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Eurogamer launches paid work experience programme for ethnic minorities


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I'd very much like to have more diverse voices involved in games, if only to shake things up a bit at the very least. 

 

When the initial Gamergate stuff happened I hoped it would highlight how stale and insular a lot of games journalism had become on sites like Kotaku. Mind you it very quickly turned into the misogynist shit-show we all know and any hope for a decent look into diversity went out the window. 

 

Wouldn't be at all surprised if similar voices of rage shouting "leave our games alone!" are heard from those who rabidly fear change and can't stand the idea that someone who isn't like them (young, white male heterosexual) has any input into games, be that development, design or reporting. 

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27 minutes ago, Vimster said:

When the initial Gamergate stuff happened I hoped it would highlight how stale and insular a lot of games journalism had become on sites like Kotaku. Mind you it very quickly turned into the misogynist shit-show we all know and any hope for a decent look into diversity went out the window. 


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42 minutes ago, Vimster said:

Wouldn't be at all surprised if similar voices of rage shouting "leave our games alone!" are heard from those who rabidly fear change and can't stand the idea that someone who isn't like them (young, white male heterosexual) has any input into games, be that development, design or reporting. 

 

Thing is, if they're any good there will be zero disadvantage to them caused by schemes like this.

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It’s a good start - seems like a decent pay-rate, too.

 

Some websites desperately need some new people. Such as Giant Bomb, which had some staff leave and is now back to middle-aged white men. The temporary replacement on their podcast is... another middle-aged white man.

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16 minutes ago, Alex W. said:


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Yeah call me naive but I genuinely believed right at the start there could have been a wider discussion about diversity in games journalism, obviously not factoring in how totally shite a lot of "discussion" is on the internet.  Never again. 

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26 minutes ago, Vimster said:

Yeah call me naive but I genuinely believed right at the start there could have been a wider discussion about diversity in games journalism, obviously not factoring in how totally shite a lot of "discussion" is on the internet.  Never again. 


It started with a guy shopping his feature-article-length screed against his indie game developer ex and her game journalist ex around every available games community until he was banned from all of them except 4chan. I really don’t know why you think it descended into misogyny.

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1 hour ago, Vimster said:

When the initial Gamergate stuff happened I hoped it would highlight how stale and insular a lot of games journalism had become on sites like Kotaku. Mind you it very quickly turned into the misogynist shit-show we all know and any hope for a decent look into diversity went out the window. 

 

It can't be stated enough.

 

As Alex says - it started as a misogynist shit-show, 4chan then tried to put a veneer of it's not a misogynist/anti-diversity shitshow by coopting the word "ethics" to mean the opposite of what it means, and it continued to be a only-white-males-should-do-journalism-and-preferably-on-youtube shit show for years (and continues to be so to this day).

 

We can't let any rewrite of history pretend that it was a campaign that, at any point, was something other than a QAnon prototype.

 

 

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They didn't even get to "ethics" the smart way, it started off with them trying to throw any shit they could at any site that mentioned the harassment they were directing at Quinn. Retconning it in to a "journalistic ethics" crusade came later.

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2 hours ago, K said:

The comments on that article are full of people who have suddenly become experts in UK employment law and the 2010 Equality Act.

The same experts who insisted that businesses making them wear a mask were breaching the equality act. 

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I'm a bit wary as when surveys are done in media the vast majority of journalists are wealthy from Oxbridge and private education. 

 

Schemes like this do risk overlooking white working class who have the worst educational attainment alongside people of Pakistani and Black Caribbean origin.

 

A measure such as those from state schools or free school meals for these projects in journalism (or other areas where while middle/upper class dominate such as law and politics) would sit better with me.

 

There's a lot of cases where races are lumped together despite vast variation within. For example, "Asian" when people of Indian and Chinese decent are far more successful than Bangladeshi and Pakistani. There's massive gaps between white working class and middle class. Within black communities, a big gap exists between Black African and Black Caribbean.

 

Race alone is very simplistic. Good article from the guardian here: https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/media/media-blog/2018/apr/29/journalism-class-private-education

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8 minutes ago, SF-02 said:

I'm a bit wary as when surveys are done in media the vast majority of journalists are wealthy from Oxbridge and private education. 

 

Schemes like this do risk overlooking white working class who have the worst educational attainment alongside people of Pakistani and Black Caribbean origin.

