Jump to content

It's 2021 soon. What is retro?


Recommended Posts

8 hours ago, Dig Dug said:

I've been having arguments with friends about this all week.
I used to think retro stopped at dreamcast and modern began with PS2 because of a very big shift in game design trends between those two systems.
After much argument I am beginning to think we might have to start dividing games into more categories like Golden Age, Silver Age etc.

One thing is for sure, the 360 and PS3 are still far off from being "retro" in any way, shape or form. Games have not moved on that much since that genration. PS3 to PS4 isn't a massive jump like PS1 to PS2 or PS2 to PS3 was.

I think that if someone is collecting, playing or writing about PS3 or 360 games specifically, then they are taking part in the cultural activity/pass-time/hobby (or whatever) known as retrogaming. Don't forget that, as scary as it seems, there are people going back to, eg Fallout 3 or Project Gotham because they are nostalgic for their childhood gaming experiences.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Anne Summers said:

I think that if someone is collecting, playing or writing about PS3 or 360 games specifically, then they are taking part in the cultural activity/pass-time/hobby (or whatever) known as retrogaming. Don't forget that, as scary as it seems, there are people going back to, eg Fallout 3 or Project Gotham because they are nostalgic for their childhood gaming experiences.

 

Yep, let's say your first gaming memories are age 5, if that coincided with PGR coming out, which it might well then you are now 23 years old, quite possibly with a uni degree and a job that allows you a bit of mad money to rebuy those retro games.

 

Only the same as me buying a Spectrum game when Retro Gamer magazine started, and no-one complained about manic miner in their first issue.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Dudley said:

 

 

No, they stopped selling the original PS4 in 2016, so retro.


Ah! A pedant! golf clap! 
 

By that logic, minor and invisible hardware revisions make the old machine retro! 
 

No, you can still buy a PS4 brand new right now, be that slim or pro. You can’t buy a new PS3. 
 

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Kevvy Metal said:


Ah! A pedant! golf clap! 
 

By that logic, minor and invisible hardware revisions make the old machine retro! 
 

No, you can still buy a PS4 brand new right now, be that slim or pro. You can’t buy a new PS3. 
 

 

True, but if we're playing that game, when will the PS4 become retro? Because the PS5 is BC with the PS4 just as the Pro was...

Link to post
Share on other sites

The inspiration for my OP was Need For Speed Hot Pursuit Remastered. Because frankly, it's not remastered at all. It's still an awesome game but playing on a Base PS4 reveals it to be the same 30fps experience with the same graphics. And when you play remasters of games from the previous generation (when the games were HD anyway) you generally only get a 60fps version of what you had before. I've bought SotCollssus, Bulletstorm and Bioshock and they are pretty much the same game you already own. A 1080p game upscaled to 4K automatically looks practically as good as if someone went back and manually re-drew it all in 4K.

 

Then we discussed in another thread about how the PS5 and Xbox Series bring you the same gameplay, the same genres as last gen, just in 4K 60fps. There isn't the leap from sprites to 3D, to real world physics, to CD soundtracks etc. The PS5 does everything you already had just a bit better, but there's nothing revolutionary. 

 

So I don't think that the definition of retro is based on the dates any more. The first Assassin's Creed game was 2007 and should be considered retro but in terms of gameplay and style it's much the same as the latest one and doesn't feel retro.  So yeah, maybe retro is a fixed era, from Manic Miner to... some point in time... And then everything after than becomes another era with a different name.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 26/12/2020 at 13:05, dumpster said:

Where does retro begin? More importantly where does it end?


Dreamcast is the most recent console I consider retro.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 29/12/2020 at 11:32, Monkeyspill said:

I remember re-connecting up the Commodore 64 in the mid 90s and thinking “wow, these games are old” - about games that were 10 years old at most. I don’t think the term “retro games” existed then.

 

Games from around 2010 seem pretty modern still.

 

The C64 sadly stopped working about 20 years ago. Emulation just isn’t the same.

 

Emulation is pretty good now except for Uridium. It's impossible to recreate that smooth scrolling on emulators. I'd love a simple update.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Unofficial Who said:

 

Emulation is pretty good now except for Uridium. It's impossible to recreate that smooth scrolling on emulators. I'd love a simple update.

I mean you can’t emulate the feeling of using a physical tape deck. I know you can get tape files but it’s not the same. Or the smell of frazzling electrics from the power supply.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Monkeyspill said:

I mean you can’t emulate the feeling of using a physical tape deck. I know you can get tape files but it’s not the same. Or the smell of frazzling electrics from the power supply.

