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Games with great HDR. Mark Rothko debates included for free.


JoeK
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1 hour ago, ZOK said:


So the desert should be darker? Sounds spot on! :rolleyes:

 

Interesting example, given that the desert in Cyberpunk is really fucking dark at night, and exists as a contrast to the neon of the city.

 

When I was doing the desert missions at night it was basically pitch black in the junk yard bit except for the light of my headlights.

 

In their terrible bright HDR version everything looks light grey and it's never so dark that you can't see detail in basically everything.

 

Which isn't how the night works.

 

It's like an eternal dusk.

 

But yeah, in general Cyberpunk's visual style pops the most when the black bits are actually black, then you get the full contrast of the bright neon and the pitch black alleyways.

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@CheekoMost AAA games these days use physically based rendering (PBR) to some degree, so yes, lights have broadly real world values and the lighting shaders work in a way that approximates physical behaviour of light. It’s a big job to get right. I would say PBR has been almost a revolution in how the industry builds content over the past decade. 


@ZOK pull yourself together man!

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4 minutes ago, Calashnikov said:

Geometric shapes have been used to evoke certain specific feelings for the viewer within religious art and architectural contexts since forever, genius.

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacred_geometry

Pardon me for skim-reading that, but what you're suggesting appears to require a belief in a god, a creator. That may explain my dismissiveness of Rothko's art and people's reactions to it. 

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3 minutes ago, Calashnikov said:

@Thor here no doubt believes that the black monolith in 2001: A Space Odyssey could easily be replaced with some random kid’s Furby and still manage to evoke the same sense of awe, bewilderment and dread that the original form evokes in the viewer.

Nice strawman. :coffee:

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13 minutes ago, Thor said:

Pardon me for skim-reading that, but what you're suggesting appears to require a belief in a god, a creator. That may explain my dismissiveness of Rothko's art and people's reactions to it. 

 

You don't need to believe in god to experience awe.

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15 minutes ago, Thor said:

Nice strawman. :coffee:


Not really. The designers on 2001 settled on a big black rectangle in an attempt to inspire a certain response in the viewer, no doubt informed by our learned understanding and innate associations with ‘sacred geometry’, no matter how subliminal they may be. I also don’t think you need to be religious to feel a sense of awe from walking through the Sagrada Familia either, for what it’s worth. The scale, shape, materiality and colours all combine to make us feel a certain way. The same can be said of Rothko’s paintings.

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20 minutes ago, Thor said:

Pardon me for skim-reading that, but what you're suggesting appears to require a belief in a god, a creator. That may explain my dismissiveness of Rothko's art and people's reactions to it. 

Have you ever seen a Rothko? 

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3 hours ago, Thor said:

That's actually a fair comment, and what inspires awe in some won't in others. I can appreciate that.

 

I'm an atheist but can still experience awe in a cathedral as that is what they are designed to do. Shock and awe wins minds...

 

Same with Rothko. I can very happily sit in front of his paintings for a very long time and experience a full range of emotions, subject to my mood. I see them more as contemplative spaces and that means, given a little time, they can reflect whatever I am feeling or allow me to work things out. They are best thought of as psycho-analysists or therapists than priests but, really, can be anything to anyone subject to the viewer's mood or perception. I can't get any of that from a painting of a sea view or a horse however well, or not, it has been executed...

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I'm a very broad church when it comes to art, I have to say. I'm perfectly happy with a lot of modern art, but I'm equally at home when gazing at something more traditional. If art speaks to you in some way, then that's probably a good thing all 'round. 

 

I joke about Kandinsky, and have never liked his work (despite spending a year studying his stuff amongst other modernists of the period), but I can certainly appreciate how people could like his work. I've not been able to glean enough out of it for me to appreciate it enough really. Rothko I can very much appreciate - colours, the textures of the paint and how it's been painted etc etc.

 

Also, everything is geometric. Everything. It's a wonderful thing.

 

Also also, Mark Rothko was the best Hulk. 

 

Definitely.

 

Oh, hang on...

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The only significance I ever attributed to the shape of the monolith in 2001 was that a perfect geometric rectangle was quite clearly out of place in prehistoric earth, and unambiguously unnatural. By itself, the fact that it was a rectangle did not particularly give me the heeby-jeebies.

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4 hours ago, Calashnikov said:


Not really. The designers on 2001 settled on a big black rectangle in an attempt to inspire a certain response in the viewer, no doubt informed by our learned understanding and innate associations with ‘sacred geometry’, no matter how subliminal they may be. I also don’t think you need to be religious to feel a sense of awe from walking through the Sagrada Familia either, for what it’s worth. The scale, shape, materiality and colours all combine to make us feel a certain way. The same can be said of Rothko’s paintings.

 

Actually, they decided on a black monolith because the clear pyramid that Arthur C. Clarke had written proved impossible to build, the clear slab that they came up with looked like shit under the studio lights, and the art director thought they could rescue the whole mess by painting it.

 

Edit - It turns out not literally by painting it, because they recycled the big clear turd in to a silver jubilee monument:

 

image.png.13482c89ac48cc236178416a2643728c.png
 

Edit 2- I was curious so I looked up the dimensions of the movie monolith, and the only number with any cosmic significance is that it was 69 inches wide. (Nice.)

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4 hours ago, Calashnikov said:

I also don’t think you need to be religious to feel a sense of awe from walking through the Sagrada Familia either, for what it’s worth. The scale, shape, materiality and colours all combine to make us feel a certain way.

See, I don't disagree with any of that.

 

4 hours ago, Calashnikov said:

The same can be said of Rothko’s paintings.

It's this I disagree with.

 

You're equating the sheer majesty of the Sagrada Familia to some coloured rectangles. 

 

Just ... no.

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14 minutes ago, Thor said:

See, I don't disagree with any of that.

 

It's this I disagree with.

 

You're equating the sheer majesty of the Sagrada Familia to some coloured rectangles. 

 

Just ... no.


Again, if you haven’t seen them in the flesh then you’ve really not seen them at all. Nothing quite prepares you for how big some of the Rothko paintings are.

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Yeah. They’re objects with very intense presence. They’re not mere pictures per se. 
 

You need to see the texture of the brush strokes, the way the glossy sections capture the light, while the matte sections recede into the background. They vibrate and murmur. The very deliberately considered colours vibrate in, around and on top of each other. Some sections of the composition appear to hover. There is spatial depth, proximity and distance, suggested purely by paint applied in stripes and shapes. Creating such a presence using not many visual components is not an easy thing to achieve. Believe me, I see plenty try in my line of work.

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