Jump to content
rllmuk
Gord

Your most disappointing films..

Recommended Posts

In honour of @JPL 

 

Mine had to be Guardians of the Galaxy 2 - loved the first , the second left me cold.  They took everything that was cool in the first and turned it up to eleven and killed it stone dead for me.

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a couple for me that have already been posted:

 

TLJ (sorry to everyone who loved it) - The forced humour (a joke about ironing!) is top of my list of things I didn't like, followed by the Casino planet. 

As also mentioned, GOTG2. @Gord nails exactly how it felt. Just an amplification of everything that was good to the point where it got annoying.

 

Give it 12-18 months and I'm sure I'll be editing this post to include the Coming to America sequel that's allegedly supposed to be happening. Just leave it alone please Hollywood.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oddly enough I felt the same about GotG2 when I first watched it, but then I went back and gave it another go when it appeared on Netflix and I really enjoyed it. I think it was just too jarring the first time but familiarity softened it.

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Matt Defis said:

Solo, watched again last night with the kids for three first time since seeing it away the cinema, not good,  not bad,  just horribly boring. 

 

I wasn't expecting much of it in the first instance so wasn't disappointed with the universe shrinking, character ruining crapulance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Bucky said:

No one can have thought that second Matrix movie was any good after the highs of the first one right?

Good call - On the subject of a sequel too far, how about Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull?

 

The trailer had that iconic music plus that hat. I was excited when I saw the trailer.

 

The film had Indy surviving a nuclear blast, aliens, a babbling John Hurt, awful accented Russian baddie and Shia "Poochie" Leboeuf

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alien 3

 

I've warmed to it a fair bit in the years since but that first viewing all those years ago was disappointment incarnate. The cool working joes and cocky marines of the previous films were replaced by a bunch of identikit British baldy scumbags; it had nowhere near the tension or excitement of its predecessor and butchered its remaining cast; the score was utterly unmemorable; the entire thing looked like it was filmed with shit smeared over all the lenses; the Alien itself looked like hot garbage; and the ending was just a huge goddamn bummer. I came out the cinema more deflated than from any film before or since.

  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Phantom Menace for me without a shadow of doubt.  I had waited best part of twenty years for new Star Wars and was beyond excited when it came out.  The trailers all looked mint and then we were dealt that turd , I could have cried coming out the cinema.  Mates were trying to justify liking it but I never went down that route.  I called it bollocks from day 1 and have never been suckered into media and review hype since.

  • Upvote 5
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Matrix Revolutions

 

Contrary to what @Bucky posted above, I've always been a defender of The Matrix Reloaded. Of course its story was nowhere near as tight as the first film, and had more obvious flaws than the original in plenty of other ways, but oh, that glorious action! (Come on, there are only, like, two shots in the Burly Brawl where the CGI is bothersome, and they both involve Neo flying up in the air.) And for a few months in 2003, I was hopeful that The Matrix Revolutions would come out with a single inspired twist that would recontextualise all the apparent "flaws" of Reloaded, making everything just click, elevating both sequels.

 

Spoiler: that did not happen. :(


My hopes of a grand revelation were dashed when the great cliffhanger mystery from Reloaded - Neo's ability to control machines outside the Matrix - was not resolved in a satisfying way. Still, at least the Wachowskis didn't go with the literal "Matrix within a Matrix!!!!:o" twist that everyone had been jokingly predicting from the moment the sequels were announced. Instead they made the next layer of the system's control a metaphorical Matrix. Which is a fine concept, but not a very immediately satisfying revelation.

 

Fans of The Matrix Revolutions sometimes say that the reason people disliked it was that the film ended in a peaceful truce, rather than a heroic victory. But that outcome was not one of the things I objected to! It was the events along the way that were the problem.

