half-Life tram ride is actually great though? I usually hate stuff like that, but I’ve replayed the game many times and never ever wanted to skip it. 

 No, because it's not. 

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