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Droo

Games that sit at the peak of each generation graphically.

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Shadow of the Colossus on PS2 seemed pretty amazing to me at the time, despite a few places where textures would warp in front of your eyes as you approached them...

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11 hours ago, ulala said:

 

The SNES and NES games that use enhancement chips, like Super FX 2, should not be included - of course they have great graphics, because they have a chip on the cart thats more powerful than the processor in the console!

 

/rant 

 

 

 


 

The Nes/Famicom carts had MMC mapper chips to enhance a huge number of games. 
...any of these you want to discount for, reasons? 
 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memory_management_controller

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3 hours ago, Triple A said:

used the Super FX chip.

So? The cartridge still goes into a stock Super NES/Super Famicom console as any other game for the system. And criticising a Super NES game for using onboard processors, well, you might as well criticise it for not coming on DVD-ROM or not having online gameplay or whatever... That’s just the nature of that specific console.

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Bearing in mind that this is wildly subjective (and that I'm opting for "best looking" rather than "most technically impressive", not least as I lack the expertise to judge the latter), my highlights:

 

8-bit home computers: Lords of Midnight

EGA PC: Loom, Future Wars

8-bit consoles/16-bit home computers: Another World, Phantasy Star

VGA PC: Doom, TIE Fighter

16-bit consoles: Shining Force, Thunderforce IV

SVGA PC: Little Big Adventure 2, TFX

32-bit consoles: Panzer Dragoon Saga, Wipeout 2097

64-bit consoles: nothing to see here

3DFX-era PC: Homeworld, Unreal

Dreamcast-Xbox era consoles: Ico, Shenmue (though this was a hard one: very honourable mentions to Jet Set Radio, Metroid Prime, Panzer Dragoon Orta, Rez, Shadow of the Colossus, Soul Calibur and Wind Waker)

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10 hours ago, ulala said:

 

Not so sure about that. at the time i played starfox, there was nothing like it on any other home system.

Well, X-Wing for a start. ;)

 

...

 

 

There's definitely a sweet spot where hardware is being used efficiently but this hasn't yet led to the temptation to overload it with extra framerate-killing junk. Metroid Prime and SoulCalibur are good shouts. Dynamite Headdy. Quake and Dungeon Keeper on DOS. GTA:CW on the DS. I think SOTC gets a pass in spite of the chuggy framerate because it's implementing some effects that wouldn't be commonplace until well into the next hardware gen.

 

I only recently saw there was a port of Road Rash for the Master System, it's surprisingly close to the MD version.

 

Astral Chain on Switch?

 

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OK, how about handhelds?

 

GB - X: 3D graphics  on the original Game Boy.

 

 

 

GBC - Shantae: They actually had to cut down the script to put more sprites on the screen.

 

 

GBA - Simpsons Road Rage: Developed by licensed game assembly line Altron.

 

 

DS - Metroid Prime Hunters: I'm not a fan, but it's certainly impressive graphically.

 

 

GG - Tempo Jr.: The easy answer might be "Treasure games," but this looks impressive. 

 

 

PSP - Monster Hunter Portable 3rd: This is where it starts to get boring, but the PSP certainly had graphically impressive games.

 

 

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9 hours ago, Cool Ben said:

Sorry to be so vague here, there was a game that released with with either the original xbox, 360 or maybe the PS2 that was graphically amazing.  It was a driving type game and I remember crashing through the streets with debris flying everywhere. I want to say crazy taxi but i think that was only Sega, but it was similar. Even though it was one of the first games out, nothing came close to looking as good for a long time.

 

What was that game?

Midtown Madness 3 or Wreckless, are my guesses.
 

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8 hours ago, Protocol Penguin said:

So? The cartridge still goes into a stock Super NES/Super Famicom console as any other game for the system. And criticising a Super NES game for using onboard processors, well, you might as well criticise it for not coming on DVD-ROM or not having online gameplay or whatever... That’s just the nature of that specific console.

 

Well im going to count the mega cd and 32x in "megadrive" then - thats just the "nature of the specific console". 

 

Super FX games have a processor running at 21 Mhz, thats 7 times faster than the stock snes CPU.

 

I'm saying that its unfair to compare them to snes games that are running on a 3Mhz processor - like Donkey Kong Country.

 

 

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10 minutes ago, Droo said:

Outrun on the 360 was fairly impressive. Pretty sure it could run in 720p too. 

 

Outrun was great on the original xbox too!

 

Burnout 3 was great on PS2 and Xbox

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58 minutes ago, ulala said:

 

Well im going to count the mega cd and 32x in "megadrive" then - thats just the "nature of the specific console". 

 

Super FX games have a processor running at 21 Mhz, thats 7 times faster than the stock snes CPU.

 

I'm saying that its unfair to compare them to snes games that are running on a 3Mhz processor - like Donkey Kong Country.

 

 

None of the Super FX games are beautiful. They are the very earliest attempts at 3D console graphics. I’m not the biggest fan of DKC but think it’s better looking than Starfox!

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41 minutes ago, ulala said:

 

Outrun was great on the original xbox too!

 

Burnout 3 was great on PS2 and Xbox

 

Doh!  I meant to say original xbox. 

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43 minutes ago, ulala said:

 

Outrun was great on the original xbox too!

 

Burnout 3 was great on PS2 and Xbox

 

To be fair the Outrun 2 arcade machine used Xbox based hardware so it was always gonna be pretty close same as the DC/Naomi stuff

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57 minutes ago, acidbearboy said:

None of the Super FX games are beautiful. They are the very earliest attempts at 3D console graphics. I’m not the biggest fan of DKC but think it’s better looking than Starfox!

 

I dunno, i quite like the large polygons of Star Fox. They were exceptional and very impressive at the time.

