Jump to content
rllmuk
Gordzilla

Your most disappointing films..

Recommended Posts

Pacific Rim: Uprising / Independence Day: Resurgence; for similar reasons.

Star Wars: The Phantom Menace / The Last Jedi

The Hobbit films (although I've subsequently warmed to them, slightly).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not one that hugely looks forward to moves as I only watch Harry Potter ones on repeat..

 

But, films I haven't enjoyed anywhere near as much as I was lead to believe I should are:

 

Guardians of the Galaxy: found it extremely boring and no amount of 80s nostalgia can levitate it. 

 

John Wick 2: more of the same but less of the thrill of how fresh the first felt. 

 

American Pie 2: didn't touch the original although had some good moments. 

 

Due to the sheer amount of CGI use as superhero movies, I have quite low expectations nowadays on a personal level so rarely get disappointed. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched Blade Runner about nine years ago after hearing so much about it for as long as I could remember. It didn't grab me at all – the tone, plotting and ambiguous ending I could all live with, but it just felt cold, uncaptivating. The most entertainment value I got was identifying the 'inspiration' for so many films, games and TV shows that had ripped off the visual style and elements of the setting. I know there are deeper subtexts to the film, but going in cold on my first (and so far only) viewing, it just went over my head. I didn't get the feeling "I should've watched this years ago" as I did with Alien a couple of months previous to that. I guess that I owe it another rewatch and reassess...

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's well worth giving Blade Runner a second watch. For me it elevated it from a "meh" on first viewing to being one of my favourite films, although there was a gap of several years between those viewings.

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first two Andrew Haigh films are just great, I was getting really excited for him as the next big underappreciated writer/director, then he went and made Lean on Pete which absolutely HONKS. 

 

Spoiler

I wasn’t even sad when the horse died.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spiderman 3. A movie that promises so much, the Venom suit, the Sandman and the Hobgoblin. I was so ready for that, the epic fights, Spiderman falling victim to his dark impulses, then a fight against the venom suit, then there is his one time friend now enemy and a shape changing giant. Will spidey need to succumb to the power of the symbiote, will he take revenge against the man who killed his beloved uncle, will there be redemption for Harry Osborn? There was so much potential, and what we got was a relationship drama with his bloody mrs.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Road. The book is breathtaking and one of my all time favourite post-apocalyptic novels. I love Cormac McCarthy. The film isn't actually that bad but like American Psycho, it doesn't go far enough. There is a horrific scene in the novel that is cut out entirely in the screenplay. Cannibalism is only really hinted at in the film. The dialogue in the book is very sparse yet the screenplay seems to pepper every scene with dialogue; it's a film and it needs dialogue but then, the Revenant doesn't do this. I didn't really like the changes the film made to the Mother character either.

American Psycho is a good film but Bateman is utterly charmless and depraved in the novel but almost an anti-hero in the film. The tone just feels off. I quite like the film but there are scenes in the book that again, just aren't there.

Perhaps filming The Road and American Psycho as straight adaptations was impossible due to censorship.  Amercian Psycho certainly suffers from that but the one scene in The road they omitted is probably the most powerfully horrific scene in the book.

 

A baby being roasted on a spit.

 

The Phantom Menace wins hands down though. Terrible stuff.  Overhyped cartoon nonsense.  Even Brian Blessed is rubbish in it :(

  • Downvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was gonna go with The Force Awakens. It's an ok film, but far from the second coming that the Internet thinks it is. It was not the brilliant awe inspiring SW comeback I was expecting. It's such a workmanlike  remake of Star Wars without the panache or sense of excitement. It also has an antagonist who was about as threatening as a bunny rabbit. Still. At least it didn't have Rose. 

 

but 2 people have already mentioned 2 films that are far worse

 

1- Highlander 2. I actually rewatched this a few months back, not having seen it since the cinema. Christ it is bad, an incredible disappointment after the first film. There are a few decent actions scenes however. 

 

2- The lost world,Jurassic Park. Possibly the worst sequel of all time, yet it has the same director and Pete Postlethwaite. It doesn't help that the plot is terrible and the kids are awful. I much prefer JP3.  

  • Upvote 1
  • Downvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GotG2 is up there for me. But I think The Matrix Sequels top the list. After the wonder and amazement of the first movie, the sequels were bloated.

