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Do you think the next generation needs new IP? Will it have any?


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It feels to me like this gen we’ve got less big new IP, especially from third parties. Ubisoft are still leading with AC like they did all last gen, but the generation before that Prince of Persia was their big franchise. I guess maybe Watchdogs underperforming affected that. It seems like a lot of the big franchises this generation were carried over from last gen, with COD still being probably the biggest game in the world.

 

Is this a problem? Do new consoles need new IP? Will the new consoles push any? I’m guessing that technically the giant number of games will mean that this gen had more new IP than ever before, but it definitely seems to me there’s less new triple A franchises this generation. 

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I know I'm not representative but think I'm at the point that for 'big' games I'm happy with Nintendo putting out a few of their known games, with new twists, every few years.

 

I'm not really into shooters or the big GTA/Ubisoft kitchen sink games so got no interest in that space.

 

New IP is far more interesting to me now in smaller experimental and most importantly cheaper indie style games.

 

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46 minutes ago, labarte said:

I still live in hope that Naughty Dog are going to do the rumoured space game. The Dig meets Uncharted would be fine by me.


Savage Starlight would be nice, yeah.
It's rumoured that Sony's new San Diego studio will take over Uncharted, so it's likely ND will work on new IP next.

I think there will be many new IP. This gen wasn't lacking in them, it's just that many of them weren't big enough to trigger a new franchise (Sunset Overdrive, Quantum Break, The Order, Anthem etc.) or the dev seem more interested in doing new stuff. From Software is the best example of this. They've made Bloodborne, Déraciné, Sekiro and are now working on Elden Ring, all new IP.

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For all their occasional quirks I admire Platinum’s ability to continue developing new ideas - we’ve had Astral Chain recently, Babylon’s Fall is in development and they’re not afraid to do more ambitious things like Nier Automata - an existing property for Square but a new direction for PG :) I’m sure they’ll be introducing more new things for next-gen...

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I mean, plus ça change? Big publishers putting out endless sequels and spin-offs with the occasional attempt at something new (e.g. this year we've had such 'delights' as Apex Legends and Anthem) has been the norm since at least the '90s.

 

It's perhaps more obvious now thanks to the increased development time of games, the fact that there are ever more pre-existing series to work with, and the fact that even disparate series are starting to feel somewhat homogeneous (see e.g. every AAA Sony exclusive bar Bloodborne in the past decade being some variant of "cinematic action adventure"). 

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New IP is important to me which is why I'm a relatively loyal PlayStation buyer. In my experience there have always been fresh new games there, in many cases even AA or AAA. Days Gone, Uncharted, Last of Us, Horizon Zero Dark, ICO, SotC etc. 

So I hope for more new IP with PS5. 

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The indie explosion is where you can get both new IP and new gaming concepts. 

 

AAA is pretty unimaginative, because it has huge budgets and has to turn huge profits.

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21 hours ago, GamesGamesGames said:

There's surely been more indie IP this gen than any other, hasn't there? Certainly feels like more stuff is released. Or is this a definition of IP only as one that has shown itself to be franchised?

 

16 hours ago, Isaac said:

The indie explosion is where you can get both new IP and new gaming concepts. 

 

AAA is pretty unimaginative, because it has huge budgets and has to turn huge profits.


This is pretty much why I qualified triple A at the end. There’s definitely more games than ever before, most are indies and they are more likely to be new IP. But it’s felt to me like this generation the giant publishers have released less new things and even more bloody sequels.

 

It’s an interesting point about Sunset Overdrive, Quantum Break et al. Maybe the issue is that this generations new IP has just been shite.

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New triple A games this gen have been incredibly stale, too safe and too geared towards appealing to the mass market gamer. I don't want to play the same game in slightly different clothes just because that style of game has become fashionable or reviews well.

 

Hopefully next gen will spawn some new experiences and less reliance on following a dated formula. Thankfully with the recent studio aquisitions it looks like devs finally have full creative freedom going forward so we might see some new concepts arise. I get a feeling the next seven years will be more way more expansive than the previous.

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I think a major part of the problem has been that increased dev tones weren’t accounted for when desperately chasing trends. In previous generations, a big game came out and then the other publishers could be ripping it off within the year. Now, with four or five year development cycles you get these bizarre situations where a bunch of Overwatch clones all turned up around the same time, long after the excitement that maybe hero shooters would be a thing had ended. There was a ridiculously long time where people on console could only play fortnite to try BR, which the world seemed to think was the big new genre. In fairness they got a few more of them out pretty fast, but it seems like the old model of just imitating whatever is popular doesn’t work as well when games take five years but early access lets people try new concepts immediately.

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Triple A franchises are like Marvel movies, the whole point is that you don’t have to come up with a new idea, development pipeline etc. So as a general principle you’re not going to see many new ones over time unless one has burned out completely and needs replacing.
 

A launch window was traditionally a good opportunity for publishers to take a chance on something new, because usually a limited launch software range helped them stand out, because new console capabilities could be linked to the IP, because the new console features could be risked on something other than the golden goose, etc.
 

I don’t see the same benefits in this generational shift, given the familiar input method, lack of significant changes in the way the platforms work, and the near certainty of cross-generational releases become the norm. So this time I don’t think the motivation is there for publishers to roll out a new AAA property.
 

That’s not to say we won’t see some, just that it won’t be so strongly related to the fact that there’s a new console generation.

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1 hour ago, Broker said:

 


This is pretty much why I qualified triple A at the end. There’s definitely more games than ever before, most are indies and they are more likely to be new IP. But it’s felt to me like this generation the giant publishers have released less new things and even more bloody sequels.

 

It’s an interesting point about Sunset Overdrive, Quantum Break et al. Maybe the issue is that this generations new IP has just been shite.

 

Take that back right now, Sunset Overdrive was a great game :)

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I don't understand why Astro Bot hasn't become the Playstation poster boy yet. Considering how they went all in on Sackboy, and how universally loved Rescue Mission is, it seems like an obvious choice for a flagship IP brand. 

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8 hours ago, HarryBizzle said:

Ubisoft get rubbished for their open world games but I struggle to think of a publisher which has put out more new IP than them this generation.

Copy and paste doesn’t take as long . 

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9 hours ago, Darwock said:

I don't understand why Astro Bot hasn't become the Playstation poster boy yet. Considering how they went all in on Sackboy, and how universally loved Rescue Mission is, it seems like an obvious choice for a flagship IP brand. 

 

Because he's only on VR.

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Both Nintendo and Microsoft have very heavily pushed indies the past few years. Is it meant to be some kind of weird point in Sony's favour that they barely bother showcasing them anymore? 

 

As for the question, I disagree with Alex and think we'll see more new IP in the next couple of years. The first couple of years of a new generation's life is the perfect time to launch new IP. You have millions of new console owners hungry to buy games to play on their new system and they'll often resort to buying any old tat to justify it. If you can release a solid/good new IP during that window when things are new and shiny and there's not a lot of competition it's probably the best chance you have of gaining traction. New IPs just don't really get the same amount of traction later in the gen, historically, although of course there are exceptions if they're, well, exceptional (The Last of Us).

 

I bet something like Control, for example, would have garnered a lot more interest had it released 6 months into the new gen positioning itself as a rock solid next gen showcase than as a shakily performing end of gen title even if the only real difference was a more solid frame rate and ray tracing. A lot of it's just psychological behaviour.

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