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32 minutes ago, ZOK said:


It’s weird, I’ve watched this film a few times and there’s no need for subtitles that I ever noticed, it’s fine to my ears...but I have noticed a trend for news programmes in recent years to start subtitling anyone who has even a vaguely foreign accent.

 

I don’t know what’s going on...are people becoming accent deaf? I’m sure YouTube is to blame somehow.

 

It could be that I'm so used to blockbusters, where all the dialogue is redone in studio ADR sessions, that I'm starting to struggle with indie movies that use the original on-set recordings for their speech! (At least, I assume Brick didn't have the budget for an ADR process...?)

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Aftermath - 2/5

 

Arnold does acting! He’s still a big lummox, but the film is a watchable enough drama despite a fairly pedestrian pace.
 

Think it’s a solid 2 but not quite good enough to be a 3. I do enjoy watching Arnie in pretty much most things though, hope he gets one more big role soon.

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1 hour ago, Nick R said:

 

It could be that I'm so used to blockbusters, where all the dialogue is redone in studio ADR sessions, that I'm starting to struggle with indie movies that use the original on-set recordings for their speech! (At least, I assume Brick didn't have the budget for an ADR process...?)

Brick is notoriously difficult for dialogue. The director even has gone on record to state that very important lines are lost in the low budget independent mix.

I saw it in the cinema and it wasn't until a few viewings later that I caught some things. The films exclusive dialect definitely makes it harder.

Its by far and away his best film though so I hope you do double dip.

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2 hours ago, Mike S said:

 

 

Never mind the end section being perfect, the whole film is perfect, at least it is in its theatrical cut. Ironically, 'The Version You've Never Seen'/ Authors Cut (Friedkin was opposed to the new edit as he considered his 1973 version to be definitive but the scenes were studio pushed and approved by Blatty) is some way less than perfect though as there are a few added scenes that add nothing and are actively detrimental to the movie - most notably the awful, context and reaction free, 'spider walk' scene but also the various demon faces superimposed on a few random objects.

 

The intro is significant and important. It not only introduces Merrin but it also shows his first exposure to Pazuzu and the moment he starts on his path to becoming an exorcist and also telegraphs his death at the hands of the demon. He is literally facing the evil that that will eventually destroy him and you can see that in his face - he knows this is his destiny. One of my favourite scenes is right after that intro, when they cut to Chris and Regan in the basement of their house and we see her just completing a little papier mache figure of a bird with outstretched wings that was a representation of the statue of Pazuzu that Merrin had just been seen confronting. Captain Howdy was already subtly guiding her hand. Such a quiet passing moment of horror.


The Exorcist is the Greatest Film.


100% this. But also, it works most effectively on the big screen where you are trapped in the dark with no phone or distractions. Yes, the start is slow, but it sets a mood that takes the real world very far away from you. It's almost like a decompression. You need 10 minutes of real world deprogramming to get you into the right space to begin the story. 

Watching Exorcist in a cinema with an audience trapped is an unreal experience. I remember the first time I did this, in about 1995. When it was still banned outside Westminster and you had to go to the Trocadero in London to see it. There were two 17 year old girls in front of us watching. During the first jump scares they laughed, giggled, joked and had fun. When her head spun they left. It was genuinely too much. I'll never forget that.

I doubt it would happen now, we are all so much more desensitised and distracted these days. But i'll never forget that visceral response where these kids thought they were gonna have fun and the film, 30 years after its original release was still simply too much.

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Last To Surrender (1999)

Rowdy Roddy Piper stars in this largely standard-issue straight-to-video buddy-cop film, a genre beyond moribund at this point, although here it sort of morphs into something akin to an 80s Vietnam war film. Piper is a cop on the beat in Chinatown, cocks up some big deal between Chinese gangsters, would you believe it, he gets his partner killed. And the waiter who keeps getting in the way? Whaddya know, he's a cop (Han Soo Ong), and he and Piper have to team up, and they don't get on etc etc. The action moves from Canada- er I mean Seattle to the country formerly known as Burma where the generic Chinese baddie has fled. A large part of the middle section of this film centres on our chalk and cheese cops learning to get along, and if you've seen enough of this sort of thing you'll know it's no spoiler to say they eventually end up respecting each other enough to kick some arse. It flags in places, and the generic opening doesn't inspire, but for all its flaws it's an overall entertaining and undemanding watch with some fun action later on.