 

i still maintain there’s an excellent two hour movie in there somewhere. Maybe one day Topher Grace will edit it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Snowpiercer. I loved Bong Joon-Ho’s Korean films, Memories Of Murder is one of my favourite films, and i read he was directing a sci fi about human transportation, and i saw a few photos and  it didn’t matter so much that this was his first English language film as i trusted his brilliance. I saw an early photo of Song Kang ho stood inside a container and it impressed on me an expectation of a sci fi that would be slow, deep, heavy, devastating, powerful. 

 

Then i saw the trailer and for much of it was in a state of denial. Then i watched the film and for 20 minutes clung on to a hope it’d improve. After 40 minutes i accepted this was just a comic book film. It hurt, a lot. I so wanted to see that sci fi, set on worn down space carriers, something about human transportation in a horrible dystopian totalitarian reality. Not an action film set on a train that amps up the absurdity.

 

The same thing happened with Gravity. I saw glimpses and imagined a sci fi horror with a chilling quietness, it’d be eerie and maybe even profound, a quality director at the helm. No it was just a rollercoaster ride.

 

I love Kim Jee Woon’s films as well, i think his directing of action is among the best in the world, a pure technician, so The Last Stand also hurt. Like the parent of a child who has committed murder you have to find ways to process the pain and confusion, the feeling nothing is going to be the same ever again. They’ve changed, everything has changed, you can’t go back.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just watched the Snowpiercer trailer to see where you were coming from and it sounds more like you made up a film in your head and were disappointed it wasn it. The trailer shows what it is, an action film about an uprising on a train set in a dystopian future. Which is what it is.

  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't like Spider-man : Homecoming. It hurts me to say it because i love spider-man in general.

 

I loved all the Tobey Maguire films, didnt really bother with the Andrew Garfield ones,  played a lot of spider-man games over the years, adored spider-verse, and even really enjoyed far from home.

 

There's something about homecoming that i cant really put my finger on though. I thought it was the involvement of Iron Man that did it, but as mentioned earlier, i liked Far from home, and he was referenced a lot in that.

 

I even really like Tom Holland as Spider-man, and i think he's probably the best one theres ever been.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Tree of Life. Every Malick film prior to it is a masterpiece and the trailer was so gorgeous it made me well up a bit. It's not total shit by any means but I thought it had one heavy foot in unintentional self-parody, with the staggeringly tedious To The Wonder marking the point where he jumped all the way in. I haven't dared watch any of the ones he's done since.

 

It still blows my mind that the critical reception to it was so rapturous when the incredible New World had pretty mixed reviews at the time.. I coudn't help but wonder if those two things were linked, critics trying to retrospectively right a bit of a wrong.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Live Free or Die Hard / Die Hard 4.0? A Good Day to Die Hard?

 

Maybe Die Hard With a Vengeance as well, but there's a certain ridiculousness to that one that I admire... :P  Also McClane still feels like an unfortunate cop in it, rather than a bald superhero...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How has Alien Covenant slid by without a mention here, I would love to detail everything that’s wrong with it but I just don’t have a spare 8 hours. 

 

As a huge Aliens fan I can forgive pretty much anything Alien related, don’t mind Alien 3, even Promethius which is far from perfect I took away good things, but Covenant, I was raging days after watching it.

 

Some of the film shows mentioned here are bad, but not “blow here” flute scene bad. 

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to add War Inc. The John Cusack movie that sort of acted like a sequel to Grosse Point Blank, but wasn't. 

 

Truly disappointing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Justice League.  I love Man of Steel and BvS (extended), but recognise why they're not everyone's cup of tea.

 

In a world where Marvel rule the day with light and fluffy superhero movies, I felt the DC movies were differentiating themselves well by being darker and taking themselves more seriously.  It suits their characters.

 

So for Justice League to be totally marvel-fied was hugely disappointing.  Snyder, for better or worse, had a vision and a plan, but that then got butchered by executives who thought it would be better to try and ape the competition.

 

Well, they got their comeuppance.  They doubled the cost of the movie with its reshoots and probably halved its box office.  Would've been a lot better if they'd just let the original vision play out.  It almost certainly wouldn't have pleased those who didn't like BvS, but that made nearly $900m at the box office so was far from a flop.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Phantom Menace

What's weird here is that I really enjoyed watching all three Prequels at the cinema (and I've since gone on to enjoy each of the sequels too), but there was a nagging feeling that, if I really did like the three prequels, why have I never watched them again on DVD?  Why do I have the 6 movie box-set and yet I've only ever sat and watched the three "proper" films?

