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Rate the last film you watched out of 5


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I feel like alot of what I post is old news to many :D

 

 

What we Do in Shadows

I watched an episode or two of the series and it didn't click that well with me so I wasn't sure about the film. For some reason it worked better for me as a film! Very funny for the most part and only sagged a bit when it got repetitious. For instance, and I know some will disagree, the police were funny the first time round but when they did it all over again I was just thinking "you already did this bit move on". Also the structure at times lost cohesion so things at times felt like sketches badly stitched together - an issue with the mockumentary framing but more obvious here.  Some great performances all round - I was going to sat that I prefer Taika Waititi behind the camera but the "spurter" just made me laugh like a drain :D

 

 

3/5 (stingy I know)

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1 hour ago, Clipper said:

For instance, and I know some will disagree, the police were funny the first time round but when they did it all over again I was just thinking "you already did this bit move on"

 

You'll love Wellington Paranormal! 

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I've got a long list of films I've watched and written Letterboxd reviews for in the last few months, but which I haven't posted here. Would anyone object if I dumped them in this thread in one go? :unsure:

 

For now, the last film I actually watched was...

 

Magnificent Warriors (1987) - 3.5/5

 

Michelle Yeoh kicks lots and lots of ass in a cool aviator jacket in this fun martial arts movie. Presumably its English title comes from the vaguely Seven Samurai/Magnificent Seven-esque plot about defending a Mongolian town (although by my count there are fewer than seven main heroes here). Towards the end, it increases in scale to become a full-blown war movie, but I think it's at its best in the smaller-scale fights.

 

Richard Ng plays a con man who gets caught up in events. He provides the broad comic relief, sometimes successfully (his introductory scene involves him getting into a fight and being cartoonishly kicked around like a football).

 

The filmmakers recorded one catchy musical fanfare to use in the action sequences, and by gum, they're going to get their money's worth from it if it's the last thing they do!

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OK, I'll post them. I'll start with the comedies...

 

 

A Night at the Opera (1935) - 3/5 (I know, I know, I'm sorry! :(

 

I confess I struggle a bit with the Marx Brothers' films. I can appreciate why they're well-regarded as comedy classics, but I haven't really loved any of those I've seen so far. (Though Duck Soup is long overdue a rewatch.)

 

Even when it comes to those famously quotable Groucho Marx one-liners, in many cases I find them funnier when written down in isolation than I do when they're delivered by the man himself in context. (My favourite from this film: "Everything about you reminds me of you. Except you. How do you account for that?")

 

To my surprise, the famous "sanity clause" punch line is delivered not by Groucho as I'd expected, but by Chico. A disguised Chico also gets to deliver some funny lines in his speech about flying over the Atlantic.

 

I can see why people complain that MGM watered down the brothers' comedy: the film periodically screeches to a halt to focus on two lovers' romance - and, worse, their song performances. One of their songs leads to an elaborate, lengthy, and tedious dance sequence. Fortunately, that musical number is immediately followed by comedy piano performances by Chico and Harpo, both of which are great fun, and then a serious harp performance by Harpo, which is very sweet.

 

People on the commentary and DVD bonus features gush over the stateroom scene, in which numerous people pile into a tiny room, but I preferred the impressively-coordinated farce of the bed-swapping/hiding routine later in the film.

 

 

Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story (2007) - 4/5
 

Quote

"I do believe in you. I just know you're gonna fail."

 

I really enjoyed this!

 

The songs in Walk Hard are not as overtly funny as those of some other musical comedies (Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping, The Rutles, A Mighty Wind, Josie and the Pussycats), but the comedy in between the songs had a very high hit rate. I liked Walk The Line, but this made me want to rewatch it to remind myself of all the biopic clichés being parodied.

 

The film has a running joke of ensuring that every encountered celebrity's name must be awkwardly shoehorned into the dialogue. It's a silly, predictable joke, but one that always tickles me. (The mid-2000s Channel 4 series Star Stories also used to do that - mostly because the impressions were so intentionally bad that there was otherwise no way of knowing who anyone was supposed to be - and I enjoyed it there too.)

 

My only issue is that the pace and quality of the jokes isn't sustained beyond about halfway through the film, after the India scene with a certain Popular Beat Combo. It still has funny moments after that, but they're less frequent and mostly not quite as good.

 

Here's a retrospective Rolling Stone article about the film: https://www.rollingstone.com/movies/movie-features/revisiting-hours-walk-hard-stream-this-movie-771426/

 

 

 

Best in Show (2000) - 3.5/5

At first I was disappointed that I didn't find this anywhere near as funny as A Mighty Wind. However, on rewatching it for the audio commentary, I realised how fond of it I'd quickly become: it's a consistently likeable film, even if it's rarely a hilarious one.

 

The first half has the occasional gently funny moment, but it really picks up when the dog show starts, introducing us to Fred Willard's gloriously inane commentary. Just as in A Mighty Wind, his bits are some of the film's highlights.