 

I don't miss either the long load of a cassette tape or having to pull a smoking power supply onto the balcony in much the same way as a Ghostbuster would leave a ballroom with a ghost trap.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Unofficial Who said:

 

I don't miss either the long load of a cassette tape or having to pull a smoking power supply onto the balcony in much the same way as a Ghostbuster would leave a ballroom with a ghost trap.

That’s all part of the experience for me. Make a cup of tea. Getting all of your friends to wait outside the room because if they get too close to the cassette deck, it won’t load. Slapping the top of the portable TV to stop it from flickering. Hitting the space bar with your foot to throw grenades in Commando (until it fell off the table and broke). 

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Monkeyspill said:

That’s all part of the experience for me. Make a cup of tea. Getting all of your friends to wait outside the room because if they get too close to the cassette deck, it won’t load. Slapping the top of the portable TV to stop it from flickering. Hitting the space bar with your foot to throw grenades in Commando (until it fell off the table and broke). 

 

I never experienced any of that.

 

Mine was just stick the game on to load, go and do something else, come back to see if it had loaded (usually it had).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, I don't remember intermittent loading being a problem with the C64. We initially struggled to get a decent working C2N as a lot of them were faulty from the factory when we bought ours, but after that it was nice and reliable. It seemed to be more common amongst my Spectrum owning friends.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Vespa Alex said:

Yep, I don't remember intermittent loading being a problem with the C64. We initially struggled to get a decent working C2N as a lot of them were faulty from the factory when we bought ours, but after that it was nice and reliable. It seemed to be more common amongst my Spectrum owning friends.

 

I was mostly a Spectrum gamer, but it rarely happened to me.  One or two games didn't load consistently, but they were very much the exception not the rule.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it's really a non-issue for most people who enjoy playing games that were made both more and less than x years ago.

 

Individuals can use "retro" however they like, and depending on their age retrogaming might mean the spectrum, the 360, or anything in between.

Magazine and game publishers can continue to use it however they suspect will maximise sales.

 

I don't think it's worth the effort even wasting time trying to define "retro" games and think it would probably be better if we could move towards just talking about playing "games", even if we've been sold a new console since the game in question's release.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Vespa Alex said:

Yep, I don't remember intermittent loading being a problem with the C64. We initially struggled to get a decent working C2N as a lot of them were faulty from the factory when we bought ours, but after that it was nice and reliable. It seemed to be more common amongst my Spectrum owning friends.

Thinking about it now - it was more my friend that had issues loading. He had a newer chunkier-looking C2N that might not have been official. It wouldn’t load reliably if we were both in the room for some reason. 
 

Mine only got shit after the cover broke and it got caked with dust and hair inside.
 

Weirdly, the most reliable tapes I had were the dodgy hacked ones that loaded super fast. I’m still convinced that manufacturers made deliberately shitty copies so they wouldn’t work well if you made copies on a tape-to-tape machine.

Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the things I like that MS are doing are getting rid of the concept of gens and making gaming more fluid. No need to hit the reset button every five years. Games from many years ago are ready to buy to sit alongside future more graphically sophisticated titles to be judged in their own right. This is how I’ve wanted gaming to be for many years. If a game can be bought, downloaded and played on your xbox as you drop out of a Sea of thieves session is it really retro? I’d say classic games is a better definition as I can pick up and play Nights, Shenmue, Radiant Silvergun etc as easily as I can Watch Dogs Legion and they share the same library on the same hardware then they are no longer ‘retro’. 
 

Leave the fetishisation of old hardware and software to the collector types who may consider their games ‘retro’ and scoff at playing Metal Slug on a Series S/X. But in general it’s an outdated term that does those games no justice. I’d simply consider games to be ‘modern’ and those built using older engines and tools as simply ‘classic’ or ‘older’ games. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

For me, it's anything up until consoles firmly entered the online gaming era (so until Xbox Live and PSN), which coincidentally is around the time I went to live on my own.

 

So basically it's everything I played when I still lived at home (NES / SNES / N64 / PS2 / DC / GC).

Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember when i got my first pc in '97 i was playing "retro" snes games :lol:

 

But i class retro as 2 generations behind now. So it's slowly coming round that XBOX 360, PS3 and Wii are retro. I mean they came out 15 years ago. The games might not look as retro as 16/8bit but truth be told to a lot of people those systems are now retro.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you started school when the 360 came out, you graduate university this year...

 

Your parents probably weren't together with the Ps1 came out.  Your parents may not have been born when the Atari 2600 did...

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Dudley said:

I started school at 5, They would be 21.

 

You may have started earlier of course.


I started at 3 but I was referring to most kids starting at 4 and the 360 being 15, hence 19.

Link to post
Share on other sites

There are some games I consider retro that are newer than games I don't!

 

So for me it's largely based on a genre's rate of change. Like how 3rd Strike and Driver are both 21.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.