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The Green Knight - Dev Patel, Joel Edgerton


Captain Kelsten
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Also, what's depicted in the film is essentially the same story. It does not matter whether Gawain is sent off home by the Green Knight after he removes the belt. He has already had his moral revelation, and is willing to accept death either way. Whether he lives or dies from that point doesn't matter for the story as his has essentially come to an end.

 

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2 minutes ago, Sidewaysbob said:

There was no redemption, which is supposed to be the point of the story.

 

Spoiler

That's not the case at the end at all, unless for redemption you think it has to mean living. He was redeemed after his vision of what might have been, and chose to remove the belt and accept his fate rather than run from it. He was morally redeemed and whether he literally lives or dies doesn't matter for that, or whether the Green Knight lets him go.

 

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22 minutes ago, Sidewaysbob said:

Bearing in mind that the Arthurian legends are a mish mash of old legends and folklore so there isn't really a definitive story.

 

Also, this is why it's a strange criticism even if the ending is changed, because it's not even a fixed story anyway, so why does it matter if it's interpreted slightly differently? There is no definitive text that it has to follow.

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Just now, Benny said:

 

Also, this is why it's a strange criticism even if the ending is changed, because it's not even a fixed story anyway, so why does it matter if it's interpreted slightly differently? There is no definitive text that it has to follow.

 

That's very true, but they all end with

Spoiler

Gwain going back to tell of his deeds and be made a knight. I thought this ending was left too open ended.

 

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Personally I think ambiguity is perfectly fine, it's crediting the viewer with the desire to have their own ideas of what it means which is great. Given you had a similar reaction to ambiguity at the end of Whiplash it seems that might be where this particular subjectivity is coming from though. No bad thing, but makes it more clear why that may be your reaction to this as well.

 

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11 minutes ago, Sidewaysbob said:
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But its left too ambiguous. He has the vision of his future, then takes the belt off.  Its not clear if he has learnt that not telling the knight about the belt changed him, or the thought of being king did. 

 

 

 

I didn't get that at all. I thought the ending was failry clear.  

Spoiler

His vision showed a future of which he wished to have no part of. By taking the belt off that protected him, he showed the Green Knight he wasn't affriad to meet his end, hense the "well done" from the Green Knight. I think it's implied the Knight knew about the belt.

 

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5 hours ago, DeciderVT said:

On reading about the original story:

 

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It seems that the Lord was the Green Knight all along, so he would've known about the belt. I noticed that Edgerton's eyes looked very green in one scene at the table, as well.

 

 

Oh I fully think the Green Knight knows everything, setting it all up and manipulating stuff to test him.

 

Spoiler

The Fox is the eyes and ears of the Green Knight and one of the last tests was the Fox trying to stop him crossing the stream. 

 

The Lord knows about him and his deeds. How would he? 

 

The Lady looks like Essel (obviously both played by Vikander).

 

There's even a line about how he's already in the Chappel when he's attacked early on. I think that's meant to be taken litreally rather than them moking him.

 

It's all one big test

 

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Also, another thing I wondered early on:

 

Spoiler

After being robbed and bound, the flash of a rotting skeleton after could be interpreted as him thinking what might happen then getting determination to escape, but one way I liked to interpret it is that he maybe died under the tree, and all subsequent events are spiritual tests for him after his death. At the end he wouldn't be able to "go back" anyway as he's already dead. Until he accepts his fate he cannot achieve redemption and pass on.

 

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11 minutes ago, Benny said:

Also, another thing I wondered early on:

 

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After being robbed and bound, the flash of a rotting skeleton after could be interpreted as him thinking what might happen then getting determination to escape, but one way I liked to interpret it is that he maybe died under the tree, and all subsequent events are spiritual tests for him after his death. At the end he wouldn't be able to "go back" anyway as he's already dead. Until he accepts his fate he cannot achieve redemption and pass on.

 

 

I'd also thought something simular. I love that it's so open to these interpretations.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Forgot what date it was and this was  on Prime in Oz from yesterday, went straight on as I've been looking forward to seeing it since the trailer. Wasn't disappointed , I thought it was wonderful and for me there was a pervasive sense of dread throughout as Sir Gawain  takes his journey. The items that people have discussed as being open to interpretation are exactly that , I've interpreted some of the things a specific way but can totally understand how other interpretations have been arrived at and appreciate them, it's cool that there are multiple ways of seeing it and people have taken different things away.

 

 

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  • 1 month later...
On 25/09/2021 at 08:55, Sidewaysbob said:

Maybe I wasn't in the right frame of mind. But I found it slow, plodding, tedious, pretentious, visually stunning, well acted, boring and pointless. 

 

As for the giants, I was expecting more. 

 

And the fox in ghost of tsushima had more personality. 

 

The end was quite good, but there's a lot of slog to get there. 

 

 

75e582cedfe1a7088a1474b4afd0ea2e9a-01-monty-python-holy-grail.rsocial.w1200.jpg


Watched this tonight, came here to post thoughts and found this summed up my thoughts perfectly. 
 

Tedious and ponderous are the best words. But yes, clearly very well made and pretty. It didn’t hold my attention at any point. I struggled to get through it all. 
 

Best bit was the ending…

 

Spoiler

When you realise the last 20 minutes has been a vision and he’s completed his journey to gain courage. 


*Wizardofoz Scarecrow.jpg*

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Its the best film I've seen this year, although there's plenty of movies came out this year I've not watched. I love slow, fatalistic magic realist bullshit though. Everything's set out in the trailer as far as tone and subject are concerned so I'm shocked - shocked I say - that people are reporting manfully struggling through it.

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I actually thought the trailer really mis-sold it as some sort of Lord of the Rings style fantasy adventure romp. (cue all the fantasy and sci-fi YouTube geek channels covering it who would only usually be doing Marvel films for example, when of course it's much closer to an existential journey like The Lighthouse or something. Which of course those reviewers would never be going near because it doesn't have magical foxes in it.)

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