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2 hours ago, Strafe said:

Counterpoint - if you pay for the game you’ll be more invested and probably play it more. If it’s disposable you’ll likely give up pretty quickly.

 

I agree with that. I wasn't saying this game isn't good. But I am saying it's not for everyone and therefore a good choice for gamepass, as you might end up not liking it at all.

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How does this compare to Sekiro in terms of impenetrability? I quite like the idea of playing what is essentially a Jet Li film, but the reviews and the general vibe of unforgiving savagery mean I’m a bit cautious. 

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38 minutes ago, K said:

How does this compare to Sekiro in terms of impenetrability? I quite like the idea of playing what is essentially a Jet Li film, but the reviews and the general vibe of unforgiving savagery mean I’m a bit cautious. 

 

I am finding it absolutely nails, but I am struggling with whether to parry or dodge. I just cannot seem to get it down, but occasionally some madness happens and it's pure magic! 

 

I think it's harder than Sekiro for me! 

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1 hour ago, K said:

How does this compare to Sekiro in terms of impenetrability? I quite like the idea of playing what is essentially a Jet Li film, but the reviews and the general vibe of unforgiving savagery mean I’m a bit cautious. 

I'm about to give up on the game, which is far sooner than I gave up on Sekiro. For me there's just too much inconsistency with the parrying, and how enemies sometimes seem to block everything you try, but it's almost certainly me that's the problem. I can imagine someone really mastering this and doing amazing playthroughs, but that person ain't me.

 

Edit: Do I regret buying it? Yes.

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1 hour ago, K said:

How does this compare to Sekiro in terms of impenetrability? I quite like the idea of playing what is essentially a Jet Li film, but the reviews and the general vibe of unforgiving savagery mean I’m a bit cautious. 


Its more straightforward as a game, you’ll always know where to go and what do to.

 

The block/parry system is more complicated in that it requires you to block high and low as well as the expected non block-able grabs.

 

Theres a posture bar for you and enemies that’s in the same vein though crucially, an enemies posture bar stays worn down whilst yours recovers (allbeit very slowly).

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2 minutes ago, Strafe said:

an enemies posture bar stays worn down whilst yours recovers

Depends on the enemy. I've seen enemies in The Club that then their posture fairly quickly if you're not careful. What annoys me is when you have multiple enemies and you try to do multiple moves on just one enemy, the game would often attempt the second move against a different enemy instead of the one I was just attacking. Quite maddening.

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1 hour ago, Thor said:

Depends on the enemy. I've seen enemies in The Club that then their posture fairly quickly if you're not careful.


I haven’t seen that. There’s a couple that have two health bars (and two posture bars) but I haven’t noticed anyone regenerating posture.

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1 hour ago, Nate Dogg III said:

Oh, and I reviewed this for The Guardian

 

Quote

However, when you finally beat the first boss, the chances are you’ll be pretty old. (I was in my late 60s after a solid day’s punishment.) 

 

Really?! I was 30! Considering your fighting game chops I'm surprised! ;)

 

It's an unusual-feeling game, for sure, it's really hard to read what's going on, but that's ok for now as I've only just started.  The unblockable attacks aren't quite as hard to anticipate as I'd feared from Shillups' review, the orangey glow is quite blatant. 

 

The soundtrack is great, btw, not many people have mentioned that yet.  Nice atmosphere while mooching about the place in between fights.  Looks amazing too, very solid and the lighting is beautiful.   

 

Debating whether to push on with level 2 or just retry the first stage!  Think I'm just going to stick to first stage for now. 

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I've beaten level 1 age 21 (ingame that is, in real life I'm 44). Gonna take a shot at the second boss tomorrow. Was really close earlier and I now seem to have the ducking and dodging down. The hardest part of the club for me is that bald asshole prior to the boss.

 

I think the game definitely rewards more patient, defensive play, at least against harder enemies. The second level really teaches you how to play this. The L1 dodging and ducking (and jumping, but I find that one harder to do for some reason) is a great tool for wearing opponents down and creating openings. The parry is good too, but riskier.

 

The R2 dodge should only be used to create distance imo. And unlock the environmental skill as quickly as possible. It's one of the best tools against multiple opponents.

 

Great game this.

