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Does Anyone Like Crafting?


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Generally, no. I didn't really like it in Horizon for example, even though it fits the hunter-gatherer theme. I did like it in TLoU2, because it added a nice dynamic to the gameplay loop. Being wounded for example, and needing to find a temporary safe spot to craft a medkit or a weapon that could give me the edge in combat, added some extra tension.
Also, I didn't mind rummaging through rooms for supplies in that game, because I treated it like a breather between the combat and some of it was tied to optional combat encounters, little story moments, lore and puzzles. And the environmental design was so stunning that it was a joy to explore every room. This is more of a problem in open worlds, as everything looks similar.

 

It fits certain games, but it is overused.

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It's often just a pain. I think back to The Witcher 3 and how you'd have a million recipes and a million ingredients but you'd nearly always be missing one that you needed to make a recipe and you wouldn't have a clue where to buy it from or find it so you just carry on and maybe you'll stumble across it and maybe you won't but you've lost interest by that point.

 

That's what I dislike about it - it feels random whether you have all the necessary ingredients at any given time or not and I'm sure as hell not making a special trip to a particular part of the map in the hope of finding some bloody dandelion petals or wolf tongue or whatever.

 

Crafting in a game like TLOU, fine. It's linear anyway, it fits the world and you're never far from any particular component. In an open world game it's usually more trouble than it's worth though.

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I quite liked spinning the analogue sticks round to concoct potions in Bayonetta. 

 

Fortunately going into the menus to do it rarely felt like a chore, because it was so rarely necessary:

 

The items it could create were entirely optional, and could also be purchased from shops. Also, those support items tended to reduce your score ranking when used, which discouraged their use.

 

So I only needed to make more if it was a real life-or-death emergency AND if I'd completely run out of purchased copies of those items. That didn't happen often!

 

Also, the ingredients to be mixed were acquired through normal gameplay; I never needed to go out of my way just to seek them out. And because it was easy to build up a big stockpile of those raw ingredients, numerous items could be concocted within one trip to the menu screen.

 

So crafting wasn't an annoyance - but did it add anything to the game? Not really, no. It was such a minor game mechanic that if it had been omitted entirely, all we'd have lost was a tiny little bit of player choice on which items to make, and the satisfying link between the circular stick motion and the game's on-screen/audio feedback.

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I admit I quite like the crafting in Dragon Quest XI. Partly because you'd often find recipes for equipment that was actually better than the stuff you already had. Partly because the process of crafting actually involved a little input and judgement, which then affected the quality of the item produced.

 

In many games though, it does feel like a waste of time. It's often a needless layer of systems to make sure you keep collecting everything that's not nailed down. I think it has a place if it can be turned into a meaningful interactive process, but mostly it could be stripped out altogether.

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Can't stand crafting in games at all and as soon as I see a game features it I lose all interest. It seems like needless busy work to me. 

 

I probably wouldn't have bought Animal Crossing if I'd realised about the crafting before hand, luckily you can play it with the minimum of crafting. 

 

In real life however I love getting the glitter and glue out with the kids. 

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It’s an almost instant ‘i’m out’ from me as its just a hateful busywork mechanic that management types now bolt into games because ‘Minecraft sold millions so we need crafting too’.

 

It was irritating after a bit in BotW and then the easter egg event in Animal crossing absolutely killed my interest in the game stone dead and i’ve not been back since.

 

It’s a brainless game of glorified hide and seek and inventory management that adds nothing other than playtime.

 

I wonder how much better BotW could be if it was totally stripped out and just replaced with buying or finding all the same stuff in game in shops/taverns etc.

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I'm always amazed that Assassin's Creed Origins didn't get more shit for its awful crafting. You had to kill half of Egypt to keep all your various shit levelled. Oh, but you could just buy all the stuff in the cash store though.

 

I think it's fine in The Witcher though. You can get by with items found in the world just fine, but if you decide to go after a certain armour set it's generally pretty straight forward.

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It was just a small boring gameplay mechanic that was introduced to pad out a couple of popular games a while back. 
 