 

The Zion dock attack was action was spectacular, but, as it was set in the Real World, not really what I wanted from a Matrix film. What I wanted was an extension of the flowing dance of blocks and parries that had impressed me so much in the first film, but I had to wait for the John Wick series to see Keanu do that. Instead, the final fight against Smith seemed to consist of haymaker punches knocking one character down, punctuated by brief bits of dialogue. There was one cool shot where we see them in profile in silhouette, but they cut away from it too soon. Even the sole in-Matrix gunfight, with the enemies hanging from the ceiling, was a poor cousin of the original lobby shootout: I think there was only one shot I liked, an over-the-shoulder shot where you could see the shooter (Trinity?) and their victim in the same frame, like the camera in a third-person shooter game.

I realise all of those criticisms sound like entitled complaints about how the film is bad simply because it was not what I expected. The truth is that that disappointing first viewing was so dominant in my memory, and I've rewatched it so little in the last 16 years, that I struggle to come up with criticisms that address the film as what it is, rather than what I wanted it to be.

 

I've since been persuaded that some of the flaws have more logic behind them than it originally seemed. For example, at the time, the bit where the gang seeks out the Merovingian in his club felt like a pointless digression that led nowhere (and as I said, involved a disappointing action sequence). But I've since heard the argument that Trinity's interruption of his request to bring him the Eyes of the Oracle represents the heroine finally taking the initiative, rather than following an instruction to go on yet another fetch quest like those in Reloaded. Fair enough as a thematic concept, but it didn't really make for an immediately satisfying film - and that's what this thread is about, our most disappointing first viewings!

 

Still, I do tend to be more persuaded by people defending Revolutions than I do by people defending the Star Wars prequels. Again, these defences tend to praise the sequels mostly for their unique thematic ambition, and subversion of the Chosen One prophesy of the first film:

 

https://boxd.it/NjogV

 

Quote

Whereas Reloaded spent a lot of its run time treading water and focusing on plots that felt largely tangential, Revolutions moves with a much clearer sense of purpose. The Merovingian is still a distraction, but at least the early scenes with Neo serve a purpose that is as narratively relevant as thematically important; it is vital that Neo come to recognise that the machines have their own autonomy and their own integrity, just as it is important to establish the idea of something equivalent to a “soul” that can navigate both worlds; that Neo’s body can lie limp in the real world while his essence moves through the machine world.

 

Of course, this vague and abstract spirituality may be part of the reason that fans of The Matrix reacted so strongly against Revolutions. A lot of online debate focuses on the absurdity of elements like Neo’s ability to control machines in the real world, or to see what looks similar to code (albeit orange rather than green) outside of the Matrix. However, theme and narrative have always been more important to the Wachowskis than any set of rules. The point of these sequences is to deliberately and ambiguously blur the boundaries that exist the two worlds, rejecting the rigid assertion that the world of men must inherently be superior to the world of machines. This is not a story about asserting one reality over another, but instead about attempting to reconcile two radically different realities to one another.

 

Revolutions subverts expectations in a variety of ways. The big battle for Zion happens towards the middle of the film, rather than towards the climax. For most of the battle, the primary cast are entirely absent. Instead, the audience watches a bunch of people trying to work together as part of a greater whole, without an easy “hero” or “chosen one” character with which the audience might identify. While this is happening, Neo wanders off on his own adventure and Morpheus’ last-minute attempt to save the day just makes things worse. If Reloaded rejected “Chosen One” narratives as just another system of manipulation and control, Revolutions takes that idea to its extreme by arguing that the most important thing that people can do is to cooperate with one another.

 

And then there's this video about how there's an effective action movie narrative hidden in there if you care to look:

 

 

Things I liked: the section where Smith possesses a human body. Neo running off the train station at one end of the screen and looping back to the other side. And the music (Neodammerung!)

