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lyly

Creative Block

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I don't know, I feel so anxious to do so many things in my life, school and home, but I just keep crying in my bedroom, listening to songs that I will never create or thinking about the meaning of living.

Maybe I'm in a "creative block"?

Can someone help me about it?

 

I like to take pics, make lyrics, poems and draw. Please, help me. I am an artist stuck on own nightmare.

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Spend some time looking / reading / listening to the work of people you admire and find interesting. I find that looking at photobooks almost always drives me to want to get out and take my own pictures.

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Yeah, if nothing else. Look what other people are doing and copy that. Then look at the results and ask yourself what you got right, what you like. And then ask yourself what you want to improve. How to make the work your own.

 

Really, it's just getting down to stuff, anything, being creative and being honest about the result. Then doing it again and working on it till it improves. 

 

Very, very few of us are born with the ability to just knock something out on a whim. You have to work on it. Develop it until you're happy it's as good as you can do it. 

 

My art teacher always says "how many times have you painted that face or that view? If it's the first, why do you think it will be perfect. Even Monet and Michelangelo had to learn to be great artist.“

 

Dont worry if the result is duff. I take a 1000 pictures at a motor race and pick maybe a dozen I really like. Its no biggie. The only person marking the results is me, and I know if I cheated. 

 

Go on. It'll be fine :D

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Just do. Once you accept the fact that not everything you make will be 'good' it gets easier. Just write something. Draw something. Just do it. If nothing comes nothing comes and you try again later, but you might find that the stopper comes out of the bottle and you can't shut the bloody thing off.

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Try to create your own little world that exists by its own rules and find joy and satisfaction in it. Language like persistence and work aren't helpful; you have to find the reasons to do it. It's not work, it is fun, it is an escape, it's an environment where you can be free to cause chaos, try things out, follow your curiosity. We attach words like 'talent' like there's a difference in people because we are obsessed with assessing. At school kids will be taught about Van Gogh but the teacher won't emphasize that he was prolific later in life, painting from 27 years onwards, and that he wrote thousands of letters to his brother about his passion for art. We're taught that he was tortured and depressed and his suffering elevated his art, but his letters are so eloquent and lively, he expresses so much positivity. He didn't paint because he was depressed, he painted because a passion inside was ignited by the exploration of painting. He found it enough to not let it go. It's a balance and had he lived in todays times maybe he'd have been distracted, not found the same all consuming love for it. Kids should be taught that that is what defined him; his mental illness just held him back, added shades of melancholy to his art. In his condition painting would have been a sanctuary, provided even more of an escape, but the love was already established. Kids focus on 'greatness' and asked to copy, understand, analyse. There's no space to find what gives you a kick. 

 

I have hundreds of unfinished stuff I can quickly sift through. Be in denial about it's 'worth', ignore what everyone else does, get psyched by looking at old stuff with fresh eyes, and think; 'I quite like that, why do like it?' That can get me going, 'this has some good things about it, but isn't great - why?'

 

I used to work in a menial manual job I hated, I resented not being able to get up and carry on from the previous night's drawing. The way my day and life was framed I treasured the 15/30 minute breaks I got when I could draw. I'd never had that before or since. And I finished at 4pm then, ten minute cycle ride home. I found when it came to sketching I couldn't not be into it because the results would be pointless. I needed gems, needed the joy of shapes to come through. You can't fake it, it has nothing to do with technical skill. I've filled books sat in pockets of time, on lap in van, on plane, in waiting areas. When the industrialised world around us grinds you down and you relish playing.

 

In a different job and less hours I still notice my desire waning. I make goals that I know I will not meet if i don't put the hours in. It's easier to get your 'play' from videogames, to express yourself with words on forums in a more immediate way. I think art has to be an all consuming obsessive outlet, that the momentum must gain through it re enforcing itself. I really think you could take anyone in the world and get them going in art, whatever it may be then lock them in a room with only their art as escape and the results will be fascinating. With no distractions and only your art to pour your mind into you don't have a choice but for it to stimulate you. 

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On 24/10/2018 at 06:08, moosegrinder said:

Just do. Once you accept the fact that not everything you make will be 'good' it gets easier. Just write something. Draw something. Just do it. If nothing comes nothing comes and you try again later, but you might find that the stopper comes out of the bottle and you can't shut the bloody thing off.

 

As moosegrinder says, just do. I put off doing anything for years and years and years and have in the past two weeks now forced myself to start drawing again, nothing comes out as it is in my head and I've only managed 8 drawings I think (I missed 2 days, not consecutively though). Start simple, I've just said to spend half an hour an evening drawing something, the result have been far from spectacular but I'm already noticing differences in what I can do now compared to when I last drew on a regular basis which was 18 years ago when I was at school

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If you're struggling to create it can be because you have too many options. Limitations are your friends. Some of the best ideas I've had have come from severely limited scope. Try imposing severe limits on your options, and then work with what you have left. You'll then need to get creative to achieve decent results.

 

As an example, I once entered a video game creation competition where you had to use a random name generator to come up with the name of the game. I rolled Underwater Ostrich Attack. Now you can see that as extremely limiting, but it also provides a hell of a lot of focus. Some of what I created for that is really good (if properly nuts). 

 

Reduce your options early on to provide yourself with focus. Whatever medium you work in - try reducing your options by about 75% to start with. Then reduce it by 75% again to really feel the pinch. Now you've probably got a nice narrow field to work with. Just use two colours. Just use circles. Just use five letter words. Just use cubes. Just use iambic pentameter. Just use penguins...

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