Hundreds of developers and publishers, who are most of the time risk-averse box-ticking muppets, took a look and decided that it therefore must also be included in their new game, despite it not being the reason behind the original games success. Now it’s a thing.
 

It remains because it takes little development time but adds hours of busywork masquerading as gameplay.

 

It has made every single game worse, without exception. 
 

It needs to die. 

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Hate it. I end up just going into the menus every note and then and unlocking what I can with the bits I’ve found just by playing. At least Horizon had a thing where you could just hold a d pad button to quick craft arrows or whatever. 

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Turning things I’ve already accumulated anyway in to fun toys, maybe with a quick trip or two to fill in some gaps: yes yes.
 

Making me go out of the way to farm trash for things I actually need to progress: no no.

 

I’m near the end game in BotW and I’ve seldom needed to actually go out and harvest crafting ingredients, and now I’m converting random trash I forgot about in to high level armour.

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I think the introduction of crafting in Fallout 4 was an abysmal idea and was partly to blame for the clusterfuck that was Fallout 76. What makes Fallout 3 and F:NV so great was the focus on exploring this new world, not carting a load of shopping trolleys home so that I could make structural art. 
 

I see the crafting you do in TLOU2 and Horizon more as basic resource management and so within the focus and setting of the game they’re appropriate. Good luck to people who want to spend time making incredible structures in Fallout 76, but it leaves me rather cold. I want to spend my time exploring the ravaged world, not stuck in a bric and brac shack. 

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It's the combination of crafting and inventory management that really pisses me off - not only having to collect a million bits of junk but also having to regularly clear out your inventory precisely because you've just collected a million bits of junk. Witcher 3, I'm looking at you.

 

As a mechanic in its own right, though - not just as padding - crafting can be OK. Forager, for instance, has just hit GamePass and is a game just about crafting, it's really stripped down to its most basic level, and it's absolutely compulsive.

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Didn't mind it in Skyrim, when blacksmiths and shopkeepers usually had the ingredients you needed, although that did render it rather pointless.

 

Have hated it in pretty much every other game I've played with it.

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2 hours ago, Fletch said:

I probably wouldn't have bought Animal Crossing if I'd realised about the crafting before hand, luckily you can play it with the minimum of crafting.

 

What?? How do you play AC?

 

Love it or loathe one of the main things to do is find new recipes and craft them plus collecting most of the collectables involves crafting tools all the time.

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24 minutes ago, Stopharage said:

I think the introduction of crafting in Fallout 4 was an abysmal idea and was partly to blame for the clusterfuck that was Fallout 76. What makes Fallout 3 and F:NV so great was the focus on exploring this new world, not carting a load of shopping trolleys home so that I could make structural art. 
 

I see the crafting you do in TLOU2 and Horizon more as basic resource management and so within the focus and setting of the game they’re appropriate. Good luck to people who want to spend time making incredible structures in Fallout 76, but it leaves me rather cold. I want to spend my time exploring the ravaged world, not stuck in a bric and brac shack. 

 

My girlfriend absolutely loves it. She must have spent dozens of hours kitting out her various houses and bases in Fallout 4.

 

I have no interest in it at all. We got to the point where when it was my turn to play (we share a gaming PC in the living room) she would ask me to hand over the pad so she could do home improvements in MY game. Which was fine by me, saved me having to do it.

 

I've downloaded FO76 (Game Pass for Windows 10) but we haven't tried it yet. She's hundreds of hours into Animal Crossing, and is forever kitting out her various houses and bases and oh wait it's the same game.

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5 minutes ago, ChewMagma said:

 

What?? How do you play AC?

 

Love it or loathe one of the main things to do is find new recipes and craft them plus collecting most of the collectables involves crafting tools all the time.

 

Like old school animal crossing just, fishing, bugging and fossilising with a bit of turnipping thrown in for good measure. I'll buy new tools from the cranny and only do the bare minimum crafting needed to get the town up together.

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I don't like in the Resident Evil remakes how you don't get many ammo pickups. Instead you get gunpowder, strong gunpowder, high grade gunpowder.  Different combinations gives you different types of ammo. In Resi3 especially I don't see the point. It's such a good speed run game with very few puzzles to slow down the action, so why not just have ammo pickups?

