Jump to content
chris on the moon

Bros: After the screaming stops

Recommended Posts

Genuine moments of comedy genius, it's just a shame it doesn't end with the drummer convincing his brother to try out some jazz while supporting some Muppets. 

 

I love the tour of the house, annoyingly not on you tube but it feels like it could be scripted it's so well edited as well. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Limmy mentioned it on twitter. I opened the link on iplayer and was considering it, but he has quite an .... individual taste in music so I thought maybe he was just big into bros and it wouldn't interest me.

 

Definitely watching now!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Watched this the other night and nearly started a topic for it. 

 

Spent the first half an hour wondering if it actually might be a spoof. The bit about the conkers petition is pure Partridge.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, OneDvBmbr said:

Watched this the other night and nearly started a topic for it. 

 

Spent the first half an hour wondering if it actually might be a spoof. The bit about the conkers petition is pure Partridge.

 

"I can live with it"

  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it just about the Goss twins, or is Craig, the bass player, in it as well? ISTR when they broke up he moved into studio work and bacame a producer for various other bands. I know this stuff because my sister was a big Bros (and Five Star) fan at the time - I vaguely remember her having a massive fit one time after I recorded over some of her Bros stuff with some Star Trek TNG episodes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, FishyFish said:

Is it just about the Goss twins, or is Craig, the bass player, in it as well? ISTR when they broke up he moved into studio work and bacame a producer for various other bands. I know this stuff because my sister was a big Bros (and Five Star) fan at the time - I vaguely remember her having a massive fit one time after I recorded over some of her Bros stuff with some Star Trek TNG episodes.

 

From memory Craig is not really mentioned at all. It’s purely about the brothers. 

 

As as someone has mentioned, in amongst all the unintentional (?) comedy, there are some moving moments. They won’t be the bits everyone remembers however.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I really liked about this was the way that it drew me in by making fun of what a wally Matt Goss is, but gradually made me care about both of them. The sequence where Luke talks about hitting rock bottom and having to give his engagement ring back to his fiancé was touching, and once you strip away the Brentisms and the seething resentment, you get more of a sense of who the Goss Bros are.

 

I'm almost embarrassed to admit this, but one thing I thought worked really well was bookending the film with the two versions of 'When Will I be Famous?". With the original at the start, there was this thrill of recognition, followed by a realisation that it's a pretty bobbins song. But with the rearranged version at the end, I found myself thinking it was actually alright. I was possibly in a more forgiving mood after warming to the Gosses, but I thought it was a neat summation of the film and the journey it took you on.

  • Upvote 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is this available anywhere other than iTunes?  Confession time, I was obsessed with this band when I was about 9. 

 

1 hour ago, K said:

I'm almost embarrassed to admit this, but one thing I thought worked really well was bookending the film with the two versions of 'When Will I be Famous?". With the original at the start, there was this thrill of recognition, followed by a realisation that it's a pretty bobbins song.

We got a cat among the pigeons here, fellas!! 

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know how much of it is amped up by the editing but I'm more than willing to forgive Luke all of his own little moments just for having to deal with his brother for so many years.

 

Forgiveneeeeeeeess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This was great. 

 

Some of it was indeed moving, but for me the highlight was:

Spoiler

Matt: We can't play conkers in england anymore!!

 

Luke: ... :mellow: ... I can live with that.

 

:lol: 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, K said:

What I really liked about this was the way that it drew me in by making fun of what a wally Matt Goss is, but gradually made me care about both of them. The sequence where Luke talks about hitting rock bottom and having to give his engagement ring back to his fiancé was touching, and once you strip away the Brentisms and the seething resentment, you get more of a sense of who the Goss Bros are.

 

This is how I felt - thought by the end it painted quite a sympathetic picture of them both. I dunno, I've never minded someone who's a bit of a nob if their heart's in the right place and nothing in the film made me dislike either of them. A friend of mine was the co-director of this but I only watched it on iPlayer a couple of nights ago. Messaged him in the morning wondering how the brothers reacted to the premiere. He said they walked out first time, thought they'd changed it the second time and cried and cheered the third time! So there you go.

  • Upvote 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is brilliant, up there with Some Kind of Monster as a band documentary

 

They are both sensitive artistic nob types but do come across in the end as likeable despite all that and I found myself hoping the end show went well.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A thousand upvotes for finding this. Remarkable.  Starts off reminding me very much of David Brent and was actually toying with the idea that this was all a parody (especially after the reveal that Luke's new career is as an actor), but then the after the amazing arguments there is that emotional mid-section and they come across very well in the end.  Loveable, pretentious, a bit dim, but hearts of gold.

 

This is the interview on This Morning following that spat, to save anyone else searching for it 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still not quite sure which is which but either Ant or Dec, "passive-aggressive spice", the one with the hat on, if you'd told me that he'd pulled out of the documentary at the last minute and was being played by Paul Danan, I honestly would not have blinked.

The other guy, seemingly voiced by Mackenzie Crook, wearing a Kurt Cobain t-shirt and a cannabis leaf sweatband. What are you, fifteen?

 

Found them both strangely endearing by the end.

