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British Restaurant Style Curry


Sardan
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And now the base gravy before and after blending:

 

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Blended it in the Thermomix and it took two goes as there is so much. I’m a bit worried I don’t have enough room in the freezer. 
 

It cooks for another hour now and is thinned until it’s the consistency of milk. 
 

Recipe here:  

 

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I had to do an early curry tonight as we have a Zoom call in a bit.  There’s been a lot of talk on The Secret Curry Club Facebook group about Chicken Chasni, so I thought I give it a go.


I used a tweaked version of The Curry Guy’s recipe using about 1/3 of the sweet ingredients, 2 chillis, dried crushed chilli, a handful of fresh methi leaves and much less red food colouring. And it was really good.  I’ll definitely make it again.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Horribleman said:

That looks sublime.

 

Do you reckon you have the restaurant style nailed then?

 

What are your top tips please??


My wife reckons they’re better than takeaways, which I’ll definitely take as a compliment 8-)

 

My top tip would be to watch people making them on YouTube to get a feel for it.  For a good curry you have to add the right ingredients at the right time.  If you do things out of sequence then it won’t taste right.  
 

Also prep all of the ingredients ahead of time, then the actual cooking is really quick. 

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It's very delicate but complex, I have done the one from the curry secret book a good few years ago which I found a little to bland so I have high hope for this... And with it been lockdown I have the time to spent.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I'm an absolute convert to this stuff too - Al's Kitchen has been a goldmine. Cheers everyone.

 

That said, I made chicken chasni the other night, and it felt like it lacked character. It was really tasty, no doubt, but it felt like a top-flight version of a generic 'chicken curry'. 

 

Compared to the jalfrezi, balti and garlic chilli chicken, it's in fourth place. If I was to make it again, I'd probably up the heat significantly and work on making a more sour version.

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  • 1 month later...

I did a Bhuna for the ladies. My daughter said it was better than a restaurant. 
 

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I though she was being kind but the results were good. 
 

A bit later I made a garlic chilli chicken extra hot based on Misty’s Phall recipe. 
 

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OMFG! :omg:

 

 

It was the best curry I have ever eaten anywhere in my entire life. (I may have been a bit intoxicated, but still.)

 

It really was that good.

 

One thing I did differently was pre cook the chicken. In the past I have either cooked it in the pan or, more often, used chicken tikka that has been cooked over charcoal on the BBQ. I don’t know why I bothered. 
 

Misty recommends pre cooking the chicken by poaching in water with Tumeric, cloves and cardomon. He then stores it in a base gravy sauce. I was using it straight away, well almost so didn’t bother with that. I’ll be honest I was sceptical. However it was really good and very moist. I think that was because it’s only poached for 8-10 minutes and then put in cold water to stop it cooking. 
 

I’m planning on doing this again tonight but to be honest I’m a bit scared I won’t be able to replicate last week’s success.  

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21 hours ago, Gotters said:

You’ve just sold 2 books on Amazon.

 

Home cooked curry from scratch is the best food I know how to make - its alchemy.


They’re great books. I have been using Al’s Base Gravy 2 with these recipes and I think I have found curry nirvana. Last nights results were as good as last week’s. 

 

Bhuna:
 

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Garlic Chili Chicken Phaal. 
 

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Over the years, yes I have tried many times at making curry without base gravy. I have a huge number of cookery books and given my love of curry quite a few are for Indian recipes. 
 

I’ve had mixed success with these, some have been good and some have been pretty poor. The results are probably down to me as much as the recipes. 
 

But they have never really been Indian restaurant style curry.  Some have been close and some very good even if not in the BIR style. To get those sort of results you really need to use a curry base. It’s isn’t much effort to make then base at its basically throw everything in, cook blend, cook. It then takes very little time to make the curries. Which is why it’s the method used in restaurants. Lots of prep and then everything cooked to order. 

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I've only made curries without a base, but get my recipes/inspiration from Get Curried on YouTube, which is hosted out of India so all recipes tend to be from scratch without a base.

 

I tried a base BIR style one early on and didn't get a good result, but will try again. 

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For years, I assumed that my unwillingness to use a half kilo of ghee was the reason my curries weren't 'right'. 

 

Now I'm entirely convinced it was the base gravy all along. As well as pre-cooking the meat.

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The ghee definitely adds flavour but I don’t always use it and when I do I use only a small amount using olive oil or coconut oil for the rest of the fat. You can definitely use less than the recipes suggest as well. 

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Don't get me wrong, I love cooking, but purely from a cost perspective, I can't really see how this isn't really expensive.

 

I looked at all the ingredient's from Al's base gravy 2 and wrote down what it would cost to actually buy everything (excluding the oil. water and salt). 

 

The total came to £30.84 (that's just the base, doesn't include any meat or extras you need to make a curry.

 

I realise that I will have a lot of the ingredients already and you don't use a whole bag of spice, but you still need to buy it at some point.

 

A lamb bhuna costs £6.95 from my takeaway and a chicken tikka masala £7.50

 

Even if I went to the Indian shop and bought all the spices there I'd probably only save £5-10. 

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I already had most of the base gravy ingredients in, so it didn't really cost me much. 

 

Plus, for £30, you could probably make about 10 batches, each lasting about 10 curries. It all pans out.

 

As far as pre-cooking the meat, it seems to be the secret to perfect meat/sauce consistency, and the pre-cooked meat tends to be somewhat marinated too. Not to mention it means you can make most curries in ten minutes.

 

I'd probably suggest trying it yourself to compare, but the pre-cooked chicken per Al's recipe is cooked with ginger, garlic and base gravy, and it seems to offer a flavour I haven't been able to match with cooking in the curry pan. I don't think most BIR curries seem to benefit from adding extra time to stew, burn, or separate.

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4 hours ago, stephen129 said:

Don't get me wrong, I love cooking, but purely from a cost perspective, I can't really see how this isn't really expensive.

 

I looked at all the ingredient's from Al's base gravy 2 and wrote down what it would cost to actually buy everything (excluding the oil. water and salt). 

 

The total came to £30.84 (that's just the base, doesn't include any meat or extras you need to make a curry.

 

I realise that I will have a lot of the ingredients already and you don't use a whole bag of spice, but you still need to buy it at some point.

 

A lamb bhuna costs £6.95 from my takeaway and a chicken tikka masala £7.50

 

Even if I went to the Indian shop and bought all the spices there I'd probably only save £5-10. 


I struggle to see how that can be right I am afraid. The base gravy is made from stuff we generally have already or would buy as part of the weekly shop. Even if you had to start from scratch you’ll have loads of spices left over. One batch probably makes a dozen portions. 
 

Edit: I need to make a batch. I’ll work out how much it costs me and how much base I get. 

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