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Thor

Cormac McCarthy's writing style.

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It came boring out of the east like some ribald satellite of the coming sun howling and bellowing in the distance and the long light of the headlamp running through the tangled mesquite brakes and creating out of the night the endless fenceline down the dead straight right of way and sucking it back again wire and post mile on mile into the darkness after where the boilersmoke disbanded slowly along the faint new horizon and the sound came lagging and he stood still holding his hat in his hands in the passing ground-shudder watching it till it was gone.

 

Is the kindle ebook fucked, or is punctuation anathema to McCarthy? 

 

I'm not going to continue reading if that's how he writes. 

 

 

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You get used to it.

 

Having said that I've only ever read it in print, so I guess the typesetting make it more of a problem on Kindle.

 

Hilary Mantel wrote Wolf Hall in a similar style and after it became a huge break out hit I've always wondered if her editor stepped in and said, "nope, you're not doing that for sequel."

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Hmmm, it's got such high praise I may persevere. But the overuse of "and" is maddening. 

 

And yes, I've started reading it on a small phone, so that one massive sentence has take up the whole screen. :lol:

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Haha, wait until you get to the pages of untranslated Spanish.

 

It is annoying at first, but you very rapidly get used to it and even start to wonder what the purpose of all that punctuation is in other books. The lack of punctuation is a really important part of McCarthy's voice, it's a bit like the way that Irvine Welsh writes - it really evokes the time and the place that the books take place.

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There's a beautiful almost mesmerising rythm to it, but it takes time. Blood meridian and the border trilogy are both in my top ten probably, stick with it!

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Yeah it's really integral to his work - hugely important to the pacing, and evocative of the slow, thoughtful nature of many of the characters and environments. 

And as @K said, it's funny how you go on to read other things and chuckle / seethe inwardly at the OTT use of punctuation.

I loved The Crossing most of all.

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