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The Beatles: Get Back - Peter Jackson Beatles documentary


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10 hours ago, Graham S said:

And now I’m leafing through the coffee table book. 
 

Paul “Even a Tunisian amphitheatre can be boring. I don’t dig underestimating what’s here. You should get really close up, like right into one of John’s eyes. Can you do that?”

Michael “I just thought of going to Africa because we colonised it.”

 

He comes across as a right prat during every scene he's in. I'm surprised they tolerated him. Especially Lennon and Harrison.

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Finished the documentary, and pretty gutted it ended. I wish we could have seen them complete the rest of the songs for the album but overall I could easily could have done with more.  Going to watch Let it Be, then a rewatch of the Beatles Anthology.

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I also finished it last night and my only complaint is that it didn’t end with another montage similar to the introduction, covering what happened afterwards through Abbey Road, Paul leaving, Spector’s involvement, the belated release of Let It Be and the band splitting.

 

Otherwise I wasn’t expecting it but I don’t think I could have been more captivated by hours of footage of a bunch of blokes sitting around chatting and occasionally creating music. The Beatles simultaneously invented and perfected Reality TV.

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I've only done ep 1 but my favourite bit so far was George's "I watched this programme that had people dancing on it last night so I wrote this new song in waltz time. It's called 'Everyone Around Me Is A Self-Important Shithead'. Oh hi Paul, do you want a listen?"

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I just finished it. Maybe the best music film ever made. Certainly up there with The Last Waltz for me, which I know is arguably a different genre.

 

I've watched that rooftop gig so many times, but seeing the full version in this context changes it completely and it's so emotionally evocative. You really get a sense that when they performed together, all of the politics and distraction disappeared in an instant.

A few thoughts: 

 

1. The stalling of the police in the reception area is genuinely hilarious. 
2. The delight in McCartney's face when he spots the police on the roof is amazing. He's like an overjoyed kid. 
3. George's "fuck you" to the police when he defiantly plugs his amp back in is super cool. 
4. Billy Preston really deserves so much credit for his contribution to both this and Abbey Road.

5. 1969 George Harrison was a seriously stylish gentleman. 
6. John's last line "I hope we passed the audition" might be one of the great sign off's.
7. The conflict in the police is so apparent. 
8. Mad to think how good Lennon was when he turned it on, especially as he was apparently dabbling in heroin at the time.
9. How good is Glyn Johns? The quality of the rooftop recordings alone are really astounding. And I had no idea George Martin was so involved with this album.
 

What a ride!

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2 hours ago, Scratchy Bollock said:

I just finished it. Maybe the best music film ever made. Certainly up there with The Last Waltz for me, which I know is arguably a different genre.

 

I've watched that rooftop gig so many times, but seeing the full version in this context changes it completely and it's so emotionally evocative. You really get a sense that when they performed together, all of the politics and distraction disappeared in an instant.

A few thoughts: 

 

1. The stalling of the police in the reception area is genuinely hilarious. 
2. The delight in McCartney's face when he spots the police on the roof is amazing. He's like an overjoyed kid. 
3. George's "fuck you" to the police when he defiantly plugs his amp back in is super cool. 
4. Billy Preston really deserves so much credit for his contribution to both this and Abbey Road.

5. 1969 George Harrison was a seriously stylish gentleman. 
6. John's last line "I hope we passed the audition" might be one of the great sign off's.
7. The conflict in the police is so apparent. 
8. Mad to think how good Lennon was when he turned it on, especially as he was apparently dabbling in heroin at the time.
9. How good is Glyn Johns? The quality of the rooftop recordings alone are really astounding. And I had no idea George Martin was so involved with this album.
 

What a ride!

It was Mal who switched off the amps on the request from the police, I watched it again and didn't see them going anywhere near them.

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25 minutes ago, yakumo said:

Young Glyn Jones looked like Cillian Murphy.

 

Besides from the anthology and The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years, anything else people recommend and any other music documentaries too?.

Scorsese’s George doc, Living in the Material World is pretty good. 
 

Last night I re-watched the Rutles spoof All You Need Is Cash and especially if you’ve recently watched Anthology so you can see how much care and attention went into it it might be worth a look. Some of the Python adjacent jokes have dated a bit now, but Neil Innes’s songs still hold up and to my mind the likes of Cheese and Onions, Ouch! and Doubleback Alley are official Beatles songs.

 

Expanding things out a bit, a re-listen as you make you way through Revolution in the Head will open up new insights (even if Paul says it’s bollocks).

 

I’ve really enjoyed over lockdown discovering the solo Beatles records, guided by the I am the Eggpod podcast and there are plenty of gems scattered throughout although the quality varies much more than the Beatles years. 

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6 hours ago, yakumo said:

 

 

Besides from the anthology and The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years, anything else people recommend and any other music documentaries too?.


McCartney 321 is really good. It covers fairly familiar territory but McCartney and Rick Rubin are fine company. 

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6 hours ago, yakumo said:

Young Glyn Jones looked like Cillian Murphy.

 

Besides from the anthology and The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years, anything else people recommend and any other music documentaries too?.

Summer of Soul on Disney is excellent. 
Also, 1971, Beastie Boys Story, Watch The Sound and The Velvet Underground all on Apple+.

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11 hours ago, Graham S said:

Scorsese’s George doc, Living in the Material World is pretty good. 
 

