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Classic rave footage

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Do we have a thread for this? I’ll put this video from Shelley’s in 1992 here anyway.

3.50 onwards in particular. I found this on the recent BBC doc Everybody In The Place and it sent me off on a massive nostalgia trip. You could never recreate this. So ephemeral. The moment is precious.

 

Maybe I’m talking to myself. 

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I was at Shelley's when Altern8 were making a music video outside on the back of a Bedfrord truck and although I loved their music we scoffed at the masks and glow sticks and all that stuff. I also appeared on the Fantazia One Step Beyond footage at Donington Park from 1992, though you can only really make out my Berghaus jacket thanks to the VHS quality. The BBC (I think) used some footage from that event for a documentary about ecstasy which showed everyone queuing up before the start and a shot of me and a mate (who looked a little out of it, my mate not me) and dozens of others waiting to get in. I always remember it airing around 6pm on a weekday unbeknown to me, and my mum, dad and younger sister shouting upstairs that I was on the telly and it was about drugs.

 

 

The last large Rave I ever went to, I was fucking burnt out by then.

 

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That’s amazing amc. Sounds like you were right in it around the time it peaked. I actually watched that Altern-8 video yesterday!

 

A lot of people have probably seen this video from Fantasia NYE1993 as seems to do the rounds on social media quite regularly. It definitely captures a moment though. The girl who features prominently in it appeared in the comments of it on Facebook once. Seems she eventually came down and is a Home Counties mother in her forties now.
 

 

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Just watched Everybody in the Place, which I think inspired this thread. Fascinating stuff for an old geezer like me who remembers going out in his travel fox trainers and stüssy t shirt. 

 

But context is everything. The bloke who was explaining to kids in 2019 what 1989 was like and the looks on their faces. 

 

And then you realise it was 30 years ago!  30 years. 

 

To me it wasn’t very long ago at all, but it’s like explaining to a kid in 1989 what 1959 was like. 

 

That's terrifying! 

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It is scary but also a little sad in that 1959 was about rock n roll, 69 hippies n drugs, 79 punk, 89 rave. Todays kids have what, social media? <_<

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You're probably right, I'm defintely too old. There is defintely culture and great music/art though, but where is the counter culture? Again I'm probably too old. 

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It still has a special place in my heart but I've finally reached the point where I'd be embarrassed/scared to play "hardcore" to someone who's never heard it, as I know it probably sounds ridiculous to them now.

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I guess you've got to remember all of those things were commercial in the end. We're probably just at the tail end of something counter culture like grime coming from lads on an estate, making things in their bedrooms and becoming these huge cultural phenomenons until it burns out. It'll be something else next – jazz from South London maybe? Stranger things have happened. 

 

All music movements from the past have been recontextualised over time too. It's not like everyone was at Helter Skelter necking pingers. We could be in the midst of something right now and we probably won't know for 10 years what it was. Be too old to care too probably.

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Yeah I suppose Grime counts, but I don't think there's been anything that's resonated as much culturally since rave and the dance music revolution - definitely felt like the last big proletariat movement. 

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Even that 90s dance music revolution only captured a subset. The rest of the country was bollocking along to Blur, Oasis, Pulp and Britpop/indie stuff.

 

I suspect you're/we're just old and out of touch. Grime, the reggaeton stuff I don't really understand what it even is, drill music are all there bubbling away.

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Yeah it was only short-lived really, by the time Brit Pop had arrived it had already been consumed and monetised by the super clubs and their 'superstar DJ's'. 

 

I suppose now we just listen to music in such different ways. Back then I'd be in all sorts of obscure record shops and clubs, travelling all over the place. Now I can just stream it all on my phone. So I suppose that's the real revolution, the proliferation of all kinds of music and sub genres without any boundaries.

 

I mean i can't honestly say I'm a grime fan, or whatever, but I certainly have easy access to it - I'm aware of it.

 

Still seems like techno is on the up though, there's loads of amazing music about.

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Oh man, lots of happy memories there. Was very much 1990 onwards in Manchester, Leeds and beyond for me and friends. Plus lots and lots of free parties (DiY, Smokecreen etc) out in the woods/quarries/airfields/beaches/wherever (Castlemorton madness!).  :D

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