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His House (Netflix)


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Um... has anyone else seen this? Really not sure how I feel about this. 
 

Horror that focuses on a married couple who seek asylum in the U.K. They lose a young girl in the crossing. 
There’s racial abuse of black people by black people. Is that a thing?
There are scenes of drowned people of colour (presumed more asylum seekers), including children. 
There are scenes depicting what I can only describe as tribal makeup and dress. No idea if there’s any authenticity to them or if they’re purely a trope. 
There’s suggestion of entitlement by asylum seekers. 


It seems full of stereotypes in a really bad way, and I can’t help but feel the use of drowned asylum seekers as “the monsters” is in really poor taste. And I mean really. And children. In fairly accurate makeup depicting death by drowning. 
 

 

Am I totally missing something? How can something like this be made in the current climate?

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There is an article on the BBC

How His House turns refugee lives into horror film https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-54749782
 

That's the idea behind the British film His House, in which two young asylum seekers from South Sudan struggle to adjust to a new life in a rundown house in a small English town, where they feel a terrible evil lurks behind their walls. 

 

 

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That article references Saint Maud which I thought was great. I've got to say I've enjoyed the current generation of horror movies that have eschewed supernatural elements in favour of psychological depth or humans being nasty to each other.

 

Must give this a try.

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I thought this was great. Wasn’t to sure where things were going in the first half, but found it all pulled together powerfully in the second half.

 

Horror has a fine tradition of tackling difficult subjects, and for me this is a great example of how effective it can be.

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15 minutes ago, NexivRed said:

Okay. Put more simply; I think the reason I felt the way I did is because it didn’t seem appropriate to take these issues and turn them into entertainment. But it’s just me I guess. 

 

Layering serious messaging into entertainment is a useful tool in getting said messaging to those who may not experience it otherwise.

 

You seem to have watched the film from a specific perspective and projected that into reading the film the way you did but I would recommend another viewing with fresh eyes as it really is a very fine piece of film making.

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Bazjam said:

 

 

Horror has a fine tradition of tackling difficult subjects, and for me this is a great example of how effective it can be.

 

 

Indeed, for another recent example see The Relic's moving portrayal of dementia.

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12 minutes ago, Mike S said:

 

 

Indeed, for another recent example see The Relic's moving portrayal of dementia.

Just posted about this in the other thread. Had a great weekend watching both of these. Horror seems to be in a very good place at the moment.

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1 minute ago, Bazjam said:

Just posted about this in the other thread. Had a great weekend watching both of these. Horror seems to be in a very good place at the moment.

 

 

Sorry, I missed that but, yeah, horror and especially the more intelligent, considered end of the genre, is in fine form just now. Still very much looking forward to Saint Maud but having watched Possessor, The Relic, and His House in the last 3 or 4 weeks it has already been a very strong end of the year.

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1 minute ago, Mike S said:

 

 

Sorry, I missed that but, yeah, horror and especially the more intelligent, considered end of the genre, is in fine form just now. Still very much looking forward to Saint Maud but having watched Possessor, The Relic, and His House in the last 3 or 4 weeks it has already been a very strong end of the year.

That’s the end of the genre that I love, and it feels like there has been a welcome return to it in the last five years or so. 
 

Desperate to see Saint Maud. Due to shielding I’ve got to wait for the home release.

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1 hour ago, Mike S said:

You seem to have watched the film from a specific perspective


I don’t know what this means. I knew nothing about the film until I was watching it and felt more and more uncomfortable as it went on. I didn’t go in with a bias. 

 

 

7 minutes ago, Papaya Dance said:

The same logic could be applied to any war film. 


I didn’t think they were making movies about the war whilst the war was on, and I don’t remember participants of the war being demonised in their local communities.  It’s not the same to me. But whatever. 

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11 minutes ago, NexivRed said:


I don’t know what this means. I knew nothing about the film until I was watching it and felt more and more uncomfortable as it went on. I didn’t go in with a bias. 

 

 


I didn’t think they were making movies about the war whilst the war was on, and I don’t remember participants of the war being demonised in their local communities.  It’s not the same to me. But whatever. 

https://m.imdb.com/list/ls070247508/

 

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1 hour ago, NexivRed said:


I don’t know what this means. I knew nothing about the film until I was watching it and felt more and more uncomfortable as it went on. I didn’t go in with a bias. 

 

 


I didn’t think they were making movies about the war whilst the war was on, and I don’t remember participants of the war being demonised in their local communities.  It’s not the same to me. But whatever. 

I really think you’ve just miss read this film. It’s clearly empathetic, and indeed pro refugee. The writer/director is an up and coming young black filmmaker who took a lot of inspiration for the film from conversations he’d heard growing up in African and Caribbean communities. I felt it was pretty clear where his sympathy’s lay.