 

3/5

 

 

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I think The Exorcist was re-released in the late 90's I think? I remember seeing it at a local multiplex anyway, but I do remember think just how stunningly amazing it was, I was blown away

 

I've had a similar experiences with a few other classic flicks like a Blue Velvet/Lost Highway double bill at the Curzon Soho, Lawrence of Arabia, and even dare I say it even the Star Wars re-releases.

 

Shows the importance of repertory cinema, and we don't get to do enough of it. Movies were made to be experienced on the big screen and have an indescribable magic you don't get from home watching. They're still as good, but the magic is diminished, even if just a little bit.

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6 minutes ago, hub2 said:

I think The Exorcist was re-released in the late 90's I think? I remember seeing it at a local multiplex anyway, but I do remember think just how stunningly amazing it was, I was blown away

 

I've had a similar experiences with a few other classic flicks like a Blue Velvet/Lost Highway double bill at the Curzon Soho, Lawrence of Arabia, and even dare I say it even the Star Wars re-releases.

 

Shows the importance of repertory cinema, and we don't get to do enough of it. Movies were made to be experienced on the big screen and have an indescribable magic you don't get from home watching. They're still as good, but the magic is diminished, even if just a little bit.

Totally. Saw The Exorcist when it went into cinemas in the late 90s, and had the privilege to see 2001: A Space Odyssey on the big screen too. It really is an experience.

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25 minutes ago, Vimster said:

Totally. Saw The Exorcist when it went into cinemas in the late 90s, and had the privilege to see 2001: A Space Odyssey on the big screen too. It really is an experience.


I watched 2001 on video 3 times and always proudly screamed about how overrated it is.

Saw it at the national theatre with John Williams and an Orchestra doing the score live to the picture and realised immediately that it was the greatest cinematic achievement of all time except maybe Apocalypse Now. 

Cinema. For FUCK sake.

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7 hours ago, hub2 said:

I think The Exorcist was re-released in the late 90's I think? I remember seeing it at a local multiplex anyway, but I do remember think just how stunningly amazing it was, I was blown away

 

I've had a similar experiences with a few other classic flicks like a Blue Velvet/Lost Highway double bill at the Curzon Soho, Lawrence of Arabia, and even dare I say it even the Star Wars re-releases.

 

Shows the importance of repertory cinema, and we don't get to do enough of it. Movies were made to be experienced on the big screen and have an indescribable magic you don't get from home watching. They're still as good, but the magic is diminished, even if just a little bit.


The Exorcist was in cinemas in ‘98, I know that because my friends & I went to see it the same weekend as we went to Ozzfest.

 

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8 hours ago, kerraig UK said:


I watched 2001 on video 3 times and always proudly screamed about how overrated it is.

Saw it at the national theatre with John Williams and an Orchestra doing the score live to the picture and realised immediately that it was the greatest cinematic achievement of all time except maybe Apocalypse Now. 

Cinema. For FUCK sake.


The first (and only) time I saw 2001 was when they released it again a few years back, I sat in the front row of the Watershed (I always sit at the front mind if I can) and the scale of it blew me away. Stunning, and the crystal clear score was unbelievable. 
 

On the subject of movie orchestras I’ve seen quite a few silent flicks with live scoring (including City Lights and The General, incredible!), but in 2014 I had the privilege of seeing Psycho at the Colston Hall with the British Sinfonietta doing the Herrmann score...just a breathtaking experience.

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6 minutes ago, ZOK said:


The first (and only) time I saw 2001 was when they released it again a few years back, I sat in the front row of the Watershed (I always sit at the front mind if I can) and the scale of it blew me away. Stunning, and the crystal clear score was unbelievable. 
 