 

 

 

Stranger Than Fiction (2006) - 3/5
I've wanted to watch this for years. It has a fantastic concept: "man discovers he's a character in a book, and overhears the narrator saying he'll be killed off at the end of the story".

 

This movie functions for Will Ferrell as The Truman Show did for Jim Carrey: a comedian doing a high-concept movie about a man trapped in a story, playing it mostly straight, but with a few rare outbursts of outrageousness.

 

Unfortunately it didn't do as much with the concept as I'd hoped, instead focusing on Ferrell's romance with a Maggie Gyllenhaal's Manic Pix... er, I mean, Quirky Fairy Fantasy Lady.

 

And unfortunately I couldn't help asking questions about things that were not meant to make logical sense, and that the filmmakers were not interested in answering. For example:

Spoiler

Ferrell's behaviour is influenced by the fact he can hear the narration, but the book is not about a character who can hear his life narrated - so how does that work? And if this man's life is so dull and repetitive outside of the fact that he can hear narration, what's there to fill the other 100+ pages of the novel in order to make the book a "masterpiece"?

 

Just as in Being John Malkovich, the scenes establishing the weirdness of the premise are more interesting than the answers we finally get.

 

 

Ed Wood (1994) - 4.5/5

Tim Burton's best film? Yeah, probably.

 

Johnny Depp's best film? Probably also yes! His misguided, indefatigable enthusiasm throughout this film is consistently very funny.

 

On this viewing, the film's tone struck me as similar to the Coen Brothers' Golden Age movie-biz themed movies Barton Fink and Hail Caesar. (Particularly the scenes involving Glen or Glenda producer George Weiss.)

 

Also, it must be noted that Maurice LaMarche is pretty good at voicing Orson Welles.

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Triangle - 3/5

 

Fairly entertaining time loop story, although I think it takes a little too long to get started.

 

Nobody - 3/5

 

John Wick, but with Bob Odenkirk. Utterly ridiculous and quite good fun.

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Triangle (2011)

 

As mentioned above, it is slow to get going sure, but that's because it's setting everything up. There's a deep sense of unease from the very beginning of the film, and I had wondered about a few things early on:

Spoiler

That point about Jess zoning out when asked about her son was a red flag but I forgot about it soon after later on. There's also lots of clever things, like how Jess' change of clothes was initially explained by the paint stain, as opposed to a doppelganger showing up out of the blue and taking her place, and all of the evidence that Jess has been doing this for a really long time starting with the scribbled notes in pencil, before moving on to the pile of necklaces and then all of the Sally corpses.

 

So, who reckons that Jess killed her son at the very start?

 

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57 minutes ago, Talvalin said:

Triangle (2011)

 

As mentioned above, it is slow to get going sure, but that's because it's setting everything up. There's a deep sense of unease from the very beginning of the film, and I had wondered about a few things early on:

  Reveal hidden contents

That point about Jess zoning out when asked about her son was a red flag but I forgot about it soon after later on. There's also lots of clever things, like how Jess' change of clothes was initially explained by the paint stain, as opposed to a doppelganger showing up out of the blue and taking her place, and all of the evidence that Jess has been doing this for a really long time starting with the scribbled notes in pencil, before moving on to the pile of necklaces and then all of the Sally corpses.

 

So, who reckons that Jess killed her son at the very start?

 

 

Yeah it wasn't too major an issue, but

 

Spoiler

I thought they spent a bit too long setting up relationships and characters on the yacht which weren't really important to the story.

 

Once it got going, it was great!

 

I'm still not clear at what point she entered the loop, though. The actor plays the character as having no idea what was going on at the start of the film, suggesting that was her entry point, but then the pendants/paper/bodies indicated she'd already been through it at least 10-15 times.

 

I assumed they were going to go with a concussion from the car crash as the explanation for her not remembering, but the ending makes it clear she knows exactly what's going to happen and is deliberately going back in to try and repair things.

 

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Bad Trip - 2.5 out of 5

 

I really like Eric Andre but I don't know what you do with him. This Borat/Bad Grandpa type vechicle is'nt it.

 

Doesn't come close to how surreal and funny his TV show ever did either. He has something special in him but this is not it by long shot. 

 

 

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The Father - 4.5 out of 5

Near perfect drama about an ageing man's journey through the first steps of dementia.

Top notch acting, great direction and overall a uncomfortable watch, as intended. 

 

Nobody - 3.5 out of 5

This one is a bit hard to rate. I mean, it's very entertaining if you're into revenge flicks but I think the main problem is that it doesn't bring anything new to the genre. 

It quickly becomes very predictable but some of the action scenes and gore makes it a great popcorn flick for a lazy night in. 

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The Farewell (2019)

 

A beautifully made drama about white lies, emigration and family ties that was a little painful to watch at times. Anyone who says that Awkwafina can't act needs to watch this film, but in general it's a film that should be widely seen. That last shot though...

