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Google Stadia - "Future of Gaming" announced at GDC 2019

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Without announcements of any new or innovative games, or even a hint of what the business model is (monthly subscription? Ad supported? Just buying games as normal but streaming them?). The whole thing was pretty much nothing. Basically “if it works, maybe it will be good, but you’ve shown me nothing that convinces me it will work”.

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4 minutes ago, Comrade said:

Basically “if it works, maybe it will be good, but you’ve shown me nothing that convinces me it will work”.

 

How could they show you that it'd work without you discounting it based on your region/connection? I think the best way to demo it is get it in peoples hands.

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My superhot takes.

 

1. At some point there'll have to be a split between Google and YouTube. That's probably a discussion for another day.

 

2. No real exclusive content shown seems like a mistake. 

 

3. I thought the whole point of moving to cloud computing was that we wouldn't need dedicated boxes to handle each customers needs. Xcloud and this just seem to be moving the dedicated box to somewhere else. 

 

4.State share seems cool. 

 

Bit underwhelming really. 

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Honestly any lag is negligible. Iv gamed all my life and playing GeForce now you really don’t notice it at all, it’s totally playable. Obviously slower pace games are better on it compared to twitchy shooters, but the tech is definitely ready 

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For me, there are two key advantages of this system over prior streaming services.

 

Firstly, (and this is one that many people won't actually care about) multiplayer becomes a much fairer environment. They only touched on it briefly during the conference, but hacking/cheating is practically wiped out overnight and every online game is played on a virtual LAN. Yes, there will still be the latency of the video stream, but if you're happy with how that turns out, it means every action you take is immediately registered with other players, no more checking your ping.

 

Secondly, this is a fixed hardware system, not a hundreds of GTX 2080s crammed into a datacentre to power thousands of virtual machines. That might not sound noteworthy, but It means developers can optimise the hell out of it in the same way they do for home consoles.

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4 minutes ago, Nate Dogg III said:

The cynical old men have spoken

Considering the official stream I was watching - on youtube - with about 135k viewers could barley cope and 4k support dropped, it's not looking great so far to be honest.

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If the controller connects direct to the cloud via your home WiFi, theoretically you could play games directly through your TV with no need for an intermediary platform (PC, console, etc.), via one of them apps that all smart TVs have now. 

 

Thats pretty hot if they can pull it off. 

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So they’ve announced pretty much what we expected or already knew, but no actual details like when and what and how much.

 

What a waste of time.

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So, they can stream up to 8K with HDR at 120FPS.

Let's give them the benefit of the considerable, and assuming they have no space-time warping compression algorithm (else they'd surely have mentioned it) - what kind of data bandwidth does that kind of picture quality demand?

 

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2 minutes ago, deerokus said:

I'm more interested in it for pc game than console games - hopefully it will support keyboard and mouse. 

 

It does. They demoed it in the video.

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2 minutes ago, jonamok said:

So, they can stream up to 8K with HDR at 120FPS.

Let's give them the benefit of the considerable, and assuming they have no space-time warping compression algorithm (else they'd surely have mentioned it) - what kind of data bandwidth does that kind of picture quality demand?

 

 

553 GB per hour uncompressed.

 

Er, lol!

 

Disclosure: quick Google search and it was the top result, no idea if correct.

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But as noted elsewhere...
 

Quote

-No mods.
-No config tweaking.
-No reshade or any other graphical changes.
-No way to bypass bugs, you'll be forced to wait until developers fix them. If they ever do...
-No communities keeping games alive years after release by creating content for them.
-No using cheat engine to counter ugly balances in some single player games.
-No way to check game data (speedrunning)
-No game conservation as we don't know if every game will be always available.
-No control whatsoever over any part of the games.

 

 

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I thought it was interesting. I'm much less interested in playing Assassin's Creed 50 or Doom Eternal on it (the same games as elsewhere, but with lag!) than I might be in stuff people make for it specifically.

 

A cloud-based (as opposed to cloud-adapted) platform has the clear advantages they talked about of consistent server-states, predictable (and low) lag between game instances, and resistance to hacking/cheating.

 

I've spent enough time failing to shoot both enemies and players in Destiny (because of lag) to completely discount the idea that I might choose to trade one sort of lag for another.

 

And games based on sharing of challenges or game-state variables is already a thing. Spelunky has the daily challenge, Diablo 3 has something like that(?), Binding of Isaac had the really lumpy seed key you could share.

 

There's ideas there that could well result in actually new game types.

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10 minutes ago, RubberJohnny said:

 

How could they show you that it'd work without you discounting it based on your region/connection? I think the best way to demo it is get it in peoples hands.

 

Obviously the proof is in the playing, but they could have convinced me that it was something they were committed to tackling. They could come out and say something like “We know you’re sceptical about game streaming, and the main reason is latency. Well, we’ve cracked it, if you live in our designated areas and have internet speeds above this level we can almost guarantee less than Xms lag, because we’re using our innovative techniques like etc, etc, etc.”

 

There were some sops towards that kind of stuff, like the wifi controllers and the talk about providing a direct connection to the data centre, but not enough. It was just airy silicon valley guff.

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17 minutes ago, carlospie said:

Honestly any lag is negligible. Iv gamed all my life and playing GeForce now you really don’t notice it at all, it’s totally playable. Obviously slower pace games are better on it compared to twitchy shooters, but the tech is definitely ready 

 

Digital Foundry suggests the latency of Stadia is ok and comparable to playing the game on a Xbox One X. That’s pretty damn good. Same game at 60fps on a PC has a lot less but that’s not really a shock. 

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9 minutes ago, VN1X said:

But as noted elsewhere...
 

 

 

Can’t believe google just deleted from existence the entire concept of a gaming PC. 

 

Healthy scepticism is fine, but some of the responses to this thing are unhinged. 

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