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Feeling a bit flush so I have pre-ordered the 'all in' pack from Funstock. Outofstock more like, amirite? Nah seriously though, have to wait 2 months on delivery. Pre-ordered the 2 new carts this morning.

 

I haven't bought physical games in a looooong time, my last was TLOU on PS3. This has got me excited for collecting again. Thought it looked a bit naff at first, but the price point, reviews and cheap carts have pulled me in. If they keep releasing a couple of carts every few months I'll be happy to buy them all.

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5 hours ago, strider said:

I reckon they're going to aim for 2 carts a month. I can certainly manage that.

 

They did polls on social media, and 1-2 carts a month proved the most popular options.

 

Double-dipped on the Dizzy cart, got a signed one coming from the Fusion annual Kickstarter.

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I played the Evercade round Strider's.

 

I don't feel it's aimed at someone like me - who expects crystal clear perfect pixel fidelity.

 

It has a PSP screen I'm told, but even the "original size" option for games blurs the pixels. I suspect this is due to it insisting on filling the vertical height. If the emulated system uses slightly less pixels than the screen's height, it just stretches and blurs it to fit.

 

Perfect game to showcase this: Earthworm Jim stage one.

 

The background used chequered pixels to show colour gradation around the sun. On Evercade the pixel sizes shimmer, and they're blurry. Instead of a neat, uniform pattern, the pattern ripples as you move. When playing on the handheld. Play it on the TV and you can this problem no longer occurs.

 

The fix for this was simple: multiple the native resolution by x2 or x3 as appropriate, and simple allow a black squared border around the game screen when playing on handheld. By filling the vertical size, you end up with a screen more like 2.5 or something. And the image is also receiving slight anti-aliasing.

 

I'm sure some people will say I'm pedantic, but I don't really care. I own three (3) old CRTs specifically for old games so they look their best. So this isn't aimed at me.

Still, as long as everyone's enjoying it and the original creators are being rewarded, I'm not fussed. But I don't like it and will continue to just use emulators where I can make sure the pixels are crisp and uniform.

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8 hours ago, Dudley said:

Yeah there's nothing unfair there but you're right, it's not :)

 

i'm the same, i just don't get it at all, its not for me - i think people are being grifted.

 

But if you get something out of it, fair play.

 

 

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29 minutes ago, ulala said:

 

i'm the same, i just don't get it at all, its not for me - i think people are being grifted.

 

But if you get something out of it, fair play.

 

 


Grifted seems a bit harsh. It’s not for purists, sure – but it’s great for collectors and those who just want to play the games legally.

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5 minutes ago, Rex Grossman said:


Grifted seems a bit harsh. It’s not for purists, sure – but it’s great for collectors and those who just want to play the games legally.

 

you are right, its perhaps a bit harsh.

 

but you say it yourself, its "great for collectors" and that's the sentiment that i really wanted to express.

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1 minute ago, ulala said:

 

you are right, its perhaps a bit harsh.

 

but you say it yourself, its "great for collectors" and that's the sentiment that i really wanted to express.

 

I've said before I think this is more for collectors than anyone else. Sturdy boxes, numbered packaging, nice uniformity, steady release schedule etc… it's a collector's dream. It was pointed out earlier I think that this may be the last ever console to have 100% physical releases. 

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10 minutes ago, Rex Grossman said:

 

I've said before I think this is more for collectors than anyone else. Sturdy boxes, numbered packaging, nice uniformity, steady release schedule etc… it's a collector's dream. It was pointed out earlier I think that this may be the last ever console to have 100% physical releases. 

 

oh boy are those numbers cynical 

 

 

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19 minutes ago, Rex Grossman said:

 

I've said before I think this is more for collectors than anyone else. Sturdy boxes, numbered packaging, nice uniformity, steady release schedule etc… it's a collector's dream. It was pointed out earlier I think that this may be the last ever console to have 100% physical releases. 

 

Exactly, collectors like games, they don't *have* to be concerned about the kind of nerdy accuracy that while great, most of us will literally never notice.  I haven't noticed a single emulation inaccuracy on any of the 9 evercade carts I've played that has affected my play.

 

What I certainly have noticed is I have literally never used a better d-pad.

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I think we should all be celebrating that there are retro gaming options for everyone nowadays.

 

The Evercade is ideal for those want to have fun with the games and get to collect the releases without being gouged.

 

MiSTer is for the purists, Pi boxes for those who want a massive library and do t mind compromises, mini consoles for those who want a curated mix of authenticity and nostalgia, Analog for those who want the real games but the convenience of connecting to modern TV etc. 
 

Everyone is covered now.  Not everything works for everyone.

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4 hours ago, ulala said:

 

i'm the same, i just don't get it at all, its not for me - i think people are being grifted.

 

But if you get something out of it, fair play.

 

 

 

Vega and Vega+, or Elite Software's app, were a grift.

This is a good product from a company trying to do things the right way, licensing games properly.

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2 hours ago, Rex Grossman said:

I think we should all be celebrating that there are retro gaming options for everyone nowadays.

 

The Evercade is ideal for those want to have fun with the games and get to collect the releases without being gouged.

 

MiSTer is for the purists, Pi boxes for those who want a massive library and do t mind compromises, mini consoles for those who want a curated mix of authenticity and nostalgia, Analog for those who want the real games but the convenience of connecting to modern TV etc. 
 

Everyone is covered now.  Not everything works for everyone.

 

And indeed I own a Pi box and just about every mini console too.  Also an OSSC and a pile of real games.