 

It's with hindsight (and with the help of the awesome RedletterMedia reviews) that I see what is wrong with these films, and why they are such a disappointment after the event.  George Lucas never stood a chance - he had to make a film that was all things to all people, and it was bound to be a disappointment.  

 

The thing that really hits home for me is that the prequels and sequels desperately cling to the original films for their ideas. Obi Wan says "years ago, I fought with your father in the clone wars", a simple line that was surely written without any thought that a whole film would show us the clone wars 30 years later. The filmakers assume we want to see what the clone wars were, and we don't really have to because it already made sense in my head what that sentence meant, even if my 10 year old brain had counjoured up something completely incorrectly.

 

That's what I really liked about Star Wars -  when I was a kid, I was aware of the amount of language used that just plain didn't make any sense.  When Luke says he wanted to go to Toshi Station to pick up some power converters, we have no idea what Toshi Station is, the movie doesn't take us there later, and we can only imagine what Luke would need power converters for.  When Han Solo says the Falcon is the ship that made the Kessel Run in 12 parsecs, we have to imagine what that might mean.  We can judge from the response that he gets from Luke and Ben what the Kessel run might  be.  All the language in Star Wars points to this bigger world that we don't see, with everyone understanding what's being said, and the viewer also understands it in their own way.  Your brain fills in the gaps - some people might imagine Toshi Station as the space equivalent of a run down shack full of spare parts, others might think it's a massive futuristic city - we don't really dwell on it, but we have some sort of understanding of that world.

 

Except, the prequels and sequels come along and fill in those gaps for us.  We've see the Kessel Run in Solo, we know where it is, what it looks like. In creating the newer movies it seems that someone went through the original scripts and looked for any and all references they could expand upon.  They show you things that you thought you knew and don't need to see because in your mind you already knew what it was. I thought Stormtroopers were robots, and this made perfect sense across all three movies, yet in Episode 7 one of them takes off their helmet and it's just some guy inside. Now on rewatching the original movies my view is altered because they are all just people in shiny helmets now and I preferred them as emotionless robots.

 

For me, the Star Wars movies are now something I will still go and see at the cinema because they are a spectacle on the big screen and I enjoy the experience.  But none of them are films I will watch a second time at home, and the reason they are all so disappointing is the way that Star Wars is no longer a great film trilogy from my childhood, but a long, ongoing soap opera which will have hundreds of episodes, spin off tv shows, cartoons etc, all of which I really couldn't give a shit about.  I'll die one day and at that time the story will remain unfinished. These films tarnish the memory of that original great trilogy from my childhood, and whilst I still love the three original films they have lost some of their magic by being part of this bigger picture that I never wanted.

  • Upvote 4
  • Empathy 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 02/09/2019 at 12:51, SpagMasterSwift said:

The Lord Of The Rings: The Two Towers

 

WAT?  I think I partially get your meaning.  Fellowship is an almost perfect encapsulation of the world, the characters, the quest itself.  

 

But TTT has Helms Deep, Gandalf Vs. Balrog, the Riders of Rohan...

 

RotK was the duffer in the trilogy, if there is one.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fellowship felt like it was made by an auteur, inventive and exciting, full of style. Then it all went a bit too CGI which is where the disappointment kicked in for me. The bar was probably set too high with Fellowship.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With the exception of Hellboy I and II all of Del Toros English language work has been disappointing - Pacific Rim, Crimson Peak and Shape of Water have all let me down. I think I'm done with him.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure why that voicing my opinion with personal reasons to justify those opinions gets negative reactions but no actual response. Hey ho. This is "disappointing" films not "worst" films. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 01/09/2019 at 20:31, cubik said:

There's a couple for me that have already been posted:

 

TLJ (sorry to everyone who loved it) - The forced humour (a joke about ironing!) is top of my list of things I didn't like, followed by the Casino planet. 

As also mentioned, GOTG2. @Gord nails exactly how it felt. Just an amplification of everything that was good to the point where it got annoying.

 

Give it 12-18 months and I'm sure I'll be editing this post to include the Coming to America sequel that's allegedly supposed to be happening. Just leave it alone please Hollywood.

How could you be disappointed in it if you are expecting it to be bad?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, neoELITE said:

Not sure why that voicing my opinion with personal reasons to justify those opinions gets negative reactions but no actual response. Hey ho. This is "disappointing" films not "worst" films. 

 

Because no-one has the right to judge the legend that is...

 

 

spacer.png

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.