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@Alex W. nailed it - when it’s something in the background that lets you ditch all of the stuff you’ve gathered and rewards you with neat gear, it’s fine. However, when it’s a mandatory requirement that puts everything else on hold for a lengthy material grind, it’s no fun.

 

Material collection should be a happy side-effect of the core gameplay loop, not a compulsory stopgap that’s completely soul-destroying...

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Context is key... in games like TLOU and Days Gone where it fits thematically and can add to tension and atmosphere I quite like it, it can help drive the feeling of hopelessness and desperation you might expect. Generally though it feels like an overused mechanic - I'm less happy about it when faced with an enormous list of ingredients or where it thematically feels off, whereby it mainly elicits boredom and frustration

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I love the crafting mechanic when used correctly, in the correct game. Unfortunately, as had been mentioned, it has been added to almost every game, with little thought or commitment to making it work.

 

I like that crafting can overcome the problem of ammo crates being littered all over the place in random spots, ruining the story immersion, so I can get behind it for that purpose. However, I find the idea of all these characters who are mainly shoot/kill types, suddenly becoming advanced craftsmen, smithees or armourers, a bizarre concept. Even worse when they spend much more time crafting stuff rather than fighting stuff.

 

In solo survival games like Subnautica or The Long Dark etc. the crafting mechanic is key to progress and survival. The character simply has to adapt to survive. In games that have large, populated worlds, it makes no sense to craft your own stuff, when that isn't core to the game.

 

Imagine having a crafting mechanic in Forza Horizon 4, having to drive to pick up loot, then discover receipes and craft them at a workshop, to get a better car. That is effectively how so many on-foot games essentially implement crafting in their games.

 

Honestly, the whole Fallout series jumped the shark with the base building introduced in 4. Base construction ( providing income/materials to allow things to be built for you or re-constructed) makes sense. Adding individual sodding walls and doors to create your own house is just absurd in the context of the game.

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I've just ended my time with No Man's Sky as there is so little to do other than inventory management geared around crafting. I understand there's a lot of love for the game but I must have spent the first 4 hours tediously mining stuff to combine with other stuff then flying off to get more stuff for other kit. Whole thing felt like completely artificial padding. And all that interspersed with little brick walls of full inventory, mandatory crafting of yet more kit upgrades blah blah. I'm even bored typing about it. And that's before we even get into base building. 

 

Crafting (cooking) in BOTW was great though! 

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Crafting is a tedious chore in 90% of games. It’s one of the main reasons I mostly gave up on single player games years ago. Horizon Zero Dawn is probably the game that pushed me over the edge. Cool world but all that gathering was compelling for the wrong reasons.

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I find it daunting, exhausting and the main reason I dropped so many games this gen, especially when it's combined with that annoying new button hold mechanic instead of a quick press that Destiny introduced. In Horizon I spent more time picking flowers and hunting rabbits to upgrade my inventory than I did fighting the Zoids. The actual game was picking flowers and hunting small mammals. Same as Last Of Us 2, the actual game was Advanced Drawer Rummaging Simulator, whilst a zombie apocalypse kicked off outside. Utter wank.

 

 

 

 

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I'm playing God of War at the moment and it is fantastic but as much as I love the dwarf characters, the layers of RPG-style crafting and customisation that have been bolted on to what is otherwise a fairly straightforward 3rd person action game is totally unnecessary.

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9 hours ago, Oh Danny Boy said:

Animal crossing new horizons is probably the worst crafting mechanic I’ve experienced. Do people enjoy added layers of tedium in their games? 

 

The crafting in this is so quintessentially Nintendo. It's like they looked at all the ways other games have made it less of a chore, ignored them completely then added a load of text windows on top that you have to mash through for every individual item you make. And if you don't have the items on your person then enjoy the trip back to your house to collect them from storage!

 

I'm the same as most I guess, if it suits the game and is a well implemented core mechanic then fine. If it's there but not really necessary I guess I'd question why it's there at all but whatever. It's got like RPG mechanics now though, just chucked in where it has no business being to tick a box.

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