 

A measure such as those from state schools or free school meals for these projects in journalism (or other areas where while middle/upper class dominate such as law and politics) would sit better with me.

 

There's a lot of cases where races are lumped together despite vast variation within. For example, "Asian" when people of Indian and Chinese decent are far more successful than Bangladeshi and Pakistani. There's massive gaps between white working class and middle class. Within black communities, a big gap exists between Black African and Black Caribbean.

 

Race alone is very simplistic.

 

While (as an estranged working class lad) I'd love to see more support based on other metrics, I think you're overlooking the impact of visibility. Educational aptitude is one thing, but never seeing 'yourself' occupying a position in life is both a psychic and physical barrier to attainment.

 

Any approach that promotes visibility is a good thing. I would have loved to have known that I 'could' in amongst so much professional strife, and seeing someone I could relate to, already there, would have been massive.

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32 minutes ago, SF-02 said:

I'm a bit wary as when surveys are done in media the vast majority of journalists are wealthy from Oxbridge and private education. 

 

Schemes like this do risk overlooking white working class who have the worst educational attainment alongside people of Pakistani and Black Caribbean origin.

 

A measure such as those from state schools or free school meals for these projects in journalism (or other areas where while middle/upper class dominate such as law and politics) would sit better with me.

 

There's a lot of cases where races are lumped together despite vast variation within. For example, "Asian" when people of Indian and Chinese decent are far more successful than Bangladeshi and Pakistani. There's massive gaps between white working class and middle class. Within black communities, a big gap exists between Black African and Black Caribbean.

 

Race alone is very simplistic. Good article from the guardian here: https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/media/media-blog/2018/apr/29/journalism-class-private-education


this might be the case in the media more generally, but the U.K. games press is historically not private school white: but is astonishingly white. 

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21 minutes ago, Chadruharazzeb said:

If EG hadn't only hired white people to start with they wouldn't need to do this. 

Yeah: there was an article by them last year amongst the black live matters stuff where they mea culpaed the fact they rarely, if ever, published any articles by any ethnic minority freelancers - let alone have them on staff.

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3 hours ago, SF-02 said:

I'm a bit wary as when surveys are done in media the vast majority of journalists are wealthy from Oxbridge and private education. 

 

Schemes like this do risk overlooking white working class who have the worst educational attainment alongside people of Pakistani and Black Caribbean origin.

 

A measure such as those from state schools or free school meals for these projects in journalism (or other areas where while middle/upper class dominate such as law and politics) would sit better with me.

 

There's a lot of cases where races are lumped together despite vast variation within. For example, "Asian" when people of Indian and Chinese decent are far more successful than Bangladeshi and Pakistani. There's massive gaps between white working class and middle class. Within black communities, a big gap exists between Black African and Black Caribbean.

 

Race alone is very simplistic. Good article from the guardian here: https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/media/media-blog/2018/apr/29/journalism-class-private-education


As someone else said visibility is a massive thing.

However you’re right. I work in the media and a huge proportion of my colleagues are privately educated and had parents who could afford to support them as they started a career that is notoriously low paid at the start.

Working class people are petty much blocked from entering the media no matter their race. Fix that and the industry will fix its racial diversity problem at the same time.

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2 hours ago, Rex Grossman said:

Working class people are petty much blocked from entering the media no matter their race. Fix that and the industry will fix its racial diversity problem at the same time.

I wish I could believe that but I think unconscious racial bias would still play too big a part in recruitment. Would love to wrong though.

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One of the best games journalists the UK ever produced was Mr T from Digitiser; this guy taught me a great deal about the value of messing with bins. Don't think Mr Biffo paid him though, might class as slavery.

 

True story right but I have the same accent as Maggie from Transformers, slightly more legit claim since her voice sounds like Clacton beach in Essex, which is obscure -- this voice is way annoying for technical language like 'ten billion floating point triangles per second', and starts to hurt after a while of nerdcoring mates, hence the use of web forums, but at meets didn't speak much and like to listen. Is beach bum an ethnic minority?

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7 hours ago, Gabe said:

I wish I could believe that but I think unconscious racial bias would still play too big a part in recruitment. Would love to wrong though.

I think many employers in the industry are cottoning on to the unconscious bias but are still only employing minority applicants who fit a certain criteria.

Basically if you don’t welcome working class candidates you will exclude a higher proportion of minority candidates because they are disproportionately represented in lower income brackets.

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