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Perfect Dark


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28 minutes ago, Parksey said:

The problem with Perfect Dark as a franchise, if you can call it that, seeing as it's been dormant for 14 years and only consisted of two games, the second of which sort of stopped any momentum it had, is that it doesn't have an automatic presence in the FPS genre at the moment. 

 

Firstly, as I mentioned, it's a faded name. It's had two games (yeah, I'm not counting the GBC one) and is still mostly associated with a 20 year old N64 game. Perfect Dark Zero had a troubled development over two or three consoles and was dated upon release, with other FPS games easily eclipsing it. I forget it even exists at times. 

 

Back in 2000, console FPS's weren't half as numerous and weren't half as good. The N64 only really had it's immediate predecessor and some outliers confined to history like the Turok games. 

 

GoldenEye and PD were revolutionary on the N64, but they were doing so in an emerging genre. 

 

This new PD isn't doing that. Console FPS games are common and we aren't short on decent shooters. Likewise, PD's futuristic setting and plot were quite compelling back when games were made out of potatoes but spectacle, visuals and story are the backbone of any big title nowadays 

 

So I feel like the new PD may struggle to stand out and just be "another" FPS. The name isn't really that much of a draw, after the last title, and while the original carries a lot of nostalgic weight, I'm not sure that transfers into a compelling urge for a new title. I feel like there's a sense that PD was a great game and a cornerstone of FPS games on consoles, but it's something belonging to a different time. 

 

Just bringing out a sci-fi shooter isn't going to do much. Likewise, just having online multiplayer isn't going to differentiate it from countless others. 

 

For me, I'd quite like to see a return of a different type of shooter. Objective-based, with these detailed at the start of a level, leaving you to go do them on your own rather than being led through with characters chattering in your ear, a trail of breadcrumbs showing your path through or progress being at the whim of set pieces and linear plot thread.  

 

I'd like to see no recharging health. No cover mechanics. Stealth akin to getting through Golden Eye's bunker unseen or Carrington Villa rather than a constant radar, guard takedowns and cover systems. 

 

I'd like to see difficulty matter. Playing a modern FPS on the hardest setting tends to just reduce your health, make the enemies hit harder and make them more bullet spongey. It can be an exercise in frustration. 

 

The original PD made Perfect Agent give you more objectives - you essentially saw the "full" story of a level, whereas Easy just gave you the one task. Whole parts of the level would open up on the harder difficulties. It was actually worth playing them. You would plan a route and learn guard patterns, executing your plan, your shots and them with precision and without losing health. Heck, PD even made you start a level in a much more precarious sport on Perfect Agent - are you in the hills with a sniper or are you facing down the barrel of a gun. 

 

In many ways I'm going to contradict myself now and say that while PD and GoldenEye are very much products of their time and like the FPS market has sort of moved on and become a much more bloated, competitive genre, I do think there is place for some of their design to be reintroduced and freshened up. 

Rumour is it's not a FPS - it's going to be a futuristic third person stealth game a bit like Splinter Cell.

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3 hours ago, Vemsie said:

There's some serious talent behind. Also, we need more cli-fi in videogames.


The developer introduction video seemed to be playing up, but didn’t directly mention the background of anyone in particular. What exactly is their pedigree? 

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10 minutes ago, Popo said:

The developer introduction video seemed to be playing up, but didn’t directly mention the background of anyone in particular. What exactly is their pedigree? 

Some of them:

Quote

According to studio head Darrell Gallagher on LinkedIn, the studio recently hired 16 new people to the company. Those include hiring Remi Lacoste, the director of Shadow of the Tomb Raider and Marvel’s Avengers, and Christine Thompson, the narrative lead writer for Destiny 2, to a lead writer position.

Francisco Aisa García, a former programmer at Naughty Dog and Rockstar Games, was brought on as a senior gameplay engineer, and Richard Burns, a UI artist formerly of Playground Games, was hired as a UI/UX lead.

There have been other big-name hires as well in the two years since the studio was announced. In 2019, the studio hired Red Dead Redemption writer Christian Cantamessa and God of War franchise lead producer Brian Westergaard. The studio also hired Sunset Overdrive director Drew Murray and Tomb Raider reboot director Dan Neuburger.

Other recent hires include Justin Perez, the hero designer on Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order, and combat and systems designer on Mass Effect Andromeda. Senior technical designer at Crystal Dynamics Daniel Streamer was also hired.

 

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Genuinely can’t believe Microsoft have decided to triple down with another past-it’s-prime sci-fi shooter franchise rather than possibly expand to I dunno, something completely underserved by their current offerings like a real world setting, a historical setting, anything.

