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Rate the last film you watched out of 5


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King Richard (2021)

 

When this was announced I really disliked the idea that 2 of the greatest sportstars of all time were having a film made about their Dad rather than them. However after watching the film today, I totally get it and why it works so well. I must stress there's plenty of Venus and Serena in the film too, especially Venus

Spoiler

(the films ends with her pro journey just beginning)

 

Will Smith puts in a fantastic performance as the titular character and I can see where the Oscar buzz is coming from. I think films like this is where he really shines. He needs to put the shite action films to bed and show off his acting talents in more films like this. 

 

It would be quite easy to look at this film and see it as one of an overbearing, pushy and maybe abusing parent but that's not how I came away from it. Obviously in real life it may have been different and I understand films can sugar coat things but he never came off as abusive or horrible for me. Yes he pushed them hard but he also made sure they were well educated and got to enjoy their childhoods too. It's the story of a man who wanted better for his children, who truley believed they would be the best whilst also keeping them humble. It doesn't shy away from his shitty past with his ex wife though which I think was important to show. 

 

The family dynamic was really well portrayed and I enjoyed watching the story of two of the greatest woman in the history of the sport and where they came from, even if it was told from the perspective of their father. However I think it's probably important to see that story though because behind the scenes he made some important decisions that shaped their career.

 

Outside of the main story though, the tennis matches are really well done and some even got me really invested in the outcome. I have to say it also got me a little mistyeyed at the end too.

 

4/5

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No time to die - 3.5/5

 

Its too long, weak villain but its bloody good fun and was a great movie to just forget about the family grind - its trying far too hard to be every Bond film ever and please all generations etc but aside from that its just a fun action film that you can’t take seriously so enjoyable.

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On 20/11/2021 at 12:15, Fargo said:

Tick Tick Boom. Not normally a fan of musicals but this was great. 4/5 

 

My wife got to exactly this point - "bo bo bo bo bo" and said, "Right, turn this off., so I haven't seem anymore. I may go back at some stage.

 

 

For what it's worth, I think this film has some of the worst type on it's official title I've ever seen.

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Belfast

 

I thought this was perfect. It's so well shot it's like it's been fully formed inside the mind of Kenneth Branagh because he's spent his whole directing career thinking about it, although I gather the cinematographer obviously had a bigger say in how these shots are framed, because god they're so good it hurts. There are too many to mention but one is a shot of the taxman coming to the door, so the camera is low inside the house, the taxman is fuzzily visible through the door window and knocks on, and the kid of the story rushes from the left to answer the door and his mother grabs the back of his t shirt and claws him back. 

 

If you're thinking that doesn't sound like much then, well, i appreciated it.

 

David Chen of /filmcast was dismissive of this in ways I don't think he'll realise is insulting, posting a review like 'A movie length version of the sentence, “BELFAST IS OUR HOME”, being cynical about its black and white cinematography because this follows films like Roma, and finding the casting of someone as good looking as Jamie Dornan as the dad who works in construction laughable. If this was a film about the Asian American experience of America I don't think he'd like someone being so dismissive. 

 

What I found so fantastic about it was I expected something downbeat and grim and it's not, there's a lightness to it despite the fraught times, a humour and warmth in every scene. The black and white and casting tries to capture the 60s American photography in Life magazine despite the whole film being confined to one street. So the mother is the model beautiful housewife but with a strong mind of her own, the father works in construction but isn't predictably a man of his time who is overbearing and aggressive. It wasn't accidental casting or anything. I can't actually remember if Jamie Dornan wears a flapcap but maybe they thought that was too much. 

 

Its efficiency is just masterful honestly. If you start watching and thinking; really? then early on there is a scene of the kids going to church and well what might it be like? What might it try to say? It's so good and funny and moreover efficient it's like its operating on a different level to most stuff I've watched recently, the use of language, the performances, the timing, how it ties into the family's view of Catholics. 

 

Maybe I'm overselling this, maybe I need to rein it in. It's not a thrilling film or anything, it keeps everything small from a child's view, but going back to the 60s photography again, it captures so much of those child moments that become romanticised, like the kid likes a girl in class and doesn't know how to gain her attention. By capturing it how it does despite being set in Belfast is inspired I think. It's beautiful and timeless without being sentimental or trite. 

 

Just the grandad's unending love for grandma played by Judy Dench who is both charmed by it and rolling her eyes like she's been hearing this for 50 years already. But it's that the kid is sat on the couch watching these interactions beaming that makes them. The blackest heart can't fail to be moved by the kid's attachment to his grandad. 

 

I just think great directing is getting the most out of scenes, so if the family consider moving and the mother and father are torn and they discuss it, how do you do it? It's perfectly shot, it's perfectly written, it's perfectly paced. 

 

5/5 

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18 hours ago, SpagMasterSwift said:

The Power Of The Dog

 

I do love a film that I have no idea where it’s going.

