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Chernobyl (HBO/Sky)

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19 hours ago, emerald fox said:

I feel like I might be the only one that didn't find the pet shooting scenes that tough and was a bit 'so what' about the puppies, which is odd considering how much I love dogs, whereas I found the dog running after the bus during the evacuation in an earlier episode utterly heartbreaking.

 

I guess for me it was the point of abandonment, rather the point of what is arguably euthanasia.

 

Same here, I love animals but that didn’t effect me either, but the dog running did. I think it was because the way it was filmed; them responding to the whistles; it was almost like feral animals running through the grass rather than a loving pet thinking his master was home.

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On 28/05/2019 at 00:23, dumpster said:

 

They are still in use as of 3 weeks ago.

 

 

 

 

59721_10151521224239274_1054177188_n.jpg

 

This seems crazy to me, that the exact same equipment is still being used to detect radiation. It just seems completely unreal that anything from then would still be used in this capacity.

 

Episode four had some incredibly beautifully shot and composed scenes, bleak as all hell of course but still beautiful. I'd love to see a breakdown of the CGI and location work and how they comped all this together, it's so seamless and tastefully done. Really gorgeous colour grading and photography.

 

 

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11 hours ago, Mawdlin said:

One terrible thing about this is that it's going to be all finished by next week.

 

I find it amusing thinking "fuck, I'd love some more Chernobyl".

 

 

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51 minutes ago, Fry Crayola said:

 

I find it amusing thinking "fuck, I'd love some more Chernobyl".

 

 

 

I've been Youtubing. Watched this earlier, good explanation of the nuclear process and cooling and how the Japanese approached the aftermath in a different way.

 

 

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9 hours ago, Uncle Nasty said:

 

This seems crazy to me, that the exact same equipment is still being used to detect radiation. It just seems completely unreal that anything from then would still be used in this capacity.

 

Episode four had some incredibly beautifully shot and composed scenes, bleak as all hell of course but still beautiful. I'd love to see a breakdown of the CGI and location work and how they comped all this together, it's so seamless and tastefully done. Really gorgeous colour grading and photography.

 

 

Can't beat good old analogue Physics kit though. All my favourite kit was made in the 50/60s. Easy to fix and well made.

 

Geiger counters are quite simple, and the simplest detector (spark detector) is just some parallel wires with a PD across them. 

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On 15/05/2019 at 17:43, Joystick Chevron said:

On a slightly cheerier note, the guy who held the door in episode one did survive, though he needed months of blood and plasma tranfusions and skin grafts and Christ knows what.

 

Quote

In Moscow, Yuvchenko is still recovering from the single minute he spent holding open the door for his friends in the early hours of 26 April 1986. That night, when they put him on the plane to Hospital No 6, he thought he would be in the Moscow clinic for a few days. 'It turned out to take a year,' he says. 'And the rest of my life.' The door into the reactor hall had been covered with radioactive dust; Yuvchenko's clothes were soaking wet from steam and escaping cooling water. Where his left shoulder, hip and calf touched the door, he suffered terrible beta and gamma radiation burns. His skin turned black and sloughed off; his left arm was in bandages for seven years. Today his arms and back are scarred violet-red with the results of skin grafting operations so numerous he stopped counting at 15. He doesn't know if the radiation made him infertile, but he and his wife Natalia were advised not to try to have any more children, as a result of possible DNA damage. He still has two weeks of check-ups every year.

 

That's from this piece from the Guardian in 2006, written by the author of Midnight in Chernobyl.

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I really want to watch this but I'm also very nervous about doing so. As someone who never entirely recovered from watching Threads (which in all sincerity fucking traumatised me for a good couple of weeks afterwards) are the scenes of nuclear carnage in this likely to fuck me up?

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10 minutes ago, ann coulter said:

I really want to watch this but I'm also very nervous about doing so. As someone who never entirely recovered from watching Threads (which in all sincerity fucking traumatised me for a good couple of weeks afterwards) are the scenes of nuclear carnage in this likely to fuck me up?

 

I wouldn't have said so, no.
Threads, The War Game or On The Beach are disturbing because they show how easily our civilisation could fall apart through war but I didn't get that sense from this.

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3 hours ago, Vespa Alex said:

 

I wouldn't have said so, no.
Threads, The War Game or On The Beach are disturbing because they show how easily our civilisation could fall apart through war but I didn't get that sense from this.

 

I actually find this more terrifying as, in the absolute  worst case scenario, there was potential for this to have escalated into a global life ending event. And that wouldn't be through mankind's willingness to destroy itself through war, but by accident (albeit with the risk amplified by pride and damaging bureaucracy). Which seems much more terrifying as such an event could still, potentially, happen at any moment.

 

It does become quite graphic in places too @ann coulter but there is a certain (small) detachment through it being remote and at an installation rather than the familiarity of Sheffield.