On the subject of movie orchestras I’ve seen quite a few silent flicks with live scoring (including City Lights and The General, incredible!), but in 2014 I had the privilege of seeing Psycho at the Colston Hall with the British Sinfonietta doing the Herrmann score...just a breathtaking experience.

 
I am extremely fortunate in London in that there are ample films with live score events. I've even seen Terminator 2 with live score.

I imagine Psycho was exceptional. But 2001 is transcendent. As I often quote in interviews, its not my favourite film, but its by far and away the best film ever made.

I doubt Kurosawa or Tarkovsky would disagree. 

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Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials - 4/5.

 

The first film surprised me by how decent it was, and this one is even better. It's full of clichés and corny dialogue, but the story and setting are very interesting.

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10 hours ago, kerraig UK said:


I watched 2001 on video 3 times and always proudly screamed about how overrated it is.

Saw it at the national theatre with John Williams and an Orchestra doing the score live to the picture and realised immediately that it was the greatest cinematic achievement of all time except maybe Apocalypse Now. 

Cinema. For FUCK sake.

I saw it in Hull in 1995. I was on an abortive attempt at a degree there. It was a smaller place that showed artier films so it wasn't huge but it was big enough to get that sense of scale and awe. Last time I saw the film was when my brother bought it for me on DVD in about 2002 and frankly it just wasn't the same, even on headphones in a dark room. I rarely managed to get to the cinema pre-Covid but nothing has touched that experience for me since.

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Shadow of a Doubt (1943)

 

This was much better. A tighter plot and cast. I didn't trust Uncle Charlie from the moment he arrived at his sister's family home, and his behaviour towards his eldest niece was proper cringey. I did feel sorry for little Ann though, as every time she tried to talk no one would listen to her :lol: and the mum was properly annoying.

 

4/5

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52 minutes ago, wev said:

Shadow of a Doubt (1943)

 

This was much better. A tighter plot and cast. I didn't trust Uncle Charlie from the moment he arrived at his sister's family home, and is behaviour towards his eldest niece was proper cringey. I did feel sorry for little Ann though, as every time she tried to talk no one would listen to her :lol: and the mum was properly annoying.

 

4/5

And here we fucking go... 

This is the most exciting journey to happen to rllmuk in years. 

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Skyscraper (2019)

 

Die Hard meets Towering Inferno staring The Rock. It's exactly what you'd expect. Entertaining enough, but nothing new, nothing special, nothing that interesting. Plot holes and stupid decisions galore.

 

I enjoyed it, weirdly.

 

2/5, though

 

 

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21 hours ago, Mike S said:

 

 

Never mind the end section being perfect, the whole film is perfect, at least it is in its theatrical cut. Ironically, 'The Version You've Never Seen'/ Authors Cut (Friedkin was opposed to the new edit as he considered his 1973 version to be definitive, but the scenes were studio pushed and approved by Blatty) is some way less than perfect though as there are a few added scenes that add nothing and are actively detrimental to the movie - most notably the awful, context and reaction free, 'spider walk' scene but also the various demon faces superimposed on a few random objects.

 

The intro is significant and important. It not only introduces Merrin but it also shows his first exposure to Pazuzu and the moment he starts on his path to becoming an exorcist but also telegraphs his death at the hands of the demon. He is literally facing the evil that that will eventually destroy him and you can see that in his face - he knows this is his destiny. One of my favourite scenes is right after that intro, when they cut to Chris and Regan in the basement of their house and we see Regan just completing a little papier mache figure of a bird with outstretched wings that was unknown to her a representation of the statue of Pazuzu that Merrin had just been seen confronting. Captain Howdy was already subtly guiding her hand. Such a quiet passing moment of horror.


The Exorcist is the Greatest Film.

Are you Mark Kermode?

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8 hours ago, Thwomp said:

Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials - 4/5.

 

The first film surprised me by how decent it was, and this one is even better. It's full of clichés and corny dialogue, but the story and setting are very interesting.

It’s an excellent series of films 

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Bloodshot

 

I mean, don't watch the trailer because it is the film.

