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Anybody who watches a lot of food shows on tv or YouTube gets familiar with ingredients turning up with increasing frequency - often starting on things like Great British Menu & Masterchef before becoming more mainstream.

 

Thought it may be an idea to have a thread discussing real world tastings of these things - which I almost always find horrible.

 

GBM and a recent Rick Stein in Cornwall featured Sea Buckthorn, which was used in a dessert in the former and main course sauce by Rick

 

I bought a couple of these from Ocado - it's possibly the tartest sourest natural thing I've ever put in my mouth, it's how I imagine those rock hard little berries birds eat (which your parents said were poison) must taste.

 

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I also bought some samphire the other week and cooked up in a little butter as suggested - it was vile, tasted like spinach with added metal filings.

 

Final special mention must go to Celeriac, which is quite common now but still much loved on poncey chef shows, again I'm not sure why when mash potato is so much better.

 

I do live in hope though and will keep trying these food trends as will be nice to be on the right side of one and find something great.

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21 minutes ago, The Hierophant said:

Also techniques. There are far too many foams and split sauces. 

 

Instagram food - see also burgers that are too big to fit in your mouth and come held together by giant sticks with a split donut instead of a bun.

 

I do like to try these things though as every now and then a gem gets thru, to balance up my OP negativity I'll put korean gochujang into the mix, it's not really an emerging trend now but also isn't fully established and next to the ketchup in Sainsbury yet. It's an incredible paste that just infuses whatever you cook using it with a level of spicy savoury flavour that feels like cheating its so easy to achieve.

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Lao Gan Ma Chilli Crisp (with or without peanuts).

 

c2ec635d-e732-4668-a501-a227f47d2508--2019-0430_lao-gan-ma-chili-crisp_3x2_ty-mecham_001.thumb.jpg.7c124f53ff57865b93f55422d2153970.jpg

 

https://www.theguardian.com/food/2021/jan/17/what-will-be-eating-in-2021-and-how-do-food-trends-happen-kimchi-teff-lao-gan-ma

Quote

 

3. Lao Gan Ma

Tweet about Lao Gan Ma, as OFM did while writing this piece, and in the US and UK you know exactly who will respond: chefs, PRs, food writers, bartenders, deli-owners – foodie hipsters, basically, among whom this crispy chilli oil inspires evangelical fervour. “The sriracha years were John the Baptist compared to the coming of the One True Condiment,” replied Richard Storer, chef at Sheffield’s Rutland Arms. Such praise is common for this deeply savoury mix of fried onions and roasted Guizhou chillies, which in China has made Guiyang Nanming Laoganma Special Flavour Foodstuffs Co Ltd a household name, despite not advertising until recently. The company’s owner, Tao Huabi, started out running a noodle stall before her sauce proved a runaway hit. Nicknamed “old godmother” (lao gan ma) by her student regulars, Huabi – whose impassive face stares out from every jar – began to make the sauce commercially in the mid-1990s. By 2015, this once word-of-mouth sensation was selling so well Forbes was calculating the now 73-year-old’s wealth at $1.05bn.

 

Exported worldwide, Lao Gan Ma’s fame continues to grow on recommendation. Its products are in “very high double-digit growth”, says Paul Michalski, the managing director of Lao Gan Ma’s European distributor, Liroy BV, largely down to rising numbers of Chinese students in Europe who are turning non-Chinese friends onto this magic potion.

In the US, Lao Gan Ma has seen a similar surge in popularity. In May 2020, Eater hailed a wave of chef-made chilli oils, many inspired by Lao Gan Ma and the social media heat around what Lucky Peach described as a “pantry staple”. There is even a US Lao Gan Ma fanzine.

 

“It’s delicious on practically anything,” says the Chinese food expert, Fuchsia Dunlop, “so I’m not surprised at its almost universal appeal. What is surprising is a relish with Chinese packaging catching on to this extent. I can’t think of another example.”

Nor one that has created such a vocal street team. “True fans spread the word,” says Brian Yip, a director at the supermarket Wing Yip. “One Cricklewood colleague, from Guizhou, tells everyone they should use it.” Or as Alex Rushmer, chef at Cambridge’s Vanderlyle, drooled on Twitter: “I would eat a bowl of gravel smothered in Lao Gan Ma."