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Fucking hell he's come a long way since this one. I remember it being on in every pub and bar I'd spend more than 30 minutes in back in the day.

 

 

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On 29/05/2019 at 09:57, Fry Crayola said:

The roof scene was absolutely gripping. The tension was such that I felt near convinced that something absolutely awful was going to happen - that one of the liquidators would look into the core, or even worse fall off the roof into the bloody thing when tossing their graphite. Yet it doesn't, because the worst thing has already happened - they're on the roof.

 

The excellent live tweets from Dr Claire Corkhill, linked by Fireproofradiator earlier in the thread, add another layer to the show, much like the podcast. 

 

 

 

 

I don't think that's caused by radiation - it's almost certainly bromide drag resulting from improper development of the film. Those streaks correspond with the sprocket holes on the 35mm film frame.

 

See this Google Images search for loads more examples.

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5 hours ago, amc said:

Fucking hell he's come a long way since this one. I remember it being on in every pub and bar I'd spend more than 30 minutes in back in the day.

 

 

 

Oh Jesus I used to bloody hate that when it was on MTV every five minutes!

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55 minutes ago, FishyFish said:

 

I don't think that's caused by radiation - it's almost certainly bromide drag resulting from improper development of the film. Those streaks correspond with the sprocket holes on the 35mm film frame.

 

See this Google Images search for loads more examples.

Yeah I concur. It looks like light exposure. Probably a bit of urban myth about it 

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1 hour ago, kerraig UK said:

Yeah I concur. It looks like light exposure. Probably a bit of urban myth about it 

 

Plus the fact that images are inverted when projected onto the film (they're only the right way up when looking through the viewfinder because of the prism in the camera), so the section of the film where those streaks appear would have been at the top of the camera body when the shot was taken.

 

<applies for a job on Mythbusters..>

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Ah. I assumed the white streak referenced wasn’t the ‘light bleed’ at the bottom, but the very thin vertical white line near centre frame. It runs right in front of and partially through the right hand of the pole guy in the darker suit rear/centre frame. The line also passes in front of the stretcher. It’s very subtle.

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She got corrected pretty soon after making the tweet. One person even stated please don't spread misinformation whilst correcting her. I thought it a bit harsh but then she is a nuclear waste researcher.

 

Radiation can cause bleach like streaks to film though, going by my quick google search.

 

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21 minutes ago, jonamok said:

Ah. I assumed the white streak referenced wasn’t the ‘light bleed’ at the bottom, but the very thin vertical white line near centre frame. It runs right in front of and partially through the right hand of the pole guy in the darker suit rear/centre frame. The line also passes in front of the stretcher. It’s very subtle.

 

Thats neg dirt. Dirt on the print appears black, but dirt on the neg will print as white, because it's a negative. I imagine that conditions were very dirty where the film was loaded.

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On 28/05/2019 at 20:08, Tempy said:

Regarding the pregnant lady, apart from the fact she loves and wants to comfort her husband, it’s covered in the podcast and easy to forget that back then people didn’t understand radiation and the danger. If you knew a fire was burning at a nuclear power station would you go close to watch it? Absolutely not, but they did back then.

 

I can believe that may have been the case in Soviet Russia but there was plenty of paranoia about it here where people were perhaps more aware due to things like Threads and a generally more open situation I suppose. I remember my mum going round the house closing all the curtains when the news got out. Nothing like a thin layer of material across your 1980s single glazed windows to keep the radiation out.

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It's been mentioned already but I'll add to the comments that the Chernobyl podcast is worth a listen, to get a real feel for the differences between real life and the show, for example...

those three lads that went down into the flooded lower levels to open the gates, their battery powered lights go out at the end of episode 2 and the start of episode 3 has them using the back up mechanical torches. In reality they didn't have the mechanical torches and had to find their way around in the dark after their torches failed! Crazy. The mechanical torches were only added so we could see what they were doing on screen.

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Masterful stuff from the writer. The truth aspect shone through from almost the first minute of the first episode. And just continually assaults you there after. 

 

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Special appearance from 

Spoiler

knock-off Mickey Mouse featured in one of the links posted with photos. 

They’re going above and beyond with the detail. 

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7 hours ago, gizmo1990 said:

Masterful stuff from the writer. The truth aspect shone through from almost the first minute of the first episode. And just continually assaults you there after. 

 

 

Great interview. He knows he's written a human masterpiece, because he put the work in. He wants his TV show to change humanity. As well it should. Because it is about how we get ourselves in trouble with our own humanity.

This is in the top 5 dramas of all time.

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Perfect TV. Absolutely flawless. Really great piece of work by all involved from the writers directors and cast, even the producers.

 

They didn't cheapen it in any way. Didn't try to squeeze more episodes out of it than were necessary, didn't try to sensationalize it, or cram in a love story, or a gratuitous sex scene or any violence. They just let the story stand for itself.

 

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