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Digital Pressure Cookers

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Anyone use something like this:

 

https://www.argos.co.uk/product/5550067

 

Looks like a good combination of Slow Cooker, pressure cooker, rice cooker etc, can anyone recommend or let me know if there is better alternatives?

 

My old slow cooker is on the way out so feel like replacing it with something more capable would be a win.

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There was a thread about these not so long ago:

Consensus seemed to be that they are pretty good. I'm looking to get one at some point.

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They're great. But they sacrifice a bit of space for other functions. If you just want a slow cooker then just get a slow cooker. If you want to experiment, then these things are the bomb. 

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Well I bought one from John Lewis, the Pressure King Pro 5l 12 in 1. Got all my ingredients to make a beef stroganoff. And it doesn't work. Doesn't seem to heat up at all. Even on "browning" mode, never mind the actual pressure cooker options with the lid on. So that's annoying.

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We've got an Instant Pot and I don't think we really know what to use it for. Slow cooking - we've a slow cooker. Rice - we ended up getting a rice cooker, which does a much better job of it. I need to try some pressure cooking I guess.

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Serious Eats website has some good pressure cooker recipes but I use mine pretty selectively  - I made up my chicken enchilada filling in mine at the weekend which is really tasty. I also like it for making daal, gives great results.

 

I'm not a total convert to pressure cookers though, for most stews/ragu prefer a longer simmering with the sauce thickening up naturally and some nice browning going on. Once you open a pressurised lid you've got 100% of your original liquid and zero Maillard reaction in that hot wet environment.

 

The enchiladas works as is the first stage and cooks up the sauce and chicken at same time - but I've never really taken to stews/soups which come straight out the pressure cooker ready to eat.

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On 08/05/2019 at 10:41, Gotters said:

I'm not a total convert to pressure cookers though, for most stews/ragu prefer a longer simmering with the sauce thickening up naturally and some nice browning going on. Once you open a pressurised lid you've got 100% of your original liquid and zero Maillard reaction in that hot wet environment.

 

I like our instant pot but we've mostly been using it for rice. I did a beef ragu I was quite happy with, and just spent a lot of time searing the beef on a really hot cast iron pan to start with. 

 

It wasn't as good as when I would cook the ragu for hours, and I've made mistakes on other dishes where my instinct was to add a little water and it ended up really watery. But, it was good, and quite edible, but it did take something like 40 mins on a weekday, rather than 8 hours on a weekend day. So it is a nice convenience thing.

 

But, I really need to make more of it. Will check out Serious eats, thanks

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The pressure cooker functionality is mainly used for stock for me. I don't eat meat very often these days, but whenever I do I will use the bones to make a batch of stock.

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We have one of these and the recipe book it came with had a banging risotto recipe which takes about 20 minutes from start to finish.

 

The fact you can cook the bacon and onions down in the thing before adding the rice & stock and switching it over to pressure cooker mode is awesome. 

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After looking in Gotters' batch cooking thread I've been trying to convince myself I don't need a digital pressure cooker.

 

I've noticed the Pressure King in Argos and obviously the Instant Pot seems to be the ubiquitous brand.

 

Any major downsides to the Pressure King when compared with the Instant Pot?

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I can't speak functionally but the biggest benefit of having an Instant Pot is most of the sites, videos & recipes covering slow/pressure cooking are making the recipes in an instant pot - so the timings and modes are dead simple to get the hang of with no conversion needed.

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Pressure king I believe has a non stick Teflon pot. 

 

Instant pot is a stainless steel thing. 

 

When non stick Teflon things become scratched and no longer non stick they seem to become "very much stick" so for me, that was the deal breaker. Not sure if that's valid but that's why I got an instant pot 

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On 08/05/2019 at 10:41, Gotters said:

I'm not a total convert to pressure cookers though, for most stews/ragu prefer a longer simmering with the sauce thickening up naturally and some nice browning going on. Once you open a pressurised lid you've got 100% of your original liquid and zero Maillard reaction in that hot wet environment.

 

This is why I've never bought one. I just use my trusty large stainless steel (I think) pot to cook everything in.

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