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Copyright strikes on Retro game Youtube vids - Paul Andrews?

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44 minutes ago, Dudley said:

 

I've read it again and the only possible other thing you're saying there was no commercial value in retro gaming before 5 years ago.

 

Which is still just hilarious in its wrong.

It’s amazingly obvious bullshit.


By 1995 Activision had already released a compilation of Atari VCS games, and even the Super Famicom was getting retro compilations released for it (Caravan Shooting Collection, Nichibutsu Arcade Classics, etc). 1995 was also a year that retro gaming fanzines and websites were already a thing, and Retrogames (the mail order shop turned website) was already up and running. Retro gaming is almost a quarter of a century old, both as a commercial trend and a fan/amateur endeavour.

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Look, if someone doesn't understand the difference between Retro Gaming, "Retro Gaming", Retro Gaming and retroGaming then they obviously don't have the literacy levels required to parse the finer points of whatever the fuck is being said here.

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21 minutes ago, Camel said:

 

I'm struggling with it tbh. Can you explain more clearly what it is that began five years ago?

 

It is really that impenetrable? I'm saying "Retro Gaming" - as mainstream concept, not simply the hobby of retro-gaming, only emerged in the five or so years, fuelled by men who had computers as 10 year olds in the early 80's entering their 40's with much more disposable income. In turn, that had the effect of creating a perception that there was "value" in "retro" which has led to the likes of Andrews and others buying up various ip's.

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2 minutes ago, Fry Crayola said:

"Retro Gaming" didn't exist until five years ago. For over ten years, Retro Gamer never sold a single copy.

 

and at that time how much people selling old computers for, if they didn't simply put them in the bin?

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5 minutes ago, MajorRob said:

 

It is really that impenetrable? I'm saying "Retro Gaming" - as mainstream concept, not simply the hobby of retro-gaming, only emerged in the five or so years, fuelled by men who had computers as 10 year olds in the early 80's entering their 40's with much more disposable income. In turn, that had the effect of creating a perception that there was "value" in "retro" which has led to the likes of Andrews and others buying up various ip's.

 

This happened in 2014? Really?

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7 minutes ago, MajorRob said:

 

and at that time how much people selling old computers for, if they didn't simply put them in the bin?

 

I'd have to fish out old issues of the magazine (they discussed sale prices regularly) to get a figure on that, which - given they're naturally at the bottom of the pile, and the pile is over ten miles away - I'm not really going to do.

 

But from memory, it hasn't been an order of magnitude leap. 

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8 minutes ago, MajorRob said:

 

and at that time how much people selling old computers for, if they didn't simply put them in the bin?

Mate, there were things in the old days (like the dark ages of 1997) called “computer fairs”. Orics, C64s, Atari 800s, you name it, people bought and actively collected the hardware and software at these events. And paid actual money for them.

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24 minutes ago, MajorRob said:

 

It is really that impenetrable? I'm saying "Retro Gaming" - as mainstream concept, not simply the hobby of retro-gaming, only emerged in the five or so years, fuelled by men who had computers as 10 year olds in the early 80's entering their 40's with much more disposable income. In turn, that had the effect of creating a perception that there was "value" in "retro" which has led to the likes of Andrews and others buying up various ip's.

 

Jerry Ellsworth's C64 plug and play stick came out in 2004 and it was selling tens of thousands of unit a day on QVC in the US. Doesn't get much more mainstream than that.

 

Unless you only mean specifically the buying and selling of actual old home computers, in which case, just because we're in a price bubble now, that doesn't mean there wasn't a "scene" or a sense of "value" before then.

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9 minutes ago, K said:

 

This happened in 2014? Really?


As soon as the bells of 2013 faded, there it was: a Cinderella  style transformation for Jupiter Ace and all his other retro chums

 

”You shall go the ball, Oric 1”

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1 minute ago, Protocol Penguin said:

Yer actual fanzines from the Space Year 1995. Proprietor even bought and sold old games hardware as a sideline.

 

As a side note - a 1995 fanzine discussing the Atari 2600 is akin to getting all misty eyed thinking about the Xbox 360, in terms of the time gap. Fuck, I feel old.

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Before that it was all retro reading, retro music, and retro films, as far as the eye could see... died off though. No money in it anymore. 30 years man and boy. Til I did my back in...

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9 minutes ago, Protocol Penguin said:

Yer actual fanzines from the Space Year 1995. Proprietor even bought and sold old games hardware and software as a sideline.
0703FC8E-B845-4C83-80CF-D1702E2A05E6.thumb.jpeg.42c2f6525db1aee575a65e8c476e78ad.jpeg

 

That was a great fanzine.

