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Gaming Myths

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26 minutes ago, deerokus said:

Everyone swearing that you can 'be Goro' in original MK. 

 

I’ll show ye how it’s fukken done

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8 hours ago, Floshenbarnical said:

Being able to get to Carcer City in GTAIII.

 

Is this the city from the opening cinematic? It’s true that you can go there, you just can’t walk around it. 

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I remember when a friend told us about friendships in Mortal Kombat 2. Lui Kang would give you cake,  Jonny Cage signs an autograph.

 

We all laughed our heads off at the stupidity of it and told him to fuck off and make up something more believable.

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, probotector said:

I remember when a friend told us about friendships in Mortal Kombat 2. Lui Kang would give you cake,  Jonny Cage signs an autograph.

 

We all laughed our heads off at the stupidity of it and told him to fuck off and make up something more believable.

 

 

 

 

It’s ironic that you and all of your friends laughed at this other friend of yours and told him to fuck off. Pretty sure Shang Tsung’s Friendship move involved him laughing at his opponent and telling them to fuck off.

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It was assumed to be a myth as I remember, but then turned out to be true. Sega Chris Benoit'd him. It's quite a bit more complicated than that, and is an interesting story - this video is very good on the subject. 

 

 

 

I love that the composer of the previous games got too expensive, so they went for the presumably cheaper Michael Jackson + his team. 

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3 hours ago, Popo said:

 

Is this the city from the opening cinematic? It’s true that you can go there, you just can’t walk around it. 

 

It is the city from Manhunt, and possibly you’re right. I can’t remember. I think it is the Jersey City analog so it would make sense. I was told that you get there through that tunnel in the north of the third island near the dam. 

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I just checked and the opening scene is supposed to just be another area of Liberty City, albeit not one accessible as part of the three islands. 

 

Never the less, with skilled and careful operation of the dodo it’s possible to fly there - it’s located miles away from the play area close to the boundary of the game world. It exists only for the purpose of the opening cinematic so you can’t land on it and walk around as you’d just clip through it and plummet to your death but it is quite eerie to fly around and fun to see something the developers never intended you to. 

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Speaking of GTA3 and the Dodo, I remember reading at the time that the reason it couldn't fly properly was because Rockstar (or was 3 developed by DMA?) didn't want people to replicate 9/11. I always assumed that to be true (and sensible as there would have been enough bad press surrounding what you could do in the game) but has anyone ever confirmed it?

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Unlikely. It was released just a month later. I assume the game would have been finished, or just about, on 9/11. I seem to remember there were things when viewed from above that made it obvious that it was never designed to be properly flown over. 

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The great videogame crash of the early 80s did happen in the UK. I remember it well. We owned one of the first Atari 2600s , and used to make a special trip to a store in Preston to get a new game. I remember my mum was furious because games were an astonishing £30 each. We came home from one trip with Super Breakout and some Paddle controllers and she hit the roof.  Meanwhile, time went on and friends started getting Spectrums. New games were £5.95 and of course you could copy them off your mates in the playground. I still thought the Atari.had better sound and colour, but we couldn't compete with the sheer volume of games that friends had. However what we did notice was that Atari cartridges were available all over the place and there were hundreds of choices if you didn't mind spending £30 a pop. There were games by companies we'd never heard of and generic titles like "space attack" that told you nothing. We didn't have to to Preston any more because there was no need, but that day we spent £30 on ET, a game we played for hours and even did speed runs on, was the day we realised that these games were just being churned out by publishers as quick as possible. And suddenly, sales slowed down so much and we started to see all this generic shovelware being reduced to ridiculous prices. We picked up utter shite like 3D tic tac toe for 1.99, loads of stuff by Imagic, and basically the whole saturated market just imploded. Meanwhile, it didn't seem as noticable in the UK because so many of us had 8 bit computers instead of consoles but if you owned a console you definitely saw it.  Then as the dust settled, the NES came out and the console market started again.

 

On the subject of Myths, typing DavidJBroadhurst on the title screen of Amiga LED Storm supposedly unlocked cheats. Bollocks. All the mags printed it, typed it over and over again. Did it balls.

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1 hour ago, wev said:

Speaking of GTA3 and the Dodo, I remember reading at the time that the reason it couldn't fly properly was because Rockstar (or was 3 developed by DMA?) didn't want people to replicate 9/11. I always assumed that to be true (and sensible as there would have been enough bad press surrounding what you could do in the game) but has anyone ever confirmed it?

 

Confirmed as a myth, see below article:

 

https://www.pcgamer.com/uk/piloting-the-dodo-the-ship-that-was-never-meant-to-fly-in-grand-theft-auto-3/

 

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4 minutes ago, Fry Crayola said:

A little off-topic, but learning to fly the Dodo was one of my favourite game experiences. 

I got really good at that. Used to fly round the whole map.

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32 minutes ago, Fry Crayola said:

A little off-topic, but learning to fly the Dodo was one of my favourite game experiences. 

 

God yes. Nothing more gleeful than flying through the air in the dodo. The whole time I had a grin on my face while thinking I’m not supposed to be here! 