 

 

 

Fortunately this one lives up to the hype and is now added to the staples like Sriracha and Gochujang in my larder.

 

 

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Sea Buckthorn is great, I had it in a cocktail and a sorbet at Ginfest a few years ago and ended up buying a few bottles of juice from a tiny provider in Scotland but I never got through it all as I wasn't sure what to do with it.

 

A big trend that's been driven by Tik Tok and Youtube is the 15hr potato. Basically confit thin slices of potato in olive oil and then press them into a loaf tin and leave it in the fridge overnight. Slice it into cubes and deep fry so you get this crunchy, multi-layered potato.

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19 minutes ago, Gaz said:

A big trend that's been driven by Tik Tok and Youtube is the 15hr potato. Basically confit thin slices of potato in olive oil and then press them into a loaf tin and leave it in the fridge overnight. Slice it into cubes and deep fry so you get this crunchy, multi-layered potato.

 

I think I saw somebody do that in duck fat on some show and it looked utterly amazing

 

https://cookbookreview.blog/2019/12/06/quality-chop-houses-famous-confit-potatoes-by-shaun-searley/

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2 hours ago, Davros sock drawer said:

Lao Gan Ma Chilli Crisp (with or without peanuts).

 

c2ec635d-e732-4668-a501-a227f47d2508--2019-0430_lao-gan-ma-chili-crisp_3x2_ty-mecham_001.thumb.jpg.7c124f53ff57865b93f55422d2153970.jpg

 

https://www.theguardian.com/food/2021/jan/17/what-will-be-eating-in-2021-and-how-do-food-trends-happen-kimchi-teff-lao-gan-ma

 

 

Fortunately this one lives up to the hype and is now added to the staples like Sriracha and Gochujang in my larder.

 

 


That sounds amazing and I want a jar. 

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my store cupboard of ingredients scares me, especially the spices/sauces/rubs bit where i have far more stuff than I can ever use

 

just found a jar of this in there - which I think was inspired by serious eats, looks like I bought it on Amazon back in 2018.

 

https://www.seriouseats.com/2018/04/chili-crisp-spicy-salty-crunchy-tingly-and-good-on-everything.html

 

never known what to put it on. 

 

lgm-crispy-chilli-in-oil_720x.jpg?v=1574

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2 hours ago, Gotters said:

my store cupboard of ingredients scares me, especially the spices/sauces/rubs bit where i have far more stuff than I can ever use

 

just found a jar of this in there - which I think was inspired by serious eats, looks like I bought it on Amazon back in 2018.

 

https://www.seriouseats.com/2018/04/chili-crisp-spicy-salty-crunchy-tingly-and-good-on-everything.html

 

never known what to put it on. 

 

lgm-crispy-chilli-in-oil_720x.jpg?v=1574

 

Anything.

 

Rice, eggs, Chinese veg, silken tofu, normal tofu, meat, stir fries, dumplings, congee.

 

I also mix it with any combination of the following: rice wine vinegar, soy, bit of sugar, oyster sauce, hoisin sauce, kecap manis, cornstarch thickened water, etc to make a sauce to cook with.

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3 hours ago, Gotters said:

my store cupboard of ingredients scares me, especially the spices/sauces/rubs bit where i have far more stuff than I can ever use

 

just found a jar of this in there - which I think was inspired by serious eats, looks like I bought it on Amazon back in 2018.

 

https://www.seriouseats.com/2018/04/chili-crisp-spicy-salty-crunchy-tingly-and-good-on-everything.html

 

never known what to put it on. 

 

lgm-crispy-chilli-in-oil_720x.jpg?v=1574

 

I'm struggling to think of anything that I wouldn't put this on

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To continue the Lao Gan Ma love-in, I get jars of their preserved black beans in chilli oil from the world food aisle in Sainsbury's. It's really good. I use it exclusively as the simplest stir-fry flavouring available - a big spoon of this in whatever you're cooking and you're sorted (maybe a dash of soy at the end if it needs a little more). Although I just stumbled across a review that mentioned using the oil to make popcorn, and now I'm intrigued...