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12 hours ago, Rex Grossman said:

 

I've said before I think this is more for collectors than anyone else. Sturdy boxes, numbered packaging, nice uniformity, steady release schedule etc… it's a collector's dream. It was pointed out earlier I think that this may be the last ever console to have 100% physical releases. 

Physical releases definitely seems to be it's main selling point. Personally I would far prefer it if it gave me access to an online store where I could buy the games for a couple of quid each. 

Drm-free please so I can carry on playing them when the store inevitably closes one day. 

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11 hours ago, Anne Summers said:

Physical releases definitely seems to be it's main selling point. Personally I would far prefer it if it gave me access to an online store where I could buy the games for a couple of quid each. 

Drm-free please so I can carry on playing them when the store inevitably closes one day. 

 

It's only a small company though. Something like that requires massive loads of investment and online infrastructure. If it was simple to do and brought enough money to make a profit then some of the bigger companies would hve done it ages ago. Only Nintendo really made waves with the the Wii shop but soon lost interest.

 

The other problem is when you release an online game it has to go off for an age rating in each country which costs around £10K per game certification. I don't think the likes of Ninja Golf or Desert Falcon would stand much chance in sales to make that back :lol: Whereas a single cartridge is rated as a whole bundle so much cheaper to produce, online doesn't allow for that.

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It'd also mean the unit itself would be more expensive, more hungry on power, need internal storage and have huge security problems an airgapped device will never suffer.

 

Still at least they didn't think it was a good idea to stream all the games eh?

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1 hour ago, Dudley said:

It'd also mean the unit itself would be more expensive, more hungry on power, need internal storage and have huge security problems an airgapped device will never suffer.

 

Still at least they didn't think it was a good idea to stream all the games eh?

 

I still think there's room for a games-on-demand retro service, not necessarily streaming, where you spend a few quid to own curated, definitive versions of classic games (not just ROMs downloaded from the internet running on standard open-source emulators). Games that have been fixed and patched to get over problems inherent in emulation, such as randomisation elements not working in games when they are emulated (Impossible Mission, for example, failing to randomise the map for each new game). Remastered artwork, controls mapped to modern input devices. Doesn't have to be streaming - in line with Jon Burton's original idea for the service that I don't want to namedrop again, but I know you are alluding to. (He made a Gamehut video about this original concept a while back, but he's taken it down, presumably due to the huge amount of hate it generated in the comments from people who really, really don't like streaming).

The challenge would be getting the rights to the games - but as we've seen from Evercade, the-service-that-shall-not-be-named, countless cheap third-party mini-consoles, etc, its far from impossible if you get dedicated people with good connections on the job.   

 

Also - the age rating thing Lorfarius mentioned isn't that huge of a hurdle. Mostly these games are re-releases so they are either already certified, and some (iirc) are exempt, due to age. 

As an aside I've got quite a few funny stories about checking old games for compliance and certification issues, and dealing with regulators. Some of the stuff that seemed very harmless back then but is enough to warrant an age-restriction now, such as any depiction of smoking or drinking (rendering lots of text adventures and arcade adventures from the speccy/c64 days as subject to restrictions now), and things like women "wearing revealing clothing in inappropriate situations, i.e wearing a bikini into battle", which makes the arcade classic Athena, and tons of other 80s Japanese arcade stuff,  technically restricted products. Germany is the toughest market and I've got a huge list certificates for games we had to get rated before we could exhibit at Gamescom, there are some real surprises there. 

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8 minutes ago, Swainy said:

Remember that Blaze already tried something like that way back in 2012 and it failed pretty badly: https://www.eurogamer.net/articles/df-hardware-gamegadget-review

I didn't remember that at all, thanks. 

Interesting that Sega was lined up right from the start, that means they spent a lot of money to get some big names on there at launch. Sega will license their catalogue to anyone who wants it, but they want a hefty fee up-front. 

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Ah yes the game gadget, so much wasted potential. In hindsight it reminds me of game room on live arcade. That had the potential to be brilliant (it’s why we put it on the cover) but the promised extra licences never appeared, the game releases dried up and it died.

 

My understanding is that this is a different blaze to the blaze of old. They certainly weren’t happy when I mentioned Game Gadget to them :lol:

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When you do the firmware update does it give you the option to switch back to the old style?

I only ask because Namco clearly made Blaze map Libble Rabble properly so if you do the update, while games like Renegade and Double Dragon 2 will be fine, Libble Rabble will be pretty unplayable.

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23 minutes ago, strider said:

When you do the firmware update does it give you the option to switch back to the old style?

I only ask because Namco clearly made Blaze map Libble Rabble properly so if you do the update, while games like Renegade and Double Dragon 2 will be fine, Libble Rabble will be pretty unplayable.

 

Pretty sure you can choose the firmware as a file so you should be able to revert to the old one as they are both up on the site.

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5 minutes ago, Lorfarius said:

 

Pretty sure you can choose the firmware as a file so you should be able to revert to the old one as they are both up on the site.

That's potentially useful. The sooner they get proper mapping sorted the better. The entire layout is a testament that you shouldn't leave your decision making to the public.

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1 minute ago, Dudley said:

Yeah I'm going "Better the devil I know" until I have full customisation, although exactly how that'll work across multiple carts I'm not sure and possibly neither are they :P

Yeah it's rather ugly but it will at least solve issues. Although all the in-game info is going to be wrong as well.

I was chatting with @Sketch about this at the weekend and I don't think we came up with a completely viable option between us. I think the best John came up with was using a number system instead. It ultimately requires a large amount of work though that they're unlikely to have the budget for.

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