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2 hours ago, dumpster said:

The great videogame crash of the early 80s did happen in the UK. I remember it well. We owned one of the first Atari 2600s , and used to make a special trip to a store in Preston to get a new game. I remember my mum was furious because games were an astonishing £30 each. We came home from one trip with Super Breakout and some Paddle controllers and she hit the roof.  Meanwhile, time went on and friends started getting Spectrums. New games were £5.95 and of course you could copy them off your mates in the playground. I still thought the Atari.had better sound and colour, but we couldn't compete with the sheer volume of games that friends had. However what we did notice was that Atari cartridges were available all over the place and there were hundreds of choices if you didn't mind spending £30 a pop. There were games by companies we'd never heard of and generic titles like "space attack" that told you nothing. We didn't have to to Preston any more because there was no need, but that day we spent £30 on ET, a game we played for hours and even did speed runs on, was the day we realised that these games were just being churned out by publishers as quick as possible. And suddenly, sales slowed down so much and we started to see all this generic shovelware being reduced to ridiculous prices. We picked up utter shite like 3D tic tac toe for 1.99, loads of stuff by Imagic, and basically the whole saturated market just imploded. Meanwhile, it didn't seem as noticable in the UK because so many of us had 8 bit computers instead of consoles but if you owned a console you definitely saw it.  Then as the dust settled, the NES came out and the console market started again.

 

 

So the 2600 was superceded by micro computers in the UK and as a result Atari cartridges were no longer selling and were thus reduced in price? That's not really a videogame crash is it?

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Remember the great video game crash of 1991 when they also stopped making games for the GX4000? It was a horrible time. Of course every body else had Amigas and Atari STs and Mega Drives and stuff so just continued as they were, but it was a very real crash for GX4000 owners and the industry ground to a halt for maybe as many as three picoseconds.

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57 minutes ago, Fry Crayola said:

A little off-topic, but learning to fly the Dodo was one of my favourite game experiences. 

 

Watching this makes it look like a 3D precursor to Flappy Bird.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Simbo said:

Someone opening your bedroom door whilst a game was loading causing an R Tape loading error, 0:1

 

You spend ages getting the volume control just right, sitting deadly still and silent allowing sufficient tape loading karma to build up in the room ... then someone opens your door

 

Pfft, C64 and ZX owners versed in chuntey rituals would leave the room - ideally standing outside the door with their arm stretched out when they hit play on the tape.

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2 hours ago, Simbo said:

Someone opening your bedroom door whilst a game was loading causing an R Tape loading error, 0:1

 

You spend ages getting the volume control just right, sitting deadly still and silent allowing sufficient tape loading karma to build up in the room ... then someone opens your door

 

Did you leave the joystick plugged in in anticipation? That could have been where you were going wrong.

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4 hours ago, Camel said:

 

So the 2600 was superceded by micro computers in the UK and as a result Atari cartridges were no longer selling and were thus reduced in price? That's not really a videogame crash is it?

 

No, the market became saturated by hundreds of duff games, on sale everywhere, all really expensive, and all the shops sold them off cheap and dropped the format completely.  

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Which still isn't a crash, as the industry in the UK wasn't based primarily around consoles as was the case in the US. Atari owners saw their format collapse. Everyone else shrugged and got on with making games.

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6 hours ago, dumpster said:

The great videogame crash of the early 80s did happen in the UK. I remember it well. We owned one of the first Atari 2600s , and used to make a special trip to a store in Preston to get a new game. I remember my mum was furious because games were an astonishing £30 each. We came home from one trip with Super Breakout and some Paddle controllers and she hit the roof.  Meanwhile, time went on and friends started getting Spectrums. New games were £5.95 and of course you could copy them off your mates in the playground. I still thought the Atari.had better sound and colour, but we couldn't compete with the sheer volume of games that friends had. However what we did notice was that Atari cartridges were available all over the place and there were hundreds of choices if you didn't mind spending £30 a pop. There were games by companies we'd never heard of and generic titles like "space attack" that told you nothing. We didn't have to to Preston any more because there was no need, but that day we spent £30 on ET, a game we played for hours and even did speed runs on, was the day we realised that these games were just being churned out by publishers as quick as possible. And suddenly, sales slowed down so much and we started to see all this generic shovelware being reduced to ridiculous prices. We picked up utter shite like 3D tic tac toe for 1.99, loads of stuff by Imagic, and basically the whole saturated market just imploded. Meanwhile, it didn't seem as noticable in the UK because so many of us had 8 bit computers instead of consoles but if you owned a console you definitely saw it.  Then as the dust settled, the NES came out and the console market started again.

 

On the subject of Myths, typing DavidJBroadhurst on the title screen of Amiga LED Storm supposedly unlocked cheats. Bollocks. All the mags printed it, typed it over and over again. Did it balls.

 

Ah, isn't that linked to the downfall of Imagine software and not some really, really dodgy accounting/shit business practice?

 

I'm very much enjoying this new format for Mythbusters!

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1 hour ago, Benny said:

 

Did you leave the joystick plugged in in anticipation? That could have been where you were going wrong.

 

Never used a joystick ever on the old 48k just didn't feel right.

 

QAOP and M most times although I did prefer 67890 for certain games though, on reflection, I've no idea why.  

 

Do remember having a screwdriver and constantly mucking about with the tape head.  

 

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