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All time greatest gaming moment

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5 hours ago, Calashnikov said:

 

This is the actual answer. For everyone. All of us. Surely.

 

Except that was my first gaming moment (Mario 64).  I didn't know I was starting with the creme de la creme, more concerned with getting to grips with all the basic, unlisted, rules of video gaming.  My real 2D->3D moment came later with GTA3.  

 

Probably the game that qualifies, in a number of different instances, would be Oblivion  Not so much the initial exit from the sewers (it was dark) but the realisation that there was this massive world to explore, all of it relatively safe (unlike Morrowind) and all of it incredibly detailed (for the time obviously) - the views in a few places, the way the trees bent in the wind.... I wish I had a single Deus Ex memory, but sadly not.  Much more recently, the conclusion to Prey was one of the real standouts.

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Stepping out onto the plateau in Breath of the Wild,  was very special. Seeing the world before me, knowing in a few hours I'll be down there exploring it all.

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Oh and importing Guitar Hero, it costing me an arm and a leg but the sheer, gloriously, unbridled joy of feeling like I can play guitar. It was fucking glorious. 

 

The same feeling when I imported Rock Band for an ungodly amount of money but playing it with 3 other people was worth every single penny.

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Nothing will come close to completing the original Epic quests in Everquest. Hundreds of man hours, legions of people (40+) do do the multiple raids required, the terror of potentially losing your quest items to start over again and no instancing meant to get a spawn your guild had to race the others to the spawns or lose it, only to repeat the same thing several real time days later. It was pure madness. Getting my shaman her spear was like winning the  lottery and made you a proper server wide personality, amazing crazy days.

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I had a break from gaming during the PSX/N64 era so didn't play Mario 64 until many years later and couldn't see what all the fuss was about when I experienced it. I should probably give it another shot eh?

 

Another Spectrum one: Starstrike. Proper OMFG it's the Star Wars vector game at home!

 

Also Street Fighter II when it first hit arcades :omg:

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14 hours ago, matt0 said:

The opening to LTTP, creeping in to the castle in the rain, finding the secret entrance to the dungeon.

 

14 hours ago, Mr Do 71 said:

Stepping out onto the plateau in Breath of the Wild,  was very special. Seeing the world before me, knowing in a few hours I'll be down there exploring it all.

:wub:

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1 hour ago, Camel said:

Also Street Fighter II when it first hit arcades :omg:

My first memory of Street Fighter II is seeing an actual queue of people lining up to play it. Not in Japan – in an arcade in southern England. Only seen that before with an arcade game with Pac-Land, and never since. Didn’t play SF II in an arcade until the following year (encouraged after reading Total’s review of the Super NES conversion), but it was like nothing I’d seen before. Those graphics, and the sense of weight and power in the fighters... amazing.

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Completing all 96 exits in Super Mario World was a particularly special moment. You don’t get anything as a reward other than a more autumnal palette on the overworld map and the alteration of a few enemies, but the sense of mastery and achievement was unmatched at the time,  and felt a satisfying way to finish off the pack-in game on your shiny new Super NES.

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Having only played Sonic on the Master System then my brothers mate lent us a megadrive with Sonic. So many colours!

 

Going to my mates house and seeing his older brothers playing LTTP, I'd never seen this type of game before.  

 

I still love LTTP but I'm not interested at all by Sonic. 

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The giraffe scene in The Last of Us. The cynic in me thinks it’s a manipulative piece of game creation. But screw what the cynic thinks; it’s a wonderful moment in a wonderful game. A time to reflect on the main protagonists’ bond, the changing world and nature’s ability to surpass man. I was an absolute sucker for that scene. 

 

More recently, PSVR has been an absolute revelation. The utter sense of escapism is majestic. And despite my initial concerns, there is real range in the gaming experiences available through VR. 

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Stepping out of the escape pod and onto the Halo - the screen flares white, the music kicks in, the Ring bends up away from you, the grass, the sunlight, the senss of freedom and the feeling that you can tackle this any way you like. Nothing has come close since. 

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2 hours ago, Protocol Penguin said:

Completing all 96 exits in Super Mario World was a particularly special moment. You don’t get anything as a reward other than a more autumnal palette on the overworld map and the alteration of a few enemies, but the sense of mastery and achievement was unmatched at the time,  and felt a satisfying way to finish off the pack-in game on your shiny new Super NES.

9A1919DB-4D70-47F1-BCA3-56D97760A58F.png.8b1e977c6ef36e248f1f3cbdd28a848c.png

You do get something.

 

 

The game tells "you you are a super player!!". What more could you ask for?

 

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coming back up from the map room with that ridiculous guitar solo wailing as you wreck the shit out of everyone on Silent Cartographer. fuckkin yaas

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22 hours ago, Cosmic_Guru said:

 

Except that was my first gaming moment (Mario 64).  I didn't know I was starting with the creme de la creme, more concerned with getting to grips with all the basic, unlisted, rules of video gaming.  My real 2D->3D moment came later with GTA3.