 

And this, obviously:

 

Spoiler

Kn4Ep5C.gif

 

 

 

 

 

When I saw this thread title, the first film I thought of was X-Men 3. My complaints about that film probably add up to a couple of paragraphs, and no links. Why oh why didn't I write about that instead...? :doh:

  • Upvote 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Godzilla 2014. Remember that awesome halo jump sequence from the trailer and how exciting it was to see Godzilla? Well forget all that, here's 2 hours of boring human characters and 12 minutes of Godzilla, shot in the dark. The sequel wasn't much better either but my expectations weren't as high for that after the first one failed to deliver.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it Ghostbusters 2?

 

 I think that was the first film I watched where the reality didn't live up to the hype. Even at a young age I could tell this wasn't as good as the first one, even if I couldn't tell why.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I instantly thought of three films when I saw the thread name, and two of them (The Phantom Menace and The Matrix Revolutions) have already been said, so I guess I'll go with Mission: impossible 2.

 

Teenage me had really enjoyed the first film, and was now familiar with John Woo through Hard Boiled, and The Killer, so I genuinely couldn't wait, but unfortunately the film was an underwhelming mess, full of ambitious but slightly unconvincing stunts (the motorcycle "jousting" sticks out), ridiculous plotting, and a thoroughly forgettable antagonist.

 

I'm now trying to think of a disappointing indie/non-blockbuster, as so far everything we've said has been something with an enormous marketing budget, and while it's understandable that our most memorable disappointments stem from an overabundance of hype, I'm sure there's plenty of other stuff that just didn't live up to our expectations...

 

But no, I've just remembered The Lost World: Jurassic Park instead. :P

  • Upvote 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Stigweard said:

Godzilla 2014. Remember that awesome halo jump sequence from the trailer and how exciting it was to see Godzilla? Well forget all that, here's 2 hours of boring human characters and 12 minutes of Godzilla, shot in the dark.

 

Imagine if they'd made the sort of film that this trailer suggested was coming!

 

 

 

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing comes close to The Phantom Menace, not even a little bit. I can be generous with hindsight (it's the best of the three prequels; the score is fantastic; Maul is an amazing villain; some of the designs push the universe in a good - if unexpected - direction) but... oh man.

 

The preeqs are the biggest white elephant in film history. They necessitated sequels that tried to undo the mess, and only made it worse. It turned the 'franchise' into something its creator wanted nothing more to do with. On a personal level, it's made it impossible for me to get fully hyped for a sequel! There's always that nagging doubt it'll be another TPM.

  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Bucky said:

No one can have thought that second Matrix movie was any good after the highs of the first one right?

 

There's an hour or so of action in the middle of that film which is fantastic if you can ignore absolutely everything else.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can vividly remember while watching at the cinema the point the realisation set in with me that The Phantom Menace was going to really blow.  They had found Jar Jar spouting bollocks as he did, and then went for a trip in a submersible which nearly got ate by a giant fish, which was subsequently eaten by a bigger fish.  Ok fair enough but then like less than a minute later the exact same thing happened again, and it dawned on me they ain’t got nothing here.:doh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pacific Rim Uprising was a massive disapointment. The first movie was not perfect, but it was 99% of everything my inner 8 year old wanted. The second one just felt like a cynical move from someone at a company going "ooh, unexpected good results from that robot movie, ok how do we monetise this, kids like robots, lets get a sequel,  a cheap cartoon and some toy lines going, lose the boring adults and their tension and get some sassy kid pilots in there and maybe throw in a fart or B.O. joke as well, kids love that shit.". The surface was there, more giant robots fighting bigger nastier monsters, but the depth and spirit were absent.

 

I imagine the corporate person who pushed this through to be a mix of Linda Ferguson from Orange is the new black and that guy from the Tom Hanks movie Big who thought his transforming building toy was epic and just didn't get it.

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Timmo said:

 

There's an hour or so of action in the middle of that film which is fantastic if you can ignore absolutely everything else.

I agree.

 

But that first Architect scene and that floppy CGI just broke me.  I think Last Crusade scene with the Nazi crashing in the plane did exactly the same thing to me as well.

 

Maybe it's unfair, but I just remember my feeling totally deflated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.