 

That said, this was absolute stupidity at its most mediocre. I enjoyed it, but I'm not entirely sure why. It's action isn't that good, the acting is sub-F&F, the special effects are ropey and...I dunno...it kinda just happens.

 

But we enjoyed it. Especially the action sequence that was set in London but, if you've ever seen London in almost any other film or especially in person, was quite clearly not shot there.

 

1990s/5

 

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Paths of Glory

I was expecting some grandiose, beardy plot I'd really have to focus my TV-addled mind to keep up with, but it was actually really straightforward and only 1.5hrs long. Very much Blackadder Goes Forth vibes with the comical madness of war, honour, etc, but played more straight and a much bigger budget. Kirk Douglas and George MacCready are brilliantly convincing as protagonist/antagonist.  Wow, I just learned that was Kubrick's wife at the end. I think the only woman in whole the film? Also surprised to see Dr. Eldon Tyrell in it.

 

Would watch again, 4/5

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I watched Blade Runner 2049 last night and I'm really not sure how to rate it. I thought it was a masterpiece until Harrison Ford came into it, and everything after that was a heap of shite. He wasn't even playing Deckard, he was just phoning it in, playing Harrison Ford in grumpy, casual clothes mode. So maybe 3.5/5. 

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Rising Storm (1989)

Hugely-enjoyable post-apocalyptic adventure set in an America ruled by a fascist evangelist. Two brothers get involved with sisters who are on the hunt for evidence of a revolutionary figure thought to be a myth. The humour in this is spot-on, the tone firmly tongue-in-cheek, playful, with a nod to satire. Despite what was probably a lower budget there is tons of detail everywhere creating a rich world through signage, costumes, little things going on in the background or on screens and touches here and there. John Rhys Davis looks like he was having a blast as the arsehole commander seeking the outlaws, especially in one scene where he comes across what he believes an 'anti-personnel device'. The leads are likeable and I found myself rooting for them. Well worth a watch.

 

4/5

 

 

vlcsnap-2020-07-19-17h14m12s935.png

 

I just went to put my review on Letterboxed and, jeez, what a bunch of miserable bastards. Apparently this is lazy and cheap. They clearly need to be watching more films then.

 

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On 18/07/2020 at 19:42, sandman said:

Are you Mark Kermode?

 

 

More Mike Commode than Mark Kermode sadly, but nobody throws even the lightest of shade at The Exorcist. Not on my watch...

 

It is my favourite film ever and one that I can watch and watch and still have goosebumps every single time. I also own two artworks inspired by the Best Film Of All Time as I do not mess about when it comes to fanboyism.

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The Old Guard - 2/5

 

It’s not too bad, just a bit flat in between some quite chaotic action. Also, despite the Dolby Vision, feels pretty low-rent in places, with some budget locations undermining any sense of scale. Generally a watchable cast though and is a pretty inoffensive two hours overall.

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5 hours ago, Vimster said:

Rising Storm (1989)

Hugely-enjoyable post-apocalyptic adventure set in an America ruled by a fascist evangelist. Two brothers get involved with sisters who are on the hunt for evidence of a revolutionary figure thought to be a myth. The humour in this is spot-on, the tone firmly tongue-in-cheek, playful, with a nod to satire. Despite what was probably a lower budget there is tons of detail everywhere creating a rich world through signage, costumes, little things going on in the background or on screens and touches here and there. John Rhys Davis looks like he was having a blast as the arsehole commander seeking the outlaws, especially in one scene where he comes across what he believes an 'anti-personnel device'. The leads are likeable and I found myself rooting for them. Well worth a watch.

 

4/5

 

 

vlcsnap-2020-07-19-17h14m12s935.png

 

I just went to put my review on Letterboxed and, jeez, what a bunch of miserable bastards. Apparently this is lazy and cheap. They clearly need to be watching more films then.

 

 

Never heard of Letterboxed and the first review I read starts "Film #299 of 2020" A two film a day kind of person on there huh? This film is on Youtube, will watch in the week. Cheers. 

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34 minutes ago, Indy @ S.E. said:

The old guard - 4/10.

 

Not terrible by any stretch but could’ve been a lot better.

 

:quote:

 

 

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