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2 hours ago, NexivRed said:


I don’t know what this means. I knew nothing about the film until I was watching it and felt more and more uncomfortable as it went on. I didn’t go in with a bias. 

 

 


I didn’t think they were making movies about the war whilst the war was on, and I don’t remember participants of the war being demonised in their local communities.  It’s not the same to me. But whatever. 

 

 

Everyone has bias, whether conscious or not, and it it is not necessarily a negative as seen, in your case, by your having a clear empathy for/favourable bias toward asylum seekers - hence your concerns with how you felt the film portrayed them.

 

You have seen the film as an anti-asylum seeker/anti-immigration piece which it demonstrably is not. I, and others, offered counter-points to your impressions and answered questions you asked on matters on which you were ignorant of so, as I suggested, it may be worthwhile rewatching the film from the perspective of it being very much on the side of the asylum seekers and not some racist tirade against them.

 

If the film made you uncomfortable then it has worked. We should not be comfortable with people having to cross the channel in a dinghy in order to escape war in their homeland.

 

Incidentally with regards to participants of war being demonised as the war happens then, yeah, that happens too.

 

 

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4 hours ago, Mike S said:

You have seen the film as an anti-asylum seeker/anti-immigration piece which it demonstrably is not.


No I didn’t. Anti anything is not how I saw it. I felt it was making light of the subject by using it to entertain people, and to enforce stereotypes. Don’t tell me how I saw something. 
 

Quote

I, and others, offered counter-points to your impressions and answered questions you asked on matters on which you were ignorant of so, as I suggested, it may be worthwhile rewatching the film from the perspective of it being very much on the side of the asylum seekers and not some racist tirade against them.

 

Why the fuck are you talking to me like you have a right to change my view on something? I don’t care how many “counterpoints” you list; I feel the way I feel. 

 

Quote

 

If the film made you uncomfortable then it has worked. We should not be comfortable with people having to cross the channel in a dinghy in order to escape war in their homeland.

.


I don’t need you on your high horse thanks. This is exactly why I told you to put me on ignore. I fucking hate the way you speak to me. It makes me feel like shit. 
For some reason, everything other than your posts is ticked on my ignore list and I don’t know why that has changed. But it’s fixed now so do me a favour and don’t ever quote me again. 

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7 hours ago, NexivRed said:


I didn’t think they were making movies about the war whilst the war was on, and I don’t remember participants of the war being demonised in their local communities.  It’s not the same to me. But whatever. 


There have been lots of films about wars made during said wars, featuring participants who were demonised in their local communities (especially Vietnam). Also the horror genre has a long history of drawing attention towards controversial cultural issues, Night of the Living Dead is probably the most obvious example.

 

I haven’t seen His House, sounds like the immigration theme is more text than subtext, but I don’t think any subject should be out of bounds, especially if it’s from a filmmaker with a personal investment in that culture. It’s their story to tell.

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46 minutes ago, NexivRed said:


No I didn’t. Anti anything is not how I saw it. I felt it was making light of the subject by using it to entertain people, and to enforce stereotypes. Don’t tell me how I saw something. 
 

 

Why the fuck are you talking to me like you have a right to change my view on something? I don’t care how many “counterpoints” you list; I feel the way I feel. 

 


I don’t need you on your high horse thanks. This is exactly why I told you to put me on ignore. I fucking hate the way you speak to me. It makes me feel like shit. 
For some reason, everything other than your posts is ticked on my ignore list and I don’t know why that has changed. But it’s fixed now so do me a favour and don’t ever quote me again. 

 

You actually invited discussion on this film, 'Am I missing something?' I, and others, have pointed out that, yes, you really are.

 

As already stated, I have offered counter points to your impressions because that is what you requested - you ignored all of them. I tried to do so politely as I have previously seen you spin discussions in which your opinion is critiqued into a personal attack on yourself. For that reason I trod pretty carefully in offering a different opinion and tried not to even give the suggestion that I am making some huge sleight on your character. It is therefore a bit disappointing, but no great surprise to read this bizarre attack on me but, fuck me, it is tiring.

 

Maybe, when inviting discussion on a subject in the future, engage with the discussion rather than treat everything as a personal attack when that really is not the case.

 

I have no idea why you might be blocking me as we seem aligned on most things but, hey ho, it may be for the best if I return the favour as reading this sort of shite is no good for anyone. I'll miss your fluffy dog pics though..

 

EDIT: Actually, having re-read your post I'd like some clarification on this bit 'This is exactly why I told you to put me on ignore. I fucking hate the way you speak to me. It makes me feel like shit.'  I have very little engagement with you other than the odd like of a post so would kin d of like examples of this hate speech you appear to be accusing me of.  I don't recall you ever telling me to put you on ignore so genuinely feel that you have me confused with someone else. 

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