 

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16 hours ago, mikeyl said:

Also, can seeing what @Wiper is getting at, whilst not cultural appropriation it’s a form of cultural approximation (cultural tourism?) which could have probably been thought through better. Imagine if Black Panther was made by an all white crew. Beds would’ve been shat on.

 

I was watching gameplay footage earlier and my wife almost immediately identified it as the work of a load of white people. Hardly offensive, but clumsy and 'off' in a thousand tiny ways while trying to present itself as authentic.

 The defensive 'waaaaaah, stop ruining my fun' responses to Wiper's initial posts are an embarrassment to the forum, though. You know something's gone wrong when Resetera are having a fairly calm, informed discussion while the resident arseholes of RLLMUK are making Wiper feel he has to hide his thoughts in spoilers.

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5 hours ago, Quest said:

 

I was watching gameplay footage earlier and my wife almost immediately identified it as the work of a load of white people. Hardly offensive, but clumsy and 'off' in a thousand tiny ways while trying to present itself as authentic.

 The defensive 'waaaaaah, stop ruining my fun' responses to Wiper's initial posts are an embarrassment to the forum, though. You know something's gone wrong when Resetera are having a fairly calm, informed discussion while the resident arseholes of RLLMUK are making Wiper feel he has to hide his thoughts in spoilers.


As usual, the truth of the matter is somewhere in-between the 2 positions:

Quote

 

“Our intention is to make something that is as authentic and respectful of Chinese kung fu culture as possible,” Tarno said. “Although we’ve got one concept artist on the team who’s of Chinese culture and descent, [who] was that first layer of how to get certain texts and details of the environment, right. But that was not enough for us. We wanted to go deeper.”

To do that, Sloclap engaged others of Asian descent, including Anlu Liu of Kowloon Nights, a video game investment fund, and Richie Zhu of Kepler Interactive, Sloclap’s publishing partner. “Throughout the entire development of Sifu, we have constantly played builds and provided feedback,” Liu told The Verge. 

Both consulted on a number of issues related to gameplay and cultural elements, like correcting the order of characters on the coin talisman that holds your resurrection power. For the game’s pending Chinese localization, they helped select the Chinese voice actors and sat in on recording sessions to ensure the dialogue was representative of how Chinese people speak to each other. Liu and Zhu were also responsible for connecting Sloclap with consultants in China who provided feedback on everything down to the smallest detail. There’s an anecdote both Tarno and Liu shared about washing machines in the background of the game’s first level being swapped from front loading to top loading since the latter is the kind most Chinese would be familiar with.

 

https://www.theverge.com/22920754/sifu-review-pc-ps5-sloclap

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Yeah, I'm aware they had people consult, but I think there's a difference between building something from the ground up with that perspective and having someone come in to oversee localisation and fix up a few errors.

 

Note that I don't think Sifu shouldn't have been made -  merely that its flaws are worthy of discussion without people flying off the handle about censorship for some reason. 

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The haptics in this game are pretty good, especially combined with the 3D audio.

 

As an example, when a door shuts behind you, you’ll hear it slam and ‘feel’ it slam near the bottom of the duel sense. Other haptics feels like they’re coming in from different directions, too. It’s quite cool.

 

pro tip: you can turn the haptic strength up in the options menu. 

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Anyone care to guess when this might unlock via the Epic store. 

 

Reason is that because it's on pre-order status at the moment, those wankers won't let me use my £8 off coupon, and I'm kind of hoping that when it's fully available the thing should work. 

 

 

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28 minutes ago, Quest said:

Yeah, I'm aware they had people consult, but I think there's a difference between building something from the ground up with that perspective and having someone come in to oversee localisation and fix up a few errors.

 

 

Except:

Quote

"Throughout the entire development of Sifu, we have constantly played builds and provided feedback,” Liu told The Verge. 

 

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20 minutes ago, Eighthours said:

 

Except:

 

You can’t quote that article without quoting this but tho 

 

However, the criticisms others have for the game cannot and should not be written off because, essentially, “Some Chinese people gave it a thumbs up.”

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I've always liked more challenging games, not because I'm some gamer god because that couldn't be further from the truth, but because they demand a certain focus. I tend to lose my attention with games that are a walk in the park. This really got its hooks in me. Definitely one of those 'one more go' type of games.