Spoiler

Were they trying to justify the entire premise of the film by showing that Nai-Nai was still alive 5 years and 8 months after she had been expected to die? If this is a Chinese cultural thing then it's not something that one can judge from the outside (and it was quite likely that Nai-Nai knew what was going on and decided to play along as well), but the fact remains that people don't just magically recover without some kind of medical treatment in the form of chemo, radiation and surgery. Given that it was evident throughout that she was receiving no such treatment because everyone (including the doctors!) were lying to her, I don't really get it.

 

4/5

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Triangle? I remember that.

Painfully average, flimsy horror version of groundhog day on a boat with plot holes the size of oceans.
I remember Melissa George's two front teeth blending into one and looking like one big tooth which was really distracting.

 

Honeydew - **
Deep Red - **
The Block Island Sound - **
The Vigil - **

 

Need something soaring and spicy to break my dull 2 star streak.

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This thread has made me want to watch Tenet again. 

 

I watched it at the cinema and it was my biggest cinematic disappointment in about 15 years. Its the only Nolan movie I don't have in my collection either. :(

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6 hours ago, ImmaculateClump said:

Triangle? I remember that.

Painfully average, flimsy horror version of groundhog day on a boat with plot holes the size of oceans.
I remember Melissa George's two front teeth blending into one and looking like one big tooth which was really distracting.

 

Honeydew - **
Deep Red - **
The Block Island Sound - **
The Vigil - **

 

Need something soaring and spicy to break my dull 2 star streak.

Is that Argento’s Deep red you are giving 2 stars? You need to quantify that a bit more. It’s a stone cold giallo classic. 

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I like a lot of his films, I even found stuff to like in mother of tears! but this one I didn't care for much.

 

I googled afterwards and it turned out that I'd watched the wrong cut, if that explains it.
The one I saw was veeeerrrry baggy.

I read that the people responsible for the remaster were just throwing in everything they found without considering for a moment that it might have been cut for a reason.

 

I think that's my fault for just diving in without researching, but I do like to go into stuff as blind as I can.

 

it could be down to that, there was a hell of a lot of downtime and people wandering around looking bewildered, it sapped all the tension and when things did happen, I was well past caring.

 

Some nice moments, great score by goblin as usual, some unintentional laughs, but I found it mostly boring to be honest and didn't think it hung together well at all, but again, this doesn't seem to have been a director sanctioned cut.

 

Oh, another thing, I didn't have time to watch it all in one sitting and had to watch it over the space of two nights which probably didn't help, I felt like I was rushed when, for that cut at least, it's probably something you'd have to relax and bathe in.

 

You never know, I might revisit it in the future in it's intended form and have a total change of heart.

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The Boys from Brazil

 

A daft and predictable thriller. I loved it! Olivier vs Peck!  It’s so utterly preposterous but the cast are brilliant and I love these “what the nazis did next” movies. 
 

4/5

 

House

 

A wildly entertaining 80s comedy horror with Norm from Cheers. It’s frenetic and bonkers with at least one great jump scare. 
 

4/5

 

Hobbs and Shaw

 

I thought this was good but also 20 minutes too long. It could have had a fair bit of fat trimmed off it. Why are these blockbusters all 2 hours plus? Surely if they were all 30 minutes shorter you could get more viewings in each day at the cinema?  
 

Also, I’m not a fan of Elba since he started doing those Sky ads. I find them deeply annoying and they have made me reassess his entire career and I now think he is pretty average at best. 
 

Still, Johnson and Statham are brilliant and the action is well shot and has a nice kinetic flow.

 

3/5
 

 

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Love & Monsters

 

A pretty good monster film. The action was fun and the quippy dialogue didn't annoy me too much. Some really nice character moments but a bit too much schmaltz hence my lower rating.

 

Great "monster" effects though, really sold the whole thing. The world building was solid and it looked and felt and sounded really grounded (despite the "monsters") which I liked. Michael Rooker was top value as ever with the rest of the main cast holding their own well. The erm crew towards the end were the worst acting part and the worst part of the film striking a bit of an odd note.

 

It has elements borrowed from zombieland but it was its own thing in the end. It almost played out like a teen drama and reminded me of a grownup version of The Last Kids on Earth (if you have kids you have probably heard of it :D )

 

A fun flick.

 

3/5

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Was Rooker playing an arsehole? I watched The Bone Collector recently and unsurprisingly, he was the arsehole police captain getting in the way of the dynamic duo of Denzel Washington and Angelina Jolie. I mean, why wouldn't you let a rookie cop with no training examine crime scenes alone? Makes perfect sense to me.

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4 hours ago, Talvalin said:

Was Rooker playing an arsehole? I watched The Bone Collector recently and unsurprisingly, he was the arsehole police captain getting in the way of the dynamic duo of Denzel Washington and Angelina Jolie. I mean, why wouldn't you let a rookie cop with no training examine crime scenes alone? Makes perfect sense to me.

Surprisingly, no, which is why I mentioned the performance. Still within that range/dynamic but with a wee bit more beneath the surface.

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