 

4/5

 

But then hate it because it goes nowhere? 

 

Most boring film I've ever seen, honestly, and I played it at 1.3 speed. Yeahh I understand the film, it's hardly subtle. 

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Trainspotting (1996)

It was such a big film at the time, based on a novel by a hot writer, killer soundtrack, it could have been trapped in that mid-90s cool bubble, but this is still very watchable 25 years on and has matured. Great performances from a cast of then largely unknown actors who would go into bigger things in different areas. It's as playful, grimy, funny and tragic as the novel but with added twists and flights of fancy. Watch this on your fucking big television.

 

4/5

 

Honest Thief (202)

By the numbers Liam Neeson revenge thriller where he is a bank-robbing ex-marine who gets double-crossed by a couple of dodgy FBI agents. It's so generic it does the visual equivalent of going in one ear and out the other without touching the sides. I thought he said he was stopping doing stuff like this.

 

2/5

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Eye Of The Eagle (1987)

Quick and dirty video shop fodder action from Chirio Santiago that is borderline watchable, with some troops tracking down a rouge band in 'Nam. Obviously tossed out in no time, it has all the energy you'd want from a cheapo mid-80s Vietnam war flick, jungle-based gun fights, shit exploding, but look any deeper and you'll find nothing. Going to be honest and say I lost track of who was shooting who, what was exploding, and apart from the last 10 minutes it merely filled time. One of those films you might enjoy if you're in the right mood. I wasn't on this occasion.

 

2/5

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5 hours ago, g wings said:

But you didn’t really, did you? 

 

Yeah? Are you thinking that's trying to be a funny line or no one should do that to a film? At 1.4 speed it's a bit too laughably chipmunk quick so I'm settling on 1.3 now for chunks of films if it's either that or they become another I don't finish. It is a last resort. I know I shouldn't but it's better than skipping ahead because that never works. When dramatic moments appear I drop back to normal speed.

 

People say 'kids have short attention spans these days', but that's not even true when you've got 10 hour TV series people get through in days. Maybe the adults making stories could try telling more engaging stories so people are gripped and say things like 'wow, I can't wait to see where this is going!' rather than 'why did you even bother making this? Really? This?' Even at 1.3 the film is achingly slow. I was genuinely baffled by the acclaim it's got compared with what I was watching, I think you could tell me about any of your days last week and it'd be more interesting, I know I've had more eventful experiences trying to find parking. Once a film loses me that's it really. I gave it 35 minutes. I know this thread is a celebration of film mostly and even in boredom I took something from it, I don't consider any film a waste of my time because everything is always so tonally different. 

 

When I read 'directors blasting other directors' quotes like Bergman call Citizen Kane 'a total bore' or Bergman on Godard, again 'a fucking bore', it makes me think, oh are we allowed to think that? All films are trying to be interesting, are they? Not just there are people doing things on screen we should automatically care because they're people and we're people too therefore we should care. 

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9 hours ago, Vimster said:

Eye Of The Eagle (1987)

Quick and dirty video shop fodder action from Chirio Santiago that is borderline watchable, with some troops tracking down a rouge band in 'Nam. Obviously tossed out in no time, it has all the energy you'd want from a cheapo mid-80s Vietnam war flick, jungle-based gun fights, shit exploding, but look any deeper and you'll find nothing. Going to be honest and say I lost track of who was shooting who, what was exploding, and apart from the last 10 minutes it merely filled time. One of those films you might enjoy if you're in the right mood. I wasn't on this occasion.

 

2/5


A Rouge Squadron prequel?

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7 minutes ago, Triple A said:

Absolute madness

 

Is it though? I think watching a new cinematic film on a plane on a tiny screen hunched up with the noise (I have the best bose noise cancelling earphones, still not enough on a plane) is madness and you're ruining a potentially great experience there. My brother did that with Mad Max Fury Road and it bothered me, and I didn't even like the film, I just thought; 'well, you've potentially robbed yourself of an amazing experience there, and for what?' 

 

I highly value art, it's not just a time filler for me and that's my point, I want stuff to jolt me, amaze me, completely grab me, from the outside when you only know the title, the casting, seen a few stills, everything inside a film is a 2 hour mystery that unfolds. I always get excited when a film begins, even on a 12 inch or 17 inch screen it feels eventful to me. 

 

I thought Richard Bacon watching Breaking Bad on a train to work was scandalous. I think viewers should treat everyone who worked on a film and the film itself with respect and watch it properly, not merely squeeze it in in transport and pretend you're just far too busy as though you're the American president and don't just have a generic unimportant office job like millions of others. I watch everything in pitch darkness giving it my full attention.