 

It’s so fucking old it’s idea of futuristic technology was small remote controllable drones, which you’ve been able to get under the Christmas tree for the last decade and appear in every modern day game.

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Wasn't too interested when the teaser began as I'm not a huge fan of fps games but my eyes widened as soon as I saw the dataDyne logo.

 

I do hope it's tighter, contained missions with objectives scaling with the difficulty. Chucking a few dozen players in could make counter-op play more interesting than in was back in the day too.

 

I'm sure it'll look different by the time it actually releases several years from now but I'm glad it's not another Blade Runner aesthetic. 

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25 minutes ago, kensei said:

Would really like it to be the modern evolution of Goldeneye and Perfect Dark's FPS design that never happened because everything became Halo then CoD.


Lets not forget Timesplitters 2! 
 

The evolutionary missing link, perhaps?

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I really can’t see the point in reviving the Perfect Dark series - the first game was notable because it was the follow up to Goldeneye, and the second game was notable for being fucking terrible. The setting itself is a super-generic Blade Runner knockoff future, with bits of the X-Files, manga films, and whatever else was popular in the late nineties when it was being developed. 
 

however! Goldeneye and Perfect Dark had some really interesting design aspects that could do with being revived. Maybe it’s the fact that it was developed by people who’d never made a game before, and seemingly didn’t really play FPS games either, but Goldeneye had a really unique feel to it. The guards reacted and interacted in a way that was completely unlike any other game, before or since - it feels weird to type this out, but their reactions to being shot and their animations around shooting back at you felt super-real, and much more like real humans than anything else. You got this sort of hyperspecific little action moments from gunfights, especially in slow-motion, that reminded me a lot of John Woo films. It felt like some extinct phylum of FPS, that died out in the N64 extinction event. 
 

You just don’t get that in FPS games any more. You just get generic flinching when someone’s reacting to being shot. I don’t care about the Perfect Darkverse, but something that captured the feel of Goldeneye and PD, using modern physics and AI, could be really interesting. 

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9 minutes ago, Dirty Harry Potter said:

I find the lack of actual next gen content from MS very frustrating tbh.

What is "next gen" content these days anyway?

 

FPS market is completely saturated IMHO. In fact think gaming in general is just saturated. It would be great to play something genuinely new and fresh. That doesn't involve shooting at things. Call of the Sea was interesting but well just Myst in another location really - I actually thought Myst was and still is much more inventive. As pretty as Call Of The Sea is.

 

Anyhow Perfect Dark see what they do I guess. 

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5 minutes ago, K said:

I really can’t see the point in reviving the Perfect Dark series - the first game was notable because it was the follow up to Goldeneye, and the second game was notable for being fucking terrible. The setting itself is a super-generic Blade Runner knockoff future, with bits of the X-Files, manga films, and whatever else was popular in the late nineties when it was being developed. 
 

however! Goldeneye and Perfect Dark had some really interesting design aspects that could do with being revived. Maybe it’s the fact that it was developed by people who’d never made a game before, and seemingly didn’t really play FPS games either, but Goldeneye had a really unique feel to it. The guards reacted and interacted in a way that was completely unlike any other game, before or since - it feels weird to type this out, but their reactions to being shot and their animations around shooting back at you felt super-real, and much more like real humans than anything else. You got this sort of hyperspecific little action moments from gunfights, especially in slow-motion, that reminded me a lot of John Woo films. It felt like some extinct phylum of FPS, that died out in the N64 extinction event. 
 

You just don’t get that in FPS games any more. You just get generic flinching when someone’s reacting to being shot. I don’t care about the Perfect Darkverse, but something that captured the feel of Goldeneye and PD, using modern physics and AI, could be really interesting. 

More or less agree with this.

 

Just think of every game with drones that came out the last generation. That's the environment this game will be operating in and it is over saturated. Just slapping climate science-fiction label on it isn't going to move the needle. I would take something like NieR: Automata over this any day. 

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1 minute ago, Jg15 said:

I'm up for what ever this is and if it is an FPS all the better!

My bet is that Microsoft will turn this into a Splinter Cell esque game more than anything.

 

Demand is high for that one among the Xbox crowd and Ubisoft is letting people down.

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Now if MS got some VR support into the Xbox and Perfect Dark was essentially a Half Life Alyx type experience. That might get it noticed perhaps? Never going to happen as MS are far to conservative. 


Not sure how putting it out on a niche platform that's struggled to get any traction beyond tech nerds would make it a bigger hit.

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The original perfect dark started off amazingly well but went to pot when the aliens started appearing. It still has the greatest selection of guns in any game, mind. 
 

When a FPS is done well, it’s right up there near the top of gaming experiences. I wish you all the best, Marvel: Avengers guy. 

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