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32 minutes ago, Fry Crayola said:

 

I'd have to fish out old issues of the magazine (they discussed sale prices regularly) to get a figure on that, which - given they're naturally at the bottom of the pile, and the pile is over ten miles away - I'm not really going to do.

 

But from memory, it hasn't been an order of magnitude leap. 

 

Retro Price Listings, Issue 20, March 2006:

 

48k Spectrum - £35

48k Spectrum+ - £10

128k Spectrum - £40

Spectrum 128k+3 - £40

CD32 - £25

Sam Coupe - £50

Archimedes - £30

BBC Micro - £15

Original Gameboy - £5

N64 - £10

 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Protocol Penguin said:

It’s amazingly obvious bullshit.


By 1995 Activision had already released a compilation of Atari VCS games, and even the Super Famicom was getting retro compilations released for it (Caravan Shooting Collection, Nichibutsu Arcade Classics, etc). 1995 was also a year that retro gaming fanzines and websites were already a thing, and Retrogames (the mail order shop turned website) was already up and running. Retro gaming is almost a quarter of a century old, both as a commercial trend and a fan/amateur endeavour.

I wrote a "history of retro gaming" infographic for an event we appeared at last year. 

I chose the inclusion of Space Invaders on the loading screen for the PS1 conversion of Ridge Racer as the "birth of retro" , as it probably (might ) have been the first time a mainstream gaming audience was introduced to the concept of re-playing old games, for fun. 

I mean, it doesn't entirely work - I was emulating (very badly) Spectrum games on my Amiga at least a couple of years before that. And I'm sure there were Usenet groups that had been going since the Atari VCS days, where the spirit of the VCS and Intellivision were still very much alive. But if you have to draw a line in the sand to say where the current Retro scene started - 1995 and Ridge Racer is good enough for me. 

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We could point out that was was 13 years ago , not the 5 you claim but I am not sure there would be much point.

 

Your assertion is incorrect - retro gaming was mainstream 5 years ago and probably ten years ago.

 

Actual original 8 bit computer games hardware prices have changed in last 15 years as you have proved - but that doesn't make the point you think it does because the "mainstream" of retro gaming is certainly NOT original hardware.

 

Also businessmen like Andrews are not buying up original IP to tap into people buying old computer hardware. I am not sure who he is planning to sell the Jupiter Ace to but he must have plans as he has stopped the distribution of the rom that enables emulation!

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6 minutes ago, Anne Summers said:

I chose the inclusion of Space Invaders on the loading screen for the PS1 conversion of Ridge Racer as the "birth of retro"

 

Maybe the birth of people being wrong about retro. :P

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The amiga had speccy and c64 emulators in the late 80s.

 

And wasn't it galaxians on Ridge Racer?

 

EDIT - and Tekken - it was tekken I actually remembered it from.

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Interesting (when I say interesting I mean pathetic) post from Chinnyvision.

 

Accusing people of basically making hacking attempts on his account.

 

Or alternatively, maybe he was told by twitter to delete certain offensive tweets he made.... 

B5367718-55F6-4CC5-B6DD-456C5F747469.jpeg

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All this talk of retro gaming being a big thing is interesting. While the five year debate is obviously rather untrue, a lot of stuff has happened in the last decade that highlights just how commercial retro gaming has now become. Mini consoles, games being released on old hardware, events, kickstarter books and just a few examples. We've actually done a piece on this very thing for the next issue. Retro gaming has been around for years as has already been pointed out, but it's certainly picked up a lot of steam this past decade.

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26 minutes ago, Anne Summers said:

I wrote a "history of retro gaming" infographic for an event we appeared at last year. 

I chose the inclusion of Space Invaders on the loading screen for the PS1 conversion of Ridge Racer as the "birth of retro" , as it probably (might ) have been the first time a mainstream gaming audience was introduced to the concept of re-playing old games, for fun. 

I mean, it doesn't entirely work - I was emulating (very badly) Spectrum games on my Amiga at least a couple of years before that. And I'm sure there were Usenet groups that had been going since the Atari VCS days, where the spirit of the VCS and Intellivision were still very much alive. But if you have to draw a line in the sand to say where the current Retro scene started - 1995 and Ridge Racer is good enough for me. 

1994 and Galaxian, but bloody good point; even if I personally wouldn’t put that as a year zero for retro gaming. Still, in retrospect (hah) it was a very strong statement for Namco to place a ‘legacy’ game on the loading screen of the PlayStation’s premier launch title.