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11 hours ago, robdood said:

 

 

Really?! I was 30! Considering your fighting game chops I'm surprised! ;)

 

It's an unusual-feeling game, for sure, it's really hard to read what's going on, but that's ok for now as I've only just started.  The unblockable attacks aren't quite as hard to anticipate as I'd feared from Shillups' review, the orangey glow is quite blatant. 

 

The soundtrack is great, btw, not many people have mentioned that yet.  Nice atmosphere while mooching about the place in between fights.  Looks amazing too, very solid and the lighting is beautiful.   

 

Debating whether to push on with level 2 or just retry the first stage!  Think I'm just going to stick to first stage for now. 


They patched the first boss a few days before release to make it easier ACTUALLY 

 

 

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14 minutes ago, mikeyl said:

You can’t quote that article without quoting this but tho 

 

However, the criticisms others have for the game cannot and should not be written off because, essentially, “Some Chinese people gave it a thumbs up.”

 

Oh, totally. As I said, the truth is in-between the positions. I think some of the criticism reads as if the devs didn't do anything with regards to Chinese culture and are just a bunch of white men playing Chinese dress-up. I think that's over the top, and that some people (not here, thankfully) have been jumping on the making-assumptions-for-internet-points bandwagon without bothering to look into the matter. Feedback about mistakes, sloppiness and the general approach is fair enough, but the devs did at least try to be authentic to the culture, even if they didn't do enough for some gamers.

 

I'm quite interested in how the game plays. There was a clip posted of the level that looks like the Oldboy corridor fight and people were marvelling at it. I didn't agree - I thought it looked really stop-start and absolutely nothing like as smooth as the Oldboy scene. Videogames still have a long way to go to match this stuff, I reckon. Maybe Sifu is the beginning of something in that regard. Anyway, hopefully I'll get to play it at some point. I doubt I'll buy it at full price with so much coming out over the next few weeks, but maybe when it's on sale.

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It feels a bit unfair to frame it as criticism when they have clearly made the game because they love Chinese films so much. Like, the development team spent years of their lives on this game. It's not like they were casting around for things to stick in their game, and decided to have some Chinese characters in there as well. Obviously, it's not going to be accurate in all respects because the developers are not from China, but this is nothing but a tribute to Chinese culture, surely? If there inaccuracies, fair enough for pointing them out, but unless they're offensively wrong, it seems a bit harsh to cast this as a failure on Sloclap's part. 

 

Obviously, you've got to be careful when depicting other cultures, but they seem to be coming from a good place. I think personally, I would be more interested if it was a game with the style and setup of a Chinese action film but set in France, because I think it's fascinating when you take that kind of setup and transplant it into a different setting - you get the big genre moves, but also a bit more authenticity. But I don't think there's anything wrong with what Sloclap have done (that I've seen, anyway).

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French developer gets stick for not respecting chinese culture enough meanwhile the chinese are adding their own state approved endings to western movies.  🙄

 

Hot take aside you can see this was made with love and care with a deep appreciation for martial arts movies. As long as there's nothing intentionally there to offend or cause damage to a particular group then I don't see the problem. 

 

Dotemu didn't get any grief for the Chinese influences in Streets of Rage 4 so I don't see why it should be any different here.

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14 minutes ago, K said:

I think personally, I would be more interested if it was a game with the style and setup of a Chinese action film but set in France, because I think it's fascinating when you take that kind of setup and transplant it into a different setting - you get the big genre moves, but also a bit more authenticity. 


Yes! Like John Wick or Judge Dredd. 
 

Also, did Sleeping Dogs catch any of this kinda shit? Maybe not but I remember it being quite authentic, dotted with irrelevant minutiae and local cantohiphop soundtracks.

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2 minutes ago, milko said:

Remember when games had demos? I'd love to give this a go but it's like 95% sure it'll be too hard for me, I've never been much of a fighting game player.

Don't buy it.

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My god I don't want this to spiral into an offtopic discussion, but MATE:

 

23 minutes ago, Down by Law said:

French developer gets stick for not respecting chinese culture enough meanwhile the chinese are adding their own state approved endings to western movies.  

This is a strawman. 

 

And: 

25 minutes ago, Down by Law said:

As long as there's nothing intentionally there to offend or cause damage to a particular group then I don't see the problem

When did you post this from? 2010?  'Hot takes aside' indeed, lol. 

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