 

That cuts both ways as well - if you grew up with home computers rather than consoles the odds were you'd been heavily subjected to 3D for a long time prior to Mario 64, and if you weren't a platformer/Mario fan it likely felt less exciting than (say) moving from the 2D Ultimas to Underworld, or playing Doom for the first time.

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On 27/01/2019 at 14:23, Pob said:

The one that always occurs to me when I see this kind of thread is on the surface incredibly mundane, a bit like @Mr. Gerbik's Yojimbo one:

 

Blocking a door with a chair in Deus Ex.

 

I was quite far into the game, sneaking around an office-type environment in the dead of night. There were a couple of night watchmen on patrol. I found an office with a computer I wanted to hack, but I was worried that one of the guards would come in and find me hunched over a computer reading private emails. So I tried picking up a chair and plonking it in front of the door, just to be safe. Sure enough, I was mid-hack and I heard the door rattling. The guard tried for a bit, then his AI routine gave up and he continued on his rounds. I thought "holy 

shit, that actually fucking worked".

 

That, for me, sums up what I really love about games. I felt as if I was in a real place, or at least a decent simulation of a real place, where the laws of the real world were modelled to the extent that I could devise and execute my own solution to a problem. The game world had the requisite open-ended interactivity for me to pick up an everyday object and block a door with it. The physics behaved as I expected - the object was heavy enough to prevent the door from being opened. And the AI of the NPC held up. He tried the door, then abandoned that task and got on with his life.

 

So the biggest "holy shit, this is incredible" moment for me was stopping a guard get into a room with a chair.

 

Years later I used a similar tactic extensively in Alien Isolation, which also has terminals you have to use in real-time. Every time I was in a room with a terminal that meant I needed my back to the door I'd rig up a pipe bomb at the entrance as an early-warning system in case Alan made an appearance.

 

Mind blown.  A few weeks ago I finished Deux ex 1, and throughout my play through I never thought to use chairs in that way.

 

On topic;  VR has continually wowed me.  Putting on the headset for the first time in The Lab was a turning point in my video game playing.

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On ‎27‎/‎01‎/‎2019 at 12:05, Mr. Gerbik said:

"You're on your own now, good luck" in Morrowind. I haven't felt like I was stepping in an actual other world with endless possibilities the way I did in Morrowind back then, before or since.

 

 

This absolutely got me as well, as you take your first steps out of the starting town and everything seems exotic and interesting and you have absolutely no idea what to expect - it's still my favourite of the series for capturing that feeling of wonder.

 

The final sequence in Mass Effect 1 from landing on the planet where you meet Virgil pretty much all the way through to the end was one of the most thrilling things in video games for me, partly because I was just in love with the game and completely wrapped up in the lore and stuff. But man that was awesome.

 

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On 27/01/2019 at 19:01, erhgiez said:

The finale of MGS3, it just kept going and kept giving until that beautiful and melancholic final scene. 

 

Ohhh yes! Its action just keeps building and building to absurd levels of scale, through the Volgin fight and the bike chase and the bridge detonation after which Volgin's somehow still alive so you fight him again. Then the pace calms down a bit with the EVA escort bit (an escort sequence that's actually not terrible!), before the final Boss fight, and that one final devastating moment of interactivity.

 

Spoiler

...Except it's not quite the final moment of interactivity, because Ocelot's got one more trick up his sleeve.

 

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Doom, on PC. Wolfenstein had been amazing, but this just looked, sounded and played like a distinct “everything is going to be different now” moment. Just light years ahead of anything prior.

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Playing Ridge Racers on PSP launch day.  It was so far ahead graphically of any other portable game ever released.  Totally mind-blowing.

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Mario 64 definitely tops the list, there's no doubt whatsoever. The N64 is probably my favourite hardware launch, the one I was the most excited about – scouring magazines for every bit of info and dreaming of the day I'd have one at home. SM64 was just perfect and is by far my most played Mario game. My cousin and I experienced almost that entire gaming era together, taking it in turns. It was a really special time.

 

Ridge Racer and Wipeout, for defining the start of the console 3D era. (And the T-Rex demo was good, too)

 

Radiant Silvergun, for the mind-bending and creative depth layering.

 

Soul Calibur, for proving home gaming was now beyond "arcade perfect".

 

I think Shenmue deserves a mention – in much the same way as SM64 it was like nothing before it, realising a detailed world like no other. I remember all my uni mates crowded round my LG Flatron to see what all the fuss was about, and they didn't move for hours. (granted.. its quite a slow game!). Shenmue 2 for all of the above and more.

GTA3 had the same kind of impact – I'd never seen such a huge, populated 3d world, and the sandbox concept was spectacularly addictive. 

The scope and scale of Operation Flashpoint gave me the same reaction, and the way you could discover alternative ways to accomplish many objectives was particularly amazing – why be a sniper when you can track down and steal a gunship somewhere else on the map? 

 

RE:make, for the spectacular visuals that added so much to a game I already loved. I know it's not all about graphics, but that leap was astounding.

 

Finally, Christmas NiGHTS, for being the most special cover disc of all time. Thanks SSM.

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