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6 minutes ago, strider said:

All this talk of retro gaming being a big thing is interesting. While the five year debate is obviously rather untrue, a lot of stuff has happened in the last decade that highlights just how commercial retro gaming has now become. Mini consoles, games being released on old hardware, events, kickstarter books and just a few examples. We've actually done a piece on this very thing for the next issue. Retro gaming has been around for years as has already been pointed out, but it's certainly picked up a lot of steam this past decade.

 

Exactly what I said! Maybe 7 or 8 rather than 5 years, but it feels like five to me.

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4 hours ago, maryliddon said:

 

I agree that they would sell it if they owned it and someone was willing to pay money.

 

They're saying they didn't.

 

Now there is a chance, a realistic one, that they're not aware they sold Horace specifically as it could have been part of a bundle deal (Say all of Beam's intellectual properties). I've asked if that's the case.

 

I'm also very aware that I'm probably wearing the patience very thin of the contact I have in Atari. Can't guarantee I'll get a response

 

 

It looks like Subvert have bought almost everything else that's original IP that isn't already bought up by Piko. So yes, I think it's a general, sweeping contract.

 

Melbourne House:

 

Quote

 The Horace series (and character), Penetrator, Terror-Daktil 4D, the Mugsy series, the Videopac series (many titles to include Air-Sea War, Battle, Race, Spin Out, Cryptogram, etc. etc.), the Voyeur series, the Mystic Midway series, International Tennis Open, Castle of Terror, Dark Tower, Hellfire, Fighting Warrior, Doc the Destroyer, Terrormolinos, Sir Lancelot , Grand Larceny , Knuckle Busters, Dodgy Geezers, Alien Gate, Kether, Gearheads, Gyroscope, Starion, Hampstead, Arkham manor, Mordons quest, 

 

Ocean:

Quote

Armageddon, Robotics, Caterpilla, Match Day Series, Pud Pud, Moon Alert, Gillagens Gold, Cavelon, Nomad, Mutants, Eskimo Eddie, Chinese Juggler, Phantom Club, Jonny and the Jimpys, Cosmic Wartoad, Lost Patrol, Starshot, Battle command, Gift from the gods

 

Although like I posted previously, the focus is definitely on Spectrum games which makes me think he's planning on a Spectrum version of The C64 (mini or not).  

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29 minutes ago, Clipper said:

The amiga had speccy and c64 emulators in the late 80s.

 

And wasn't it galaxians on Ridge Racer?

 

EDIT - and Tekken - it was tekken I actually remembered it from.

 

Well exactly, it's been so long as it was mainstream that the patent on that loading screen has expired.

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12 minutes ago, strider said:

All this talk of retro gaming being a big thing is interesting. While the five year debate is obviously rather untrue, a lot of stuff has happened in the last decade that highlights just how commercial retro gaming has now become. Mini consoles, games being released on old hardware, events, kickstarter books and just a few examples. We've actually done a piece on this very thing for the next issue. Retro gaming has been around for years as has already been pointed out, but it's certainly picked up a lot of steam this past decade.

 

Nostalgia is a hugely powerful emotional draw, especially nowadays. I think a lot of people thought the bubble would burst at some point (not just talking games either) but tbh, I think it'll keep growing. Yoyo'ing between plateaus and jumps, as each subsequent generation (trends/hipster chic etc) looks back.

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2 hours ago, K said:

It's heartwarming to see rllmuk become a shelter for beefs from elsewhere on the internet that are looking for a home.


Beef-nardo’s Home

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17 minutes ago, strider said:

All this talk of retro gaming being a big thing is interesting. While the five year debate is obviously rather untrue, a lot of stuff has happened in the last decade that highlights just how commercial retro gaming has now become. Mini consoles, games being released on old hardware, events, kickstarter books and just a few examples. We've actually done a piece on this very thing for the next issue. Retro gaming has been around for years as has already been pointed out, but it's certainly picked up a lot of steam this past decade.

 

Not so sure about this personally.

 

Mini consoles - the Atari Flashback came out in 2004. The C64DTV in the same year. 

Games being released on old hardware - has this ever really stopped? The GBA version of Activision Anthology (2003) contains homebrew Atari 2600 games.

Events - I remember attending a retro gaming event in Croydon's Fairfield Halls sometime in the early 2000s. No small thing. eg, Archer Maclean, Billy Mitchell and Doris Self were there.
 

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