 

Of the two, DKC suits this thread better, as its running on stock hardware.

 

I remember when it came out, and simply could not believe it was running on the SNES. Its not just the pre-rendered graphics that are stunning, but its use of colour trickery and various graphical techniques used throughout. The lighting in some of the stages, still amazing to this day.

 

 

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On 09/12/2019 at 19:59, Droo said:

Was thinking about this recently:  I don’t have any examples off hand so mainly hoping to hear the forums thoughts on the matter. 

 

Im guessing that the most graphically impressive games will come very late in any generation, and almost certainly as they’re dovetailing into the subsequent generation. 

 

So here's a question, do you mean games released during the commercial life time?

 

Because for CPC I could absolutely suggest Pinball Fantasies.

 

But that was released this year.

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14 hours ago, ulala said:


it has its own processor, so hardly pushing the SNES .

 

what other games had pre rendered graphics?

 

We are talking about games that sit on the peak of each system/generation so they need to be mentioned at least. 

 

DKC was definitely one of those that blew me away and about 7 or 8 years ago or so I remember playing it again on an emulator and really being impressed with that snow bit again how it builds up the layers and looks amazing. On release it was one I’ll never forget. I had a similar feel with Yoshi’s Island and loved. 

 

Pre rendered games you say on the SNES Ulala?

well DKC was my fav of all of them but Mario RPG was all over that too. Toy Story had it too.

 

Earth Worm Jim was another impressive game on the Snes. 

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12 minutes ago, Colonel Panic said:

Mario RPG uses an SA-1 chip so it doesn’t suit ulala’s unsolicited criteria! :lol:

 

SA1 chip:

10.74 MHz clock speed, compared to the 5A22's maximum of 3.58 MHz

Faster RAM, including 2KBytes of internal RAM

Memory mapping capabilities

Limited data storage and compression

New DMA modes such as bitmap to bit plane transfer

Arithmetic functions (multiplication, division, and cumulative)

Hardware timer (either as a linear 18-bit timer, or synchronised with the PPU to generate an IRQ at a specific H/V scanline location)

 

It's not a snes ;)

 

Nintendo were using enhancement chips quite early in the life of the SNES, 1991 in Pilotwings! And of course in 1992 with Super Mario Kart, which could not run on a stock SNES.

 

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I'm not sure how you can say enhancement chips are not allowed, when they were a stock consideration on the SNES (and can only enhance the games so much), but Donkey Kong Country, a game using pre-rendered graphics (so graphics literally rendered on vastly more powerful hardware, then ported to the SNES game as bitmaps) is fine?

 

That's slightly weird logic for me.

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I always thought Elite on the NES was pretty impressive - I mean, it's not the prettiest game out there, but even wireframe polygons on that machine seemed impossible! And it's arguably the best 8-bit Elite out there too!

 

Star Fox would probably tip it on the SNES for me if enhancement chips are allowed. Options are pretty limited if not... Super Mario World always looked amazing though and that's a launch title! Contra III was another great-looking SNES title and I don't think that used any kind of enhancement... though there is some Mode 7 in there.

 

The Master System had technically excellent ports of Road Rash, as someone mentioned earlier, and Golden Axe.

 

Contra Hard Corps is pretty spectacular on the Megadrive. Sonic 3 is pretty fine looking!

 

As much as I loved Panzer Dragoon Saga, I'd probably say Panzer Dragoon Zwei was the better looking title. I think it's on-rails nature gave space for extra graphical trickery. Burning Rangers was technically brilliant, but looked a bit of an ugly mess in practice.

 

Wipeout 3 was my favourite looking PS1 title. I really don't think that game gets enough praise.

 

I always figured Soul Calibur was generally considered the best looking Dreamcast title, although there were a lot of good-looking games on that system in it's all-too-short life.

 

Otogi or Panzer Dragoon Orta would probably be my pick on the original Xbox, and I guess Snake Eater on the PS2. As others have mentioned though, GTA San Andreas was another technically brilliant title for the hardware, but not the best looking game on the system.

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21 minutes ago, Zio said:

I'm not sure how you can say enhancement chips are not allowed, when they were a stock consideration on the SNES (and can only enhance the games so much), but Donkey Kong Country, a game using pre-rendered graphics (so graphics literally rendered on vastly more powerful hardware, then ported to the SNES game as bitmaps) is fine?

 

That's slightly weird logic for me.


your logic is amazing (ly bad) :)
 

if dkc was running on silicon graphics workstations that were Frankenstein’d up to a snes you may have a point.

 

but weren’t most console graphics ( and sound and programming) done using pcs and then ported in those days?

 

 

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If you could buy it from a shop, stick it into a SNES and play it, then I'd say it counts as a SNES game. It's not like they were sticking a 3D accelerator card and a hard drive in the cart.

 

I mean, where do you stop with this? Would an Amiga game be ineligible if it required 1mb of memory?

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Kawasaki Super Bikes does a really good job of persuading the MD to push out Virtual Racing style graphics without the need for an extra chip.

 

 

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1 hour ago, K said:

If you could buy it from a shop, stick it into a SNES and play it, then I'd say it counts as a SNES game. It's not like they were sticking a 3D accelerator card and a hard drive in the cart.

 

I mean, where do you stop with this? Would an Amiga game be ineligible if it required 1mb of memory?

 

or you added a second cpu that was 7 times faster that what it shipped with?

 

 

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6 hours ago, acidbearboy said:

They are the very earliest attempts at 3D console graphics.

 

I mean, they're not. There are almost certainly even earlier examples of polygonal 3D graphics on home consoles, but the earliest that springs to mind is Star Cruiser on the MegaDrive (1990):

 

 

(there's also Hard Drivin' on the same console from 1991, but that's such a catastrophe of a game I'd be embarrassed to put it forward) 

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