Yer man spouting that "profound" waffle at the finish, words so powerful he even moved himself to tears! Haha, you great daft sod.

 

What was it? Something like "the world is full of one way streets but one of these streets is 2 way and me and my brother met in the middle and 2 things happen when worlds collide, destruction, but it also creates a new, third planet"

 

Might want to check the science on that, and probably best to stick to the one-way system if you've got entire planets rolling down the roads.

It was just such a joyful stream of mixed metaphors, unfiltered egotism and innocence. Just delightful.

 

His eyes sought of glazed over, it was as if he was sat back in his chair watching himself along with the audience, entranced by the carousel of pretty colours and horsies in his mind, he gets a lump in his throat "Oh god, news just in ... they've discovered water on the planet ... we did it guys!"

 

(fade to black) If you didn't get to your feet and applaud furiously then you're not human.

 

I hope he doesn't think he was stitched up by the editor because I don't think it's done either of them any harm.

As Gotters said, I never thought I'd be emotionally invested in whether or not a bros gig went ahead.

 

You often hear talk of our generation refusing to grow up and that we're all big babymen and overgrown princesses, christ, when you throw fame into the mix as well, that bloke was just a really lanky toddler with stubble.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That was the most interesting element for me. As a character study of what happens when someone gets a big quick blast of fame. Bros were fucking HUGE, but it was very fleeting. And it's caused some sort of PTSD that has informed Matt's entire personality from that moment forward. Its pretty fascinating. 

I think from a mental health perspective being a pop star is probably one of the most dangerous jobs in the world. They're all fucking mental.

  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That bit where he goes "We're all kings. I see some bloke sweeping the streets"

and you're rolling your eyes thinking "oh, here we go, some mock-humble, self-deifying speech about how we're all equal"

and then he pulls the rug out from under you by saying something along the lines of "rather him than me, I'd fucking hate to do that" :lol:

 

My sister was into bros HARD, posters on the wall, bottlecaps on her shoes, the lot, so I had to endure their music around the house.

"I'm a man, not a boy"

Immediately undermined by a five year olds' laughable simulacrum of gravelly masculinity "euuurgh oo-er!"

 

Jerloodumdoodumday, indeed.

 

Fun Bros fact, Russell Brand was a big fan growing up, posters on the wall, everything. Not sure if that was before, or perhaps even the reason why, he started smoking heroin.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reading reviews of it shows how mean spirited people can be and the resentment there will always be to popular artists - Matt is not my cup of tea musically at all, but he lead one of the worlds biggest bands for short while, and then managed to have a 6 year residency in Vegas at a big venue, these things don't get gifted to anybody without a shred of talent for something (that talent may be selling tickets or being popular, but its still a huge talent to have).

 

My takeaway from this isn't laughing at the cod psychology or 'deep' interview moments (though they were hilarious), but just how much being in the band affected them and how hard they must have had to work to reinvent themselves like that in the US, where the competition is pretty tough, even if you are English. 

 

I suspect it was ego that greenlit the documentary to get made, but its up for me with the Metalica epic Some Kind of Monster as a truthful representation of these kind of things. 

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm willing to put my neck on the line and say that their lyrics were utter gash, but you're right, music is subjective, there's no right or wrong.

I'm in no position to judge whether or not the drummer guy is good at drumming, but it sounded pretty good to me, and the other guys voice is pretty good. Like you say, you wouldn't last that long in Vegas without at the very least having some sort of technical competence and staying power. There's obviously talent there.

I felt nothing but warmth towards both of them at the finish.

I hope my comments came across as juvenile rib poking rather than mean spirited.

 

Could you link to these reviews? I'd be interested to read them. I assumed we'd watch this and go to bed but I've been up watching related videos on youtube. I'm obsessed!

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Gotters said:

Reading reviews of it shows how mean spirited people can be and the resentment there will always be to popular artists - Matt is not my cup of tea musically at all, but he lead one of the worlds biggest bands for short while, and then managed to have a 6 year residency in Vegas at a big venue, these things don't get gifted to anybody without a shred of talent for something (that talent may be selling tickets or being popular, but its still a huge talent to have).

 

My takeaway from this isn't laughing at the cod psychology or 'deep' interview moments (though they were hilarious), but just how much being in the band affected them and how hard they must have had to work to reinvent themselves like that in the US, where the competition is pretty tough, even if you are English. 

 

I suspect it was ego that greenlit the documentary to get made, but its up for me with the Metalica epic Some Kind of Monster as a truthful representation of these kind of things. 

 

That's bollocks. There's no resentment. There's good natured ribbing at how unaware of himself Matt is quickly followed with genuine sentiment. Everyone enjoys the final act with a successful performance and the brothers coming together. But everyone can also point out that Matt is just a bit of a nob. Nothing wrong with that 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Gotters said:

My takeaway from this isn't laughing at the cod psychology or 'deep' interview moments (though they were hilarious), but just how much being in the band affected them and how hard they must have had to work to reinvent themselves like that in the US, where the competition is pretty tough, even if you are English. 

 

Yes, totally agree. People who are primarily interested in this for the mockery it affords miss the real insight of the doc, naturally.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.