Last night I re-watched the Rutles spoof All You Need Is Cash and especially if you’ve recently watched Anthology so you can see how much care and attention went into it it might be worth a look. Some of the Python adjacent jokes have dated a bit now, but Neil Innes’s songs still hold up and to my mind the likes of Cheese and Onions, Ouch! and Doubleback Alley are official Beatles songs.

 

Expanding things out a bit, a re-listen as you make you way through Revolution in the Head will open up new insights (even if Paul says it’s bollocks).

 

I’ve really enjoyed over lockdown discovering the solo Beatles records, guided by the I am the Eggpod podcast and there are plenty of gems scattered throughout although the quality varies much more than the Beatles years. 

 

Is the Rutles doc streaming anywhere?

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Thanks for the recommend guys, currently watching the George Harrison documentary. I admit its been a while since I thought about the Beatles until I saw the trailer of the documentary . I grew up listening to them religiously when I was younger, dad only had the red and blue album but I demolished that tape rewinding it listening on repeat ad naseum. Then came napster and I got every album they made, but then grunge came and metal and I sort of fell out of listening to the Beatles. I don't think I got bored with them, but the trappings of being a teenager and emotional angst, grunge and metal just resonated more at the time. The years past and I don't think I actually listened to the Beatles properly until now, just all the memories, and how bloody great they were. Also fond memories of watching Yellow Submarine on CH4 after Boxing day.  But yeah the Beatles are alright. 

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17 hours ago, yakumo said:

Besides from the anthology and The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years, anything else people recommend and any other music documentaries too?.

 

There was a 17-part documentary made in the late 1970s called All You Need Is Love. It had one episode about the Beatles but it was a lot more wide-ranging than that. I saw some of it when it was repeated on TV in about 2008/9, around when it was released on DVD. As a documentary, it's probably pretty dated now, but it's a great source of interviews and performance clips.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_You_Need_Is_Love:_The_Story_of_Popular_Music

https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2016/may/26/all-you-need-is-love-review-a-glorious-account-of-70s-pop

 

 

Other music documentaries, not specifically about the Beatles:

 

20 Feet From Stardom (2013) is a great documentary about backing singers.

 

 

 

And Searching For Sugar Man. Everyone loves that film!

 

Most of the Classic Albums documentaries are good, if you're a fan of the bands they're covering.

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It has of course been said a million times but Ringo is the band's secret weapon. He seems to be sleepwalking and just hanging throughout the rehearsal process but really shines in front of an audience. Every band should be lucky enough to have a Ringo. I'm playing with a dishcloth on my snare from now on.

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There was always this idea / rumour / myth that Ringo was a really crap drummer. It seems to have dropped away a bit, but when I was growing up the accepted wisdom was that Ringo wasn't very good, to the point where I was really surprised when a friend of mine at university who played the drums said he thought Ringo was a brilliant drummer. I guess most people (including me) wouldn't know good drumming from bad provided it isn't crashingly out of time, but it's surprising how prevalent the idea was

 

I remember reading somewhere that tit stemmed from a Jasper Carrott joke in the eighties - "Ringo wasn't the best drummer in the world. He wasn't even the best drummer in the Beatles" - which got erroneously attributed to John Lennon, but according to this web page:

 

https://www.radiox.co.uk/artists/beatles/did-john-lennon-say-ringo-wasnt-even-best-drummer/

 

...it actually came from Radio Active in 1981. The research is credited to Tim Worthington, who knows his stuff about radio comedy. Weird how a not particularly funny but elegantly phrased joke from a largely forgotten Radio 4 programme could have such a wide effect.

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6 hours ago, MansizeRooster said:

They were exceptionally tight throughout their career. The Beatles don't get enough credit for what an insanely strong live act they were, at all points in their history.

 

for a band that gave up live performances - and how nervous Paul looked before it - they were absolutely TIGHT AF.  Tremendous energy on that rooftop.

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4 hours ago, K said:

There was always this idea / rumour / myth that Ringo was a really crap drummer. It seems to have dropped away a bit, but when I was growing up the accepted wisdom was that Ringo wasn't very good, to the point where I was really surprised when a friend of mine at university who played the drums said he thought Ringo was a brilliant drummer. I guess most people (including me) wouldn't know good drumming from bad provided it isn't crashingly out of time, but it's surprising how prevalent the idea was

 

I remember reading somewhere that tit stemmed from a Jasper Carrott joke in the eighties - "Ringo wasn't the best drummer in the world. He wasn't even the best drummer in the Beatles" - which got erroneously attributed to John Lennon, but according to this web page:

 

https://www.radiox.co.uk/artists/beatles/did-john-lennon-say-ringo-wasnt-even-best-drummer/

 

...it actually came from Radio Active in 1981. The research is credited to Tim Worthington, who knows his stuff about radio comedy. Weird how a not particularly funny but elegantly phrased joke from a largely forgotten Radio 4 programme could have such a wide effect.

 

It's partially because people have weird ideas of what a great drummer is, largely connected to the Ginger Baker, Buddy Rich billion-hits-a-second stuff when that's really more the drummer equivalent of Joe Satriani and Steve Vai.

 

I always thought Roger Taylor was a real musical drummer and really managed to lift early Queen songs just the right amount and find a distinct addition to every song, for example. Never gets his due.

 

Edit: Sorry, never finished my thought - I meant I think he followed in a style that was very Ringo-like. A vital addition, but oft ignored unfairly.

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