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Who Did It First?


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One that should have an obvious answer, but I'll offer it - QTEs.

 

In my mind, Dragon's Lair introduced the concept and Shenmue popularised a more dynamic implementation, but I'm open to alternative takes. :) 

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3 hours ago, Made of Ghosts said:

 

Wiki reckons Jet Set Radio beat Wacky Races to the cel-shading crown.


Pretty sure last time this was discussed it was discovered Mega Man Legends beat it by about 4 years.

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Just now, Made of Ghosts said:

 

Nah, I mean an attack that you can do any time without switching weapons? That's what made it useful in Halo.


Slappers only.

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Just now, Made of Ghosts said:

Oh you're doing a "bit", ok super.


No, I thought you meant you could choose melee at any time (I.e. having picked up a weapon didn’t disable melee), not both were able to be used without weapon changing. Then I was being silly.

 

Slappers only is the best way to play though.

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On 10/10/2020 at 11:02, schmojo said:

Didn't Outlaws do the sniper rifle first?


In a first-person perspective game? Midwinter must have it beat by several years. Plus open-world, multiple ways to reach your objective, recruitable NPCs, etc. Man, that game had vision.


Hostages also had a sniper rifle section before that, but that was a self-contained, dedicated section, I think.

 

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First game to have a good, joypad-based typing interface: Beyond Good & Evil.

 

Last game to have a good, joypad-based typing interface: also Beyond Good & Evil.

 

 

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31 minutes ago, GamesGamesGames said:

First game to have a weapon select wheel?

Splinter Cell Pandora Tomorrow's mercs in the multiplayer mode (2004) is the first time I remember encountering this. You'd click the left stick in and use the right stick to select weapons or items (and I think vice versa for more items). Red Faction Guerrilla was also mentioned as an early practitioner, but that was 2009.

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5 minutes ago, Wiper said:

First game to have a good, joypad-based typing interface: Beyond Good & Evil.

 

Last game to have a good, joypad-based typing interface: also Beyond Good & Evil.

 

Killzone's text entry system was also good: joystick one of the eight directions (+neutral) to select a group of four letters, and then press a face button to specify one of the four.

 

But as I never played it online, I think I only ever used it to enter the name of my save file at the start of the game, and then never again.

 

(This is the only video illustrating it I could find on YouTube - if you watch it, make sure to turn the volume down!)

 

 

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On 10/10/2020 at 16:32, ScouserInExile said:

In what way? Like target a specific enemy for attacks? I seem to remember ultra crappy beat em up The Crow: City of Angels had that. I think possibly Tekken Force mode in Tekken 3 did as well. I have a vague inkling that one of the Alone in the Dark series did it too.


I don’t know what AITD game you mean, but both that Crow game and Tekken 3 came out after OOT. Tekken is like 3 years later.

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16 minutes ago, Broker said:


I don’t know what AITD game you mean, but both that Crow game and Tekken 3 came out after OOT. Tekken is like 3 years later.

Ocarina of Time: November 1998 US and JP release.

 

Tekken 3 (PS1): March 1998 (JP)

 

The Crow City of Angels (PS1): February 1997 (US)

 

We are talking about the same game, aren't we? Ocarina of Time on N64?  Or have I missed the point somewhere?

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37 minutes ago, ScouserInExile said:

Ocarina of Time: November 1998 US and JP release.

 

Tekken 3 (PS1): March 1998 (JP)

 

The Crow City of Angels (PS1): February 1997 (US)

 

We are talking about the same game, aren't we? Ocarina of Time on N64?  Or have I missed the point somewhere?


No I’ve got the year OOT came out completely wrong :lol:

 

Sorry.

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2 minutes ago, Qazimod said:

First game to have a corpse run? Die, respawn, trek back to where you died and reclaim your belongings? Was it Diablo

 

I think it was Wizardry? But even then, it might have been something that was carried over from all the really early proto-roguelikes on mainframe systems.

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1 minute ago, GamesGamesGames said:

First game to feature teleportation?

 

Instinct says Gauntlet but I'm sure there were others before that.


Does the hyperspace warp in Spacewar! count? ;) 

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17 minutes ago, matt0 said:

 

I think it was Wizardry? But even then, it might have been something that was carried over from all the really early proto-roguelikes on mainframe systems.

 

Yeah, Wizardry 1 allowed that - you had a pool of 20 characters and took 6 in at a time. So if you knew where one party got killed, another could pick up your bones and take 'em back to the surface. Then either pay a temple for a resurrection, or get a high-level in-party priest to do it.

 

Me and my flatmates had a shared game going back in the 80s, where we'd each have five characters and 'borrow' an extra one for each delve. With a sliding scale of rates/favours for rescues and resurrections...

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55 minutes ago, GamesGamesGames said:

First game to feature teleportation?

 

Instinct says Gauntlet but I'm sure there were others before that.

Didn't Asteroids(1979) have a teleport button? It'd warp you to a random point on the screen, iirc.

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