_lao.jpg.0ec87762200a72e8dd24ade78ebf223e.jpg

 

 

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Some Sainsbury's sell Kewpie mayonnaise in the world food section. It costs £4.50 which is obviously a lot, but it's delicious. I much prefer the flavour to something like Hellman's, and it's pretty much essential for Japanese dishes like okonomiyaki etc.

 

image.thumb.png.7ef7696232c487c2a5ed97aff4e2a5b4.png

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I got some Kewpie from Sainsburys and it went straight in the bin, something about it I found genuinely disgusting - and I love mayo. Heinz Seriously good is my goto store cupboard choice as rarely make my own. 

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2 minutes ago, Gotters said:

I got some Kewpie from Sainsburys and it went straight in the bin, something about it I found genuinely disgusting - and I love mayo. Heinz Seriously good is my goto store cupboard choice as rarely make my own. 

 

Heathen!

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On 15/02/2021 at 08:48, Gotters said:

Final special mention must go to Celeriac, which is quite common now but still much loved on poncey chef shows, again I'm not sure why when mash potato is so much better.

 

There are two reasons.

 

1) It's a different flavour, it's more like a kind of sauce that goes really well with blue cheese, walnuts, those kinds of things and the distinct celery flavour but isn't horrible like celery is a nice thing with pork. So it's comparing apples to oranges, or indeed, potatoes to celeriac

 

2) It's a LOT less calories than potatoes. When we do low cal / keto / fast days we can eat nearly a whole celeriac and kinda get filled like potato mash would, without the carbs or calories. It serves a purpose.

 

I genuinely like celeriac a lot. But I am not disagreeing with you...it's obviously not better than mashed potatoes. Or any kinds of potatoes. 

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Also I'm another one that puts that crispy chilli oil on basically every single thing I eat. I'm not sure there's a single food that isn't improved with it.

 

Recent obsession is to add it to peanut butter on toast. The salty spicey thing is nice, sort of transforms it into something Thai.

 

Making your own chilli oil is quite fun, as you are just deep frying chillies and can adjust things to taste, more / less garlic / salt / other things. More roasted chilli flavour, more heat so the chillies go cruncher, less heat so it's more paste like. But lately I couldn't be bothered so i'm smashing one of the chinese brands.

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1 hour ago, cowfields said:

Also I'm another one that puts that crispy chilli oil on basically every single thing I eat. I'm not sure there's a single food that isn't improved with it.

 

Recent obsession is to add it to peanut butter on toast. The salty spicey thing is nice, sort of transforms it into something Thai.


 

 

I love Naga pickle on a peanut butter sandwich. 

 

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It's pretty hot. If you want hot hot then Sichuan hot pot base is pretty damn firey.

 

I made a dry pot with Sichuan hot pot base, chili oil and dobunjiang which was pretty fucking hot. Only manageable due to the huge number of Sichuan peppercorns.

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18 hours ago, Morwoo said:

Having got and tried this today, you are hilariously incorrect, it's incredibly spicy.

 

Really? Are we talking about the same product or do you have a low heat tolerance? My girlfriend eats it and she doesn't have a very high heat tolerance. She'll literally put a few dots of sriracha on things when she uses it. For reference I think eating a raw scotch bonnet or Thai chili is incredibly spicy. Tabasco is medium and sriracha is medium-hot. 

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Nuh-uh, it's well hot.  Anyway, I do have quite a low tolerance but all subjective innit, two different comments I got from social media pals about it:

 

"yeah I grew up on hot food and it makes me cough still"

 

and

 

"This isn't spicy, tastes like garlic tbh"

 

On an entirely unrelated note, would anyone like a barely used jar of crispy chilli oil?

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1 hour ago, Morwoo said:

Nuh-uh, it's well hot.  Anyway, I do have quite a low tolerance but all subjective innit, two different comments I got from social media pals about it:

 

"yeah I grew up on hot food and it makes me cough still"

 

and

 

"This isn't spicy, tastes like garlic tbh"

 

On an entirely unrelated note, would anyone like a barely used jar of crispy chilli oil?

 

I've literally just finished my jar...

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