 

Boredom just kills me now. I have real problems engaging with films, sometimes I think it's me, like there's some deep void inside me and the film is acting as a distraction, I'm not embracing it, drinking it all up like I really want to. Then I watch a properly engaging film, even one I've seen before like Eden Lake (no one fucking slag it off now) and I'm completely gripped because it has stakes, it has tension, it has characters I care about, it has real character progression which is so well done you don't even realise it's happening, and I think..was I just in the right mood or is everything else I seem to watch largely rubbish? Sure things are presented on the screen but have they really wrung everything out of everything? I don't think so.

 

Eden Lake is classic ! No one bloody go there ! I realise it is a thriller and a bunch of teenagers terrorising Michael Fassbender is probably naturally more engaging that Kirsten Dunst trying to play piano and Cumberbatch disrupting her by playing his banjo upstairs can't compare but it was half way through and I was bored. 

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23 hours ago, neoELITE said:

ID2

I like the original with Sean Bean. This was awful. I have no idea why I watched it but I did.

0/5

 

Sean Bean isn't in the original, is he? Not least because I doubt Shadwell hooligans would ever believe someone with such a strong Yorkshire accent would be one of them. 

 

Anyway 

Red Notice 

Complete no brainer, leave your disbelief at the door action. It's never going to win any awards, but I was entertained throughout. Could have lived with being about 20 minutes shorter but it's plenty enjoyable. The Rock is the Rock, Ryan Reynolds is Ryan Reynolds, Gal Godot is slightly wasted. 

 

A solid 3.5/5

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The Paper Tigers - 3.5 / 5

3 young guys train with a kung-fu sifu and become his disciples. 25 years later they have fallen out of touch and the sifu is murdered so they have to find out what happened and take revenge. It's light hearted, pretty funny and enjoyable. It's not about flashy effects or amazing kung-fu, more about friendship and getting old.

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Phantasm IV

 

The Phantasm films have such odd meandering plots. Can you call them plots? Probably not. They’re more like dreams. The fourth one is no exception but is probably the weakest so far. Reggie is still one of the greatest characters in horror history though!

 

3 out of 5

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Maeve - 3.5/5 (MUBI)

 

This is a lovely and very watchable film, an intimate portrait from 1980 of a woman struggling to align feminism and nationalism as she travels between the civil war torn Belfast of her youth and the present day, and a new life in the heart of the empire.

 

Having recently tucked away the audiobook of the ‘Troubles’ history Say Nothing this film was a perfect companion, it really gets over the oppression of living in a religious, political and reactionary tinderbox. The points it loses are due to the sometimes uneven tone as the film weaves it’s numerous and complex strands.

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14 hours ago, Benny said:

Yes it was. Probably doesn't top Blue Velvet for me, but after processing it for about an hour it's definitely up there. David's a mad bastard.

Yeah, I can easily see why Blue Velvet remains the favoruite for a lot of people, and it has Frank Booth who is unmatched in many ways, but Mulholland Drive is peak Lynch for me: the wonderful story and plot switch, a whole load of memorable scenes and characters, Angelo Badalamenti's finest soundtrack, and buckets of dreamlike atmosphere. His other films may match/top it for some of those elements, but MD has pretty much everything I love - it's the complete package.

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My favourite scene in it was (extended Mulholland Drive thoughts follows):

 

Spoiler

When they are watching the cabaret, and the singer sings the most beautiful and heart wrenching song, only to "die" suddenly and the singing keeps going.

 

However: earlier on in the show the announcer literally tells the audience: "this is a recording". So you already know this is all an artifice, and yet, despite both us and the characters watching the show knowing that from the start, we all get swept up and emotionally affected by the singer's performance. Crushing reality comes back to us with a bang for both us and the characters when she collapses, and all emotional evolvement from our suspension of disbelief ceases. We were reminded that this was, after all, not real. And just as suddenly we realise this about the characters in the movie itself, right before all is unravelled.

 

On it's own I think that one scene essentially sums up the magic of cinema. How we are willing to be taken in by it and accepting of its emotional allure and power to move us, despite knowing, intellectually, that it's all a manipulation: a grand collective dreaming.

 

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1 hour ago, Benny said:

My favourite scene in it was:

 

  Hide contents

When they are watching the cabaret, and the singer sings the most beautiful and heart wrenching song, only to "die" suddenly and the singing keeps going.

 

However: earlier on in the show the announcer literally tells the audience: "this is a recording". So you already know this is all an artifice, and yet, despite both us and the characters watching the show knowing that from the start, we all get swept up and emotionally affected by the singer's performance. Crushing reality comes back to us with a bang for both us and the characters when she collapses, and all emotional evolvement from our suspension of disbelief ceases. We were reminded that this was, after all, not real. And just as suddenly we realise this about the characters in the movie itself, right before all is unravelled.

 

On it's own I think that one scene essentially sums up the magic of cinema. How we are willing to be taken in by it and accepting of its emotional allure and power to move us, despite knowing, intellectually, that it's all a manipulation: a grand collective dreaming.

 

That may